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Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread - Page 1757

post #26341 of 47027

My guess is that all the JR soles used by AE are used for shell.  They have scratched out "__________ SPORT by ALLEN EDMONDS"  I guess the party wanted JR soles and AE decided to reach into their JR bin and didn't notice or care.

post #26342 of 47027
Quote:
Originally Posted by polojock615 View Post

Try some reno.  I like the Clifton a lot.  I have them in brown calf and black shark.

I used Reno a few time, and even some RenoMat, but it didn't seem to change the visibility of this blemish at all. Maybe I'll try to be more aggressive with the RenoMat, I put that on lightly.

I've seen pictures of your shark Cliftons, and they are awesome!
post #26343 of 47027
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottyBoy920 View Post

This is the reason AE needs to make a burgundy/merlot strand. NEED!!!!

MTO??
post #26344 of 47027
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Edited by md2010 - 8/5/13 at 1:19am
post #26345 of 47027
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

When a Goodyear-welted shoe is made, the thick leather insole is tacked to the bottom of the last.  The bottom of the insole has the canvas gemming rib attached to the bottom of this leather insole using cement.  The leather upper of the shoe is wrapped around the last and is stitched to the canvas gemming.  The welt is then stitched through the upper to the gemming.  The sole is then stitched to the welt.  Essentially the gemmed insole is the point at which every vital component of the shoe is attached.  Before they sew on the outsole (the part that contacts the ground), they fill the void underneath the insole with cork.  So, if you rip out the insole and can see the cork, then you have removed the foundation of the shoe that everything is bound to.  Since your sole is rigid, the shoe will not immediately fall apart.  The upper and welt is still sewn to the gemming, and the welt is still sewn to the outsole.  However, the gemming is now just sitting there in the cork, and it isn't secured to anything.  As you wear the shoe, it will begin to walk out of shape.  It will become distorted, and it will begin to not fit properly. 

Gemming failure is widely considered the potential "weak-link" of Goodyear-welted shoes.  Gemming failure is what makers of hand-welted shoes claim to be the fundamental problem with Goodyear-welted shoes (hand-welted shoes don't use gemming, they carve a "hold-fast" under the insole instead of gluing on canvas).  The carved hold-fast can't come unglued, whereas gemming can.  That's why hand-welted shoe are theoretically better.  Gemming failure doesn't happen often enough for most people to decide that it isn't ok to use.  However, you have essentially created complete gemming failure by ripping out your insoles. 

I learn a lot about shoes reading this thread. Thanks again MWS!
post #26346 of 47027
Quote:
Originally Posted by cincikid View Post

Just thinking aloud here, but perhaps there's less variation in the fit of different lasts at the EEE width.

As an 11 3E I can tell you that that's not my experience . The 5 last is painfully narrow, and 3 is just right, and the 4 is even a little too roomy.
post #26347 of 47027
delete
Edited by md2010 - 8/5/13 at 1:17am
post #26348 of 47027
Quote:
Originally Posted by shartmann View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

When a Goodyear-welted shoe is made, the thick leather insole is tacked to the bottom of the last.  The bottom of the insole has the canvas gemming rib attached to the bottom of this leather insole using cement.  The leather upper of the shoe is wrapped around the last and is stitched to the canvas gemming.  The welt is then stitched through the upper to the gemming.  The sole is then stitched to the welt.  Essentially the gemmed insole is the point at which every vital component of the shoe is attached.  Before they sew on the outsole (the part that contacts the ground), they fill the void underneath the insole with cork.  So, if you rip out the insole and can see the cork, then you have removed the foundation of the shoe that everything is bound to.  Since your sole is rigid, the shoe will not immediately fall apart.  The upper and welt is still sewn to the gemming, and the welt is still sewn to the outsole.  However, the gemming is now just sitting there in the cork, and it isn't secured to anything.  As you wear the shoe, it will begin to walk out of shape.  It will become distorted, and it will begin to not fit properly. 

Gemming failure is widely considered the potential "weak-link" of Goodyear-welted shoes.  Gemming failure is what makers of hand-welted shoes claim to be the fundamental problem with Goodyear-welted shoes (hand-welted shoes don't use gemming, they carve a "hold-fast" under the insole instead of gluing on canvas).  The carved hold-fast can't come unglued, whereas gemming can.  That's why hand-welted shoe are theoretically better.  Gemming failure doesn't happen often enough for most people to decide that it isn't ok to use.  However, you have essentially created complete gemming failure by ripping out your insoles. 

I learn a lot about shoes reading this thread. Thanks again MWS!

+ 1 , very useful information, learning everyday.
post #26349 of 47027
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

You said you can see the cork foot bed, correct?  If you can see the cork foot bed, then you have ripped out the insole, and you have destroyed your shoes.  If there is still a thick piece of leather covering the cork foot bed, then you have only removed the sock liner.  Removing the sock liner isn't a big deal.  Trust me, if you have ripped out the insole from a Goodyear-welted shoe, you have destroyed your shoe. 

Lol. I thought I knew all about shoes(apparently not!). I don’t see the cork foot bed. What I see is a thick leather insole that I thought was cork foot bed. Lol.
I have ripped off the sock liner. Thank god I did. Have that much needed space inside. Thanks you for you in-depth information’s.
And removing the insole underneath would be really hard. I would need professional tools. And in removing the insole one would have literally rip off part if not most of their shoes.

Regs
Ash
post #26350 of 47027
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post #26351 of 47027
Quote:
Originally Posted by shartmann View Post

I have always really liked the walnut Clifton, and can spot it in a Nordstroms from a section away. I ended up getting a pair of walnut Strands instead, but thought I would get a pair of Cliftons at some point. So when Mr. Grangaard made his offer for MTO shoes, walnut shell Clifton was my choice. I really like these and think the color is just about perfect, and if I could I would replace many of my shoes with walnut shell. The rest of my AE's should be feeling a bit nervous, as I plan to wear these a lot.

 

AppleMark

 

AppleMark

 

AppleMark

 

 

I think they turned out great, with a small exception. You can't see it in the above pictures, but if you look at the left shoe from a different angle you can see what looks like a stray buff mark on the vamp. I couldn't make this mark go away no matter what I tried, but again you can only see it from certain angles. I don't think I want to send these back as other than this they are just about perfect. Just thought I would ask if anyone has seen something similar before. Does anyone know if this is part of how the leather was prepared, or did this happen while making the shoe (which is what it looks like to me)?

 

AppleMark

 

Those look spectacular. Congratulations on the shoes! Unlike other walnut shells I've seen posted, this looks almost exactly like walnut calf. I'm impressed!

post #26352 of 47027

The Mora 2.0 is finally up on the website!

 

post #26353 of 47027
Quote:
Originally Posted by shartmann View Post

I have always really liked the walnut Clifton, and can spot it in a Nordstroms from a section away. I ended up getting a pair of walnut Strands instead, but thought I would get a pair of Cliftons at some point. So when Mr. Grangaard made his offer for MTO shoes, walnut shell Clifton was my choice. I really like these and think the color is just about perfect, and if I could I would replace many of my shoes with walnut shell. The rest of my AE's should be feeling a bit nervous, as I plan to wear these a lot.
Those are awesome! Wish I knew about these walnut MTOs since I would totally have ordered a pair of Bayfields. I assume these MTOs for walnut shell are no longer offered?

Light shell is tricky because my experience is they tend to darken in time so maybe they will go away... however, that is a risk though.
post #26354 of 47027
post #26355 of 47027

Shaker Heights also looks great.

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