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Adhd - Page 2

post #16 of 28
Dyslexia is different for everyone. I have it and have always read at grade lev growing up. It only effects my spelling in such a way that memorizing the way some words are spelled is like memorizing numbers.
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by bachbeet
Go to a pediatrician to get advice. Not here.

Good advice right 'thur.
post #18 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
I am just putting this out there, take it with a grain of salt - a very good friend of mine is a pediatric nurologist. he is ademantly against drugs for treating ADHD.

just another thing - I am dyslexic, as well (bet nobody guessed that one). I couldn't read until 3rd grade, it was very frustrating. I learned within weeks - once they figured out the problem and had a specialist help. today they are much more aware of these things. highly recomended to check it out.

Zach, Thanks. I am glad to hear that; I hate the idea of medication myself.

Obviously I will take him to a specialist at some point but I am not so overly concerned at the moment.

I will check into dyslexia but I have also read that some dietary and environmental factors may be significant. As a first step, I will look into these areas.
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
just another thing - I am dyslexic, as well (bet nobody guessed that one).
i definitely remember noticing that you made a bunch of very irregular typos (irregular in the sense that you were using a very advanced vocabulary, but occasionally misspelled a few smaller words)

i just figured you were a speed typist or something
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by oman
i definitely remember noticing that you made a bunch of very irregular typos (irregular in the sense that you were using a very advanced vocabulary, but occasionally misspelled a few smaller words)

i just figured you were a speed typist or something

I figured everybody had figured that out - aside from not having a great education, and english not being my strong language, I am dyslexic. It actually has little or no inpact on my day to day life - I use a spell checker for everything I do- and I never work on numbers without having somebody double check me. no real impact.


Alter - back to topic. I know exactly what it's like, you are always watching your kid for clues and you don't want to miss anything. if you keep feeling that way - take him to a pediatrictian. If you aren't happy with what the doctor suggests, try another. like I said, my friend has srong opinion on him, and I would take my son to him, if needed, so there are multiple options out there.
post #21 of 28
Three is pretty young to evaluate for adhd.

The gold standard of treatment for adhd in kids begins with behavioral interventions and progresses to meds + behavioral interventions. The fact of the matter is that there is no support for classroom modification, family counseling, parenting training, etc., etc., but there is money to buy meds.

This raises the broader issue of whether we have created a society in which we must medicate ourselves to succeed, cannot bear differences in temperament and style, and cannot bear difficulty. Whether we are talking about the use of ssris or stimulants for adhd, some of the issues are the same.

That said, meds are a life-saver for some kids. I mean this literally. Kids with untreated adhd have a much higher rate of accidental injury and death (think of the impulsive kid running out in the street). Kids with adhd also have high rates of depression (its comorbid), low school graduation and literacy rates, higher rates of incarceration, etc., etc. The life-outcomes for untreated adhd are quite severe.
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by philosophe
[in part...]

This raises the broader issue of whether we have created a society in which we must medicate ourselves to succeed, cannot bear differences in temperament and style, and cannot bear difficulty. Whether we are talking about the use of ssris or stimulants for adhd, some of the issues are the same.


I wonder to what extent the 'medical issues' we're now identifying with such frequency are attributable to what we're putting into ourselves in the first place. Not just the much-discussed sugar overload, but poor-quality, nutrient-deficient food in general, as well as various environmental concerns. Though on the other hand, for every expert who recites a litany of ways in which nutritional or environmental conditions are worsening, another will point to the ways in which it's better than it's ever been....
post #23 of 28
old russian saying: "never trust doctors, lawyers, or women."
post #24 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by philosophe
Kids with untreated adhd have a much higher rate of accidental injury and death (think of the impulsive kid running out in the street). Kids with adhd also have high rates of depression (its comorbid), low school graduation and literacy rates, higher rates of incarceration, etc., etc. The life-outcomes for untreated adhd are quite severe.

Philosophe, thanks for the frank and direct reply. I agree that 3 is too young to evaluate. I will be simply observing over the next few years and then get some professional assesment done.

I actually had a nice moment last weekend when we were out with some friends. They have a four year old that was a real terror. My kid seemed quite calm in comparison.

Tyto: Yes, the comparisons I have been making are with other little boys. The differences in temperment of genders is quite dramatic.
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alter
Philosophe, thanks for the frank and direct reply. I agree that 3 is too young to evaluate. I will be simply observing over the next few years and then get some professional assesment done.

I actually had a nice moment last weekend when we were out with some friends. They have a four year old that was a real terror. My kid seemed quite calm in comparison.

Tyto: Yes, the comparisons I have been making are with other little boys. The differences in temperment of genders is quite dramatic.

I recently took care of a 4 year old little girl, and she went through our house like a tornado, couldn't stick to a single activity longer than a minute, etc. It was a reality check, as I sometimes wonder about my son's defiance.
post #26 of 28
I guess I'll chime in here.

When I was young I was diagnosed with ADHD....well ADD actually...they didn't call it ADHD then. You can tell that I still have it now, do you see the..........I keep using? It's also why I need to surf the web for 40 seconds every 20 minutes while at work.

My case was a mild to moderate one, so take that into consideration, and by no means consider this medical advice!

It was recommended that I start treatment for my ADD at a young age. My parents were both teachers with a great deal of experience with children and chose to only resort to medication if everything else failed. I struggled with school, barely keeping my head above water, and nearly drove my parents nuts for a good decade while they kept me off of the drugs. But in the process something very important happened: I learned to harness my energy.

In my last years of high school I began to learn that I needed to sit in the front of the classroom if I was to pay any attention. I learned that I needed to be in a room, alone, with no distractions to study. I learned how to balance my desire to jump from activity to activity and actually leverage it sometimes. I ended high school with B's and A's and entered college, where this progression continued and I graduated top of my class with a B.S. in an advanced segment of chemical engineering.

Knock on wood this success has continued to snowball despite, and maybe even because of, my 'condition'. Being a high-energy individual I have learned to harness this to deeply focus on activities at times, and to juggle mutliple difficult tasks at others. Certainly this is a skill most successful people have to some degree, but I seem to have a special knack for it and I attribute it to what my doctors called ADD.

Now certainly there are instances where treatment is needed, and I won't even pretend to play Doctor. I will state that we are all unique, and 'ADHD' is a sliding scale and not an absolute condition. I have seen a lot of instances, such as mine, where medication is recommended for what doctor's perceive as a medical issue.

One of the greatest gifts that my parents gave me was the patience and tolerance to allow me to learn how to use an attribute that I see not as a medical condition, but as a gift.

Good luck!
post #27 of 28
I've done some research into this and while I am very opposed to the usage of Ritalin or other drugs for children diagnosed with ADHD, I have heard of some incredible stories in which dietary changes made huge differences.

Sugar, especially, is apparently one of the main triggers of this in young children. Additionally, processed foods can be a trigger.

I would check out some information on herbal/natural remedies and see if a change in diet might have some effect on your child.
post #28 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Henry Boogers
One of the greatest gifts that my parents gave me was the patience and tolerance to allow me to learn how to use an attribute that I see not as a medical condition, but as a gift.

Good luck!

Henry Boogers,

Many thanks for your thoughts on this; they are valuable, indeed. I will do my best to show the same caring and patient attitude that your parents did.
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