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Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread - Page 1344

post #20146 of 52503
I've posted earlier in the thread about my trouble with the 5 last and since it's been brought up recently again I thought I'd chime in. I was originally sized at 8D but there wasn't one in stock and it was clear 8.5D was too big so we ordered and I received my 8D a few weeks later and while the left (larger foot by a good amount) seemed to fit okay, the right was loose. I went to another local AE store (Boston guy here so I'm lucky) and was sized at 7.5E so did an exchange. They seemed perfect in the store but now having worn them seven or eight times when my feet swell later in the day my small toes get cramped by the angle of the last.

I'm not sure what to do and I have another pair on order in 7.5E. The sales rep is very nice and said he would work with me and recommended I wear them about a dozen times first. The thing that's tough is in the morning they tend to feel great and the smaller right foot is even slightly loose. But at times they just aren't as comfortable as they should be. Most of the shoes I like from AE are on the 5 so if it's not for me I'll probably start looking elsewhere.

Let me ask you guys... The salesman offered to stretch them for me. What kind of negative effect might that have (if any). Will it help? I wonder if I should go 7.5EEE or back to the 8D or even 8E. When I tried the 7.5EEE it just seemed too wide especially on the smaller foot. There seemed to be so much extra leather but that was also early in the morning before any swelling.

Thanks, all.

EDIT: I should also mention that when I went back in after wearing the 7.5E about 5-6 times the salesman got down, pinched and poked a few times and said that he was certain that this was the right size for me and to give it a few more wears. Also, I'm talking calf skin not cordovan.
Edited by AdamAdam - 4/30/13 at 5:34pm
post #20147 of 52503

Take this for what it's worth, but if you have not done so previously you really should give the team at Jefferson a call. There is maybe an hour left on this sale and as usual they went above and beyond my expectations.

 

On Saturday I ordered the Lubbock (from Kelsey) and tonight I spoke with Monica to ask about the Lubbock's general sizing. In addition to talking about the Lubbock she found me a pair of Banchory that I have been wanting and she still took the time to go over their belts as well.

 

I have dealt with them a half dozen times and they will continue to be the store I order from.

post #20148 of 52503
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Copeland View Post

Oh I understand - but I was just inquiring because both pictures show leather color that looks the same - so much the same that the Longbranch color "looks" like the Chili in the Dalton picture.

 

Dark Brown = Chili?

 

I'm really late in commenting on this but I was too busy at the time and then I forgot.  What I really wanted to comment on was, and I'm probably OCDing here, I don't believe that AE's picture of the "burnished chili" Dalton (that was on sale for $299 recently) is really a picture of a real burnished chili Dalton.  I think it's a picture of the walnut calf Dalton that has been modified with software to look like chili.

 

Why do I say that?  Well, I placed an order for those Daltons and having no AE chili colored shoes, I wanted to get a better feel for the exact color I'm going to receive.  I started looking at the picture very carefully and noticed that it was the exact same picture as the walnut calf Dalton except for the shade of the color.  Both pictures had the same shadows, markings, creases and the angle of the picture was exactly the same.  I was disappointed when I discovered that. The chili Dalton's picture isn't up there anymore but it's still back a few pages in this thread.

 

I wouldn't bet my life on my claim above but I'd bet some serious money on it. 

post #20149 of 52503

Can anyone tell me who we are supposed to contact in regards to getting the custom order shoes without the custom upcharge as per Mr. Grangaard's post earlier in this thread? Tried searching but wasn't able to come across the post without really digging. Thanks!

post #20150 of 52503
Quote:
Originally Posted by BootSpell View Post

 

I'm really late in commenting on this but I was too busy at the time and then I forgot.  What I really wanted to comment on was, and I'm probably OCDing here, I don't believe that AE's picture of the "burnished chili" Dalton (that was on sale for $299 recently) is really a picture of a real burnished chili Dalton.  I think it's a picture of the walnut calf Dalton that has been modified with software to look like chili.

 

Why do I say that?  Well, I placed an order for those Daltons and having no AE chili colored shoes, I wanted to get a better feel for the exact color I'm going to receive.  I started looking at the picture very carefully and noticed that it was the exact same picture as the walnut calf Dalton except for the shade of the color.  Both pictures had the same shadows, markings, creases and the angle of the picture was exactly the same.  I was disappointed when I discovered that. The chili Dalton's picture isn't up there anymore but it's still back a few pages in this thread.

 

I wouldn't bet my life on my claim above but I'd bet some serious money on it. 

You are about to receive by Fedex the proof.  By all means, post a picture so that we can see what they are selling with that photo.

post #20151 of 52503
Quote:
Originally Posted by New Shoes1 View Post

 

So, let me get this straight, your argument is based on one poster's anecdotal experience.  Yet, you are questioning whether we should listen to recognized experts due to your speculation that they just give the public what they want as opposed to doing what they believe is right?  tinfoil.gif

As you have found, our good friend Tristan does appear to avoid posting the more rigorous, scientific, and controlled evaluations by more renown professionals who work with these products day in and day out.  One visit (or email of pictures) to Nick's shop in Manhattan would dispel many anecdotal experiences.

post #20152 of 52503
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Copeland View Post

As you have found, our good friend Tristan does appear to avoid posting the more rigorous, scientific, and controlled evaluations by more renown professionals who work with these products day in and day out.  One visit (or email of pictures) to Nick's shop in Manhattan would dispel many anecdotal experiences.

i'm certainly making no judgement call on whether or not Saphir is good or bad, can damage shoes over time, nor not.  just pointing out the issue that the other member had with it so we can all be aware of it. it may be something to watch out for.  

 

i do however think Saphir products are way overpriced and don't give a benefit commensurate with the high price vs. other comparable options. 

 

also, does a visit to a shoe repair shop really constitute "rigorous, scientific, controlled evaluation"? using this logic, one could argue that Saphir sucks because it's not being used by the vast majority of shoe repair and shoe shine locations nationwide.


Edited by mediahound - 4/30/13 at 7:43pm
post #20153 of 52503
I have always used saphir after receiving numerous recommendations to do so. I acknowledge that quite often on these threads people are susceptible to group think. That being said my local purveyor of fine mens shoes recommended it to me as well, he uses it for all of his and his customers eg's. I defer to those I believe to have extensive knowledge on a subject (not just as it relates shoes). It's also quite possible that someone treated their shoes with something either prior to or following the use of saphir reno. I guess one would have to determine if saphir was the sole reason for causing damage to a particular shoe. I would think that if saphir had some sort of flawed formula it would not be so widely used.
post #20154 of 52503
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cold Iron View Post

Heads up.

 

Today is the last day of the Jeffersonville Outlet store sale of 20% off one item. 

 

740-948-9033

jville@allenedmonds.com

 

Open tonight until 9 PM EST

 

And they have several pairs of burgundy shell Patriots in my size in the system to go with my brown shell pair. And like bucksfan said they feel like a house slipper..... decisions.gif

 

 

 

Cold Iron,

On a different topic, I just ordered some of the amazon microfiber cloths that I've been told you  and some others have used.  I believe I understand that you use them primarily to buff after applying polish (or brushing your shell, etc.), but I was curious as to whether you use them for anything else in the process of caring for your shoes.

 

For example, have you ever used them in the first step of the Mac Method to dampen and wipe down your shell before brushing?  Or to apply RevoV or RenoM, or Alden Waterproofer on shell (something I recently started doing as the final step in my shell care)? 


Others are welcome to chime in, of course.

Thanks.

post #20155 of 52503
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post

i'm certainly making no judgement call on whether or not Saphir is good or bad, can damage shoes over time, nor not.  just pointing out the issue that the other member had with it so we can all be aware of it. it may be something to watch out for.   

Thank you, Tristan, for adding your tip.  

 

I agree - that because Patrick had posted his issue with Saphir - that as a customer, I am going to be more watchful for the next few years in making sure I do not overuse the Saphir products.  I have already spent a great deal of time reading the web instructions at numerous Saphir retail sites - and use of the entire 5-step process is more likely geared to professional shoe shops and shiners - who make it their business to properly use the products as designed.  

 

It goes without saying - that many of us just want to bypass B Nelson Shoes in Manhattan or other shops who we would pay to maintain our shoes - by making an investment in the same professional products - but without the professional training to use them.

 

I remember years ago a friend with curly hair wanted to save money by buying hair straightener himself at the local beauty supply store - rather than paying a licensed professional to apply the chemical to his hair.  In the end, he SAVED lots of money, but he permanently damaged his hair as the chemical burned away.

 

So . . .again, thanks for the heads up.  I will be that more vigilant in the proper use of the 5-Step Saphir Process.


David

post #20156 of 52503
Quote:
Originally Posted by frogwash View Post


It's just about not buying "anything at the store. While the store may or may not come out ahead, depending on how much time is spent there and what is purchased, that's not really the whole point. It's about the salesperson--who is there trying to earn a living. That person earns a commission by providing a service and assisting you with your purchase of right pair of shoes. It's not right to spend several hours of the shoe specialist's time so that all your future online orders from somewhere else or even someone else at the same company are perfect. It is the sales professional's duty to assist you to ensure that your purchase best suits your needs and wants. But going in with the notebook and then buying a shirt in another department has not only taken the shoeperson's time from him or her, but all the time going over every last has also taken away the opportunity to earn money to provide for his or her family because he is unable to help another customer who is there to buy shoes.
Sure. So, if you build a good rapport, you're really going to go back to that specific person when you are ready to purchase? Then you are one of the exceptions to the norm. While it sounds good, for the majority of people, they will say that this is what they are going to do, but when the time comes they will rationalize it away and then just order online. The people at the Alden stores were true professionals by showing enthusiasm with assisting you. Their boss probably also requires that they help all customers, even those that state they are not going to buy there. They were probably also hoping that their service to you would end up in a sale, but don't be surprised if there was some resentment and their professionalism prevented them from showing it.

Well, you really started a s**t storm.  What part of my earlier revised post did you not read??

 

For your enjoyment, here it is again:

 

Quote:
"And because different styles may predict a completely different size - I think I will take along a notebook to Nordstroms and try on every style that strikes my fancy - buy what I can within my current budget - and then know what other styles and exact sizes I want in the future - so that when I return to Montana and am ready to purchase again,  I can either call the Nordstroms sales rep and order over the phone - or use the Nordstroms or AE online buying with the correct fit."

 

Truly, the above said nothing about buying a shirt within my budget.  Rather - buying SHOES within my budget - with a phone call later to the same sales rep to BUY OVER THE PHONE.

 

And yes, Nordstroms Shoe Department employee do work for a commission of about 6.75% (or about $24 to $34 per AE pair of shoes).  I love developing good relationships with those who sell me quality goods and treat me well - and I will always make an effort to repay them with future sales orders.

 

All my best,

 

David

post #20157 of 52503

That looks like an oil stain to me.  Did you receive them like that?  If it's oil that's been absorbed into the leather, then I don't think there is much you can do about that.  Probably your best bet is to take a slightly darker polish and blend in the color on both shoes. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by robbrechter View Post

Have this dark blotch on the top of my Bourbon Strand. I've tried Reno'Mat to remove the polish on there thinking it was just a bad polish job, then I tried Renovateur and some more Reno'Mat, then I added a new layer of Saphir cream polish, etc. but nothing worked. As soon as I applied any sort of product to it, it would immediately get very dark until the leather dried, and then it ends up just sort of dark. It doesn't resemble the burnishing on the rest of the shoe, so I don't think that's what it is (unless it's just a bad burnishing job). I just applied a coat of Walnut polish to the area to see if it would help even things out. This is what I ended up with:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)





 



Any suggestions on how to minimize the problem? I know maybe no one else will notice during daily wear, but it's bothering the heck out of me. They're seconds, so I don't plan to return them -- I just want them to look their best.
post #20158 of 52503
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbrechter View Post

Have this dark blotch on the top of my Bourbon Strand. I've tried Reno'Mat to remove the polish on there thinking it was just a bad polish job, then I tried Renovateur and some more Reno'Mat, then I added a new layer of Saphir cream polish, etc. but nothing worked. As soon as I applied any sort of product to it, it would immediately get very dark until the leather dried, and then it ends up just sort of dark. It doesn't resemble the burnishing on the rest of the shoe, so I don't think that's what it is (unless it's just a bad burnishing job). I just applied a coat of Walnut polish to the area to see if it would help even things out. This is what I ended up with:






Any suggestions on how to minimize the problem? I know maybe no one else will notice during daily wear, but it's bothering the heck out of me. They're seconds, so I don't plan to return them -- I just want them to look their best.

 

Rob,

 

I have a very similar style and color as you do (in fact, I have three of the same shoe so I rotate them at the office - where I share a similar profession as you do).

 

What you appear to have is certainly correctible - and I would suggest you determine if you want to make the correction yourself - or have a Saphir professional make the correction.

 

You mentioned this may have happened as a "bad polish job".  Did you polish them yourself (which could be helpful in determine where the mishap started) or did someone else touch the shoes?

 

You can also email the above pictures (plus what you wrote) to both of the following professionals (Nick and Kirby):

 

nick@bnelsonshoes.com

 

and

 

kirbya@hangerproject.com

 

Both of the above professionals (known nationwide) can certainly provide you with the right remedy.

 

For myself, I am going to be using the 5-Step Saphir Process for one of my shoes, which includes a missing step in what you wrote.  Let me know if you'd like me to share that with you in a more appropriate thread topic here.


David

post #20159 of 52503
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbrechter View Post

Have this dark blotch on the top of my Bourbon Strand. I've tried Reno'Mat to remove the polish on there thinking it was just a bad polish job, then I tried Renovateur and some more Reno'Mat, then I added a new layer of Saphir cream polish, etc. but nothing worked. As soon as I applied any sort of product to it, it would immediately get very dark until the leather dried, and then it ends up just sort of dark. It doesn't resemble the burnishing on the rest of the shoe, so I don't think that's what it is (unless it's just a bad burnishing job). I just applied a coat of Walnut polish to the area to see if it would help even things out. This is what I ended up with:






Any suggestions on how to minimize the problem? I know maybe no one else will notice during daily wear, but it's bothering the heck out of me. They're seconds, so I don't plan to return them -- I just want them to look their best.
Pretty sure thats an oil stain , probably dripped off a piece of machinary in the factory, pretty sure theres nothing you can do about it . Pretty sure it will lessen with time .Pretty sure you wont even know its there in a couple months
post #20160 of 52503
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pastor View Post

I have some VSC as well and use it at times. I don't get as good a shine with it as I do with the reno. I bought the VSC on Nick Horween's recommendation and use it before I store my shoes for the season (like I just did with my boots). I'll also admit that most of the time I do't use anything on my shell shoes except a brush. Only when they are dirty or start getting scuffs will I break out the various products. For calf I mostly brush and then apply Saphir wax polish as needed.

Our care for shell and shoes is pretty much identical. I purchase VSC from the AE outlets for $5 a bottle. In the thread I mentioned earlier I posted that I will give up my Reno when they pry it from my cold dead hands. That is a bit of an extreme statement but if it was the last jar on earth I wouldn't give it up without a fight LOL. 75 degrees yesterday but cold and up to half a foot of snow today and a few more inches tomorrow. I will be thankful when I can put away my winter wear for the year!

Quote:
Originally Posted by bespoken pa View Post

Decided not to buy the chili Daltons, today I received an email from AE swat. The only question is walnut or cappacino? Thoughts gentlemen?

Well both of course... devil.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by PK35216 View Post

Cold Iron,

On a different topic, I just ordered some of the amazon microfiber cloths that I've been told you  and some others have used.  I believe I understand that you use them primarily to buff after applying polish (or brushing your shell, etc.), but I was curious as to whether you use them for anything else in the process of caring for your shoes.

 

For example, have you ever used them in the first step of the Mac Method to dampen and wipe down your shell before brushing?  Or to apply RevoV or RenoM, or Alden Waterproofer on shell (something I recently started doing as the final step in my shell care)? 


Others are welcome to chime in, of course.

Thanks.

I still use T-shirts for applying wax and polishing. After years of doing so I know the feel I am looking for when polishing and only use a very little bit of wax at a time, I have a hard time getting use to the feel of anything else. For applying Alden Waterproofer I use an old synthetic sock that doesn't absorb much of it but transfers it to the shoe rather well. Originally I used the MF cloths for just final buffing. Previously I used nylon stockings for final polish however they always did leave swirl marks, had to look close but they were there. MF cloths do not. I use the MF cloths around the house for cleaning and also for cleaning the vehicle inside and out as they really pick up dirt and are something like 8X more absorbent than cotton. When I was cleaning a new pair of shell PA in the garage I did the first pass with Reno and a T-shirt and glanced at the MF cloths I used for cleaning the vehicle and thought I'd try one on a second pass.

 

The blue MF cloth is after I had already cleaned with the T-shirt and Reno. So I now use them for the Mac method, Reno and cleaning, and final buffing.

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