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Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread - Page 1287

post #19291 of 53425
Paul,

In my opinion, Allen Edmonds represents the finest value in high end men's shoes on the market today. I have just purchased a pair of Regent wing tips during the current sale for $167 and this is an incredible price. I now own over 10 pairs of AE and am building up quite a collection. I won't even look at other brands like Cole-Haan that have gone over seas. Not only are your shoes great looking, but I feel good knowing that I am helping in a small way to employ Americans in an industry that had almost died out in this country. Thank you

Charles
post #19292 of 53425
Quote:
Originally Posted by masernaut View Post

Can anyone help define what the numbers stamped inside a shoe mean? I know the size and width is listed (in this case 15 A), but what about the rest?




The only one I can help with is that 5904 is the model number and 4 at the end of the model number indicates it is on the 4 last.

Chris
post #19293 of 53425
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenEdmondsCEO View Post

Greetings MediaHound–

I’ve been meaning to respond to your “disingenuous” (a strong word) comment for several days but I’ve been tied up.

**********

All of this growth is made possible entirely because of the loyalty and support of our customers, including the opinion-leaders in this forum. We wouldn’t risk their trust in us by being disingenuous, and it’s not in our culture or our ethics to do so purposely. Our glued-on rubber-soled shoes are made in construction methods that we don’t have in Wisconsin. We can’t compete with our high-end welted construction plant against the India and China manufacturers of those kind of low-complication shoes that sell for $150 or less (or much less). We don’t want to forfeit that huge part of the shoe business, however, so we’ve joined in. If our shoes are made in the DR, though, we clearly state that fact in our catalogues, online and in the shoes. We specifically use a sub-brand (“ae by Allen Edmonds”) for our DR shoes, in fact, to be even more clear. Here’s a link to our bestselling DR shoe, the “Boulder”. See if you think we’re hiding something (note the final bullet point in the product description)...

http://www.allenedmonds.com/aeonline/producti_SF71801_1_40000000001_-1

So, I now ask you…. Do we still reasonably differ, or are you convinced?

Paul

I have many pairs of Allen Edmonds shoes (and some Bourbon Strands on the way as a matter of fact). My Dad introduced me to AE and I introduced my son to AE. Allen Edmonds has it roots here in the USA and they still have a big presence in the USA - if you read the book on the history of Allen Edmonds I think you will get a better feel for this. They are even selling shoes in China that are made in the USA - a new twist on world matters I am glad to see. I don't care if 100% of everythinng they produce is made in the USA, I know a vast majority of what they do is here in the USA and they provide many jobs (production, marketing, sales, support, etc.) here in the USA. I appreciate that.

I know not all Ford and Chevrolet cars are 100% made in the USA, but I don't think many would disagree that these are Amercian car companies.

I consider Allen Edmonds an American shoe company and I will continue to support them with my purchases. I feel good knowing my purchases are supporting a lot of jobs all across this country (as well as some other countries).

Thank you Paul for participating in this forum.

Chris
post #19294 of 53425
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenEdmondsCEO View Post

Greetings MediaHound–

I’ve been meaning to respond to your “disingenuous” (a strong word) comment for several days but I’ve been tied up.

[Speaking of time constraints, I want express apologies and thanks for your patience to those SF Members who sent special make-up shoe requests to me a couple weeks ago. I should have been smarter about making an offer like that while I was on vacation with family before heading right into a couple of especially busy weeks (including the visit with Jack Nicklaus at Augusta – please see my blog at http://allenedmondsblog.blogspot.com/, if you like golf and the Masters). We now have developed a process internally to respond to your requests on an expedited basis.]

Back to the rationale for our use of the tagline “The Great American Shoe Company” and its sincerity. For the reasons I’m about to outline below, I feel that it’s appropriate even more strongly today than 3 years ago when we adopted it. Reasonable men can differ, as is often said. There’s likely a difference of opinion between us as to what it means to be “Great American”. For you, it must mean that 100% of the shoe manufacturing must start and end in the USA. That’s a tough hurdle to clear – to begin with, fine calfskin and other premium leather components are only available from Europe, as are many high quality rubber soles, so we start from the get-go with an international process. Of the 212 steps that it takes to make our welted shoes, only the first few on the upper are done in the DR (as I explained in detail in the post previously cited above). What arrives as a flat, half-sewn and open-ended “upper” in Port Washington for our welts, is nothing remotely close to being wearable. All of our insoles are cut to each specific length and width in Wisconsin, then prepped for being teamed with the corresponding lasts and the uppers, many of which uppers were made entirely in Port Washington as well. Once the upper is started in either factory, the entire rest of the process to turn leather into shoe occurs just on the other side of the wall from my desk.

Making shoes this way gets to the first attributes of “Great American” that I’ll mention – being approachable, unpretentious and democratic. (“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal….” is central to our corporate culture.) I want our shoes to be affordable for the ex-urban factory worker who wants to look good in his one suit as well as for the sharply-dressed chairman of a Fortune 100 board in a large city. Among the Brits, Alden and a couple factories in Continental Europe that also are the only makers of superior quality, classic Goodyear-welted shoes, only Allen Edmonds regularly sells first quality products for less than $350, let alone the below-$250 offerings we have going right now in our Anniversary Sale.

Our great country at its best has gone above and beyond the call of duty; we do the tough things that other countries don’t and the world has often been much the better for it. At Allen Edmonds, our customer service people (as so many of you have remarked in this thread) follow that example. We also are flexible and responsive to special requests in an American can-do kind of way. We’re quick on delivery (usually), too, as our production line is right in the middle of the country where shipping is easier. Who else delivers Goodyear-welted, team-colored WebGems on short-order for $199 during March Madness?

Our 46 proprietary stores are in Great American cities from New York, Boston (our Newberry Street store is two blocks from the bombings), Philly, Washington DC, Atlanta and Orlando… to Denver, Phoenix, Los Angeles and San Francisco; from Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Chicago and Cleveland to Kansas City, St. Louis (opening Wednesday), Houston, Dallas and New Orleans.

We’ve partnered with two of the greatest American golfing icons of all time in Jack Nicklaus and Ben Crenshaw. Ben Hogan’s famous extra-spike shoes were made in our plant. We’ve outfitted the last two Ryder Cup teams with their dress shoes for the opening and closing ceremonies. We’re a business partner of Major League Baseball and on the feet of MLB’s executives in New York. We’ve done the shoes for countless Hollywood movies. Stars on SNL, network news and late night TV often stop in our Rock Center store before their appearances. Author Michael Lewis personally wrote a tribute to AE for our “90 Stories for 90 Years” Anniversary Book last year. Bestselling historian David McCullough stops in our Boston store and does a jig in his new shoes for our store manager. My nephew spotted the original “Shaft” Richard Roundtree at a film festival in Minneapolis and complimented him on his AE Strands – to which Shaft said, “Thanks. They’re my favorite shoes.” And every President from at least Reagan to W wore Allen Edmonds with his right hand raised for the Oath on Inauguration Day, and President Obama wears them also. We have photos with my predecessor of, and/or complimentary handwritten notes from, each (save the current POTUS) on our wall. We’re the shoe of American leaders – from the Oval Office to the corner office to the principal’s office.

We’ve worked with America’s allies for decades. Our main calfskin suppliers are in Germany and France, our main leather sole supplier in Turkey. Our Verona, Urbino and Firenze styles are made by family-owned partner plants in small towns in Italy, and are top 40 sellers for us. We bring our Milwaukee corporate culture to our people in Santiago in the DR, where several of my leadership colleagues and I go every year to serve a Holiday Feast to the workers (we man the buffet line) and to thank them for their hard work and high quality. They work for us exclusively. I’m proud of the jobs and economic vitality that we create there – investing in our hemisphere, just a few hundred miles from Florida’s coast, in a democratic nation just a narrow channel away from the oppression in Cuba and sharing the same island with impoverished Haiti where Columbus first landed in the New World. We’re good diplomats.

Speaking of job creation – our price/value relationship in our shoes has allowed us to grow employment significantly in the U.S. We’ve added about 270 U.S. jobs in the past 2+years and it continues apace. Our production census is up about 50%. Employment in our other critical functions -- including new product development, customer service, shipping, marketing, retail management, finance and store personnel – has grown at least as much, with some more than doubling. Our New England heel base supplier recently told me that our growth has caused his family-owned company to increase their employment by over 25%.

As many of SFers know, we’ve expanded into small and large leather goods in our stores and we’re adding clothing in growing sku counts. Our Massachusetts wallet-maker is nearing the point where he can put his long-mothballed production line back into operation. Our briefcase and bags-making partner in the South has moved production back onshore to meet our Made in USA stipulation. We’ve partnered with tailored clothing, ties and custom shirt manufacturers on the East Coast to make those items also to our specifications for us (our team of designers choose the patterns and fabrics – we have decades-experienced clothing design professionals working for us now). If we’re as successful as I hope with those products, these suppliers’ U.S. employment will also grow significantly. And our business with Skip Horween and his fourth generation tannery in Chicago has burgeoned.

All of this growth is made possible entirely because of the loyalty and support of our customers, including the opinion-leaders in this forum. We wouldn’t risk their trust in us by being disingenuous, and it’s not in our culture or our ethics to do so purposely. Our glued-on rubber-soled shoes are made in construction methods that we don’t have in Wisconsin. We can’t compete with our high-end welted construction plant against the India and China manufacturers of those kind of low-complication shoes that sell for $150 or less (or much less). We don’t want to forfeit that huge part of the shoe business, however, so we’ve joined in. If our shoes are made in the DR, though, we clearly state that fact in our catalogues, online and in the shoes. We specifically use a sub-brand (“ae by Allen Edmonds”) for our DR shoes, in fact, to be even more clear. Here’s a link to our bestselling DR shoe, the “Boulder”. See if you think we’re hiding something (note the final bullet point in the product description)...

http://www.allenedmonds.com/aeonline/producti_SF71801_1_40000000001_-1

So, I now ask you…. Do we still reasonably differ, or are you convinced?

Paul
 

 

 

I'm reading a ton of rhetoric in your post with very little addressing of the point of: why do you talk so much about your USA plant all over your website, yet so little about your DR plant on your website/blogs? Especially if the DR plant is something you are proud of?

 

I even looked through all of your press releases going back to 2003 here: http://www.allenedmonds.com/aeonline/PressReleasesView?langId=-1&storeId=1&catalogId=40000000001

 

I see zero mention of your Dominican Republic plant at all.  You didn't even do a press release for it's opening in 2007...


Edited by mediahound - 4/22/13 at 10:01am
post #19295 of 53425
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 
 

 

 

I'm reading a ton of rhetoric in your post with very little addressing of the point of: why do you talk so much about your USA plant all over your website, yet so little about your DR plant on your website/blogs? Especially if the DR plant is something you are proud of?

OK, so that's twice you make inflammatory remarks about AE in an appreciation forum.  Paul was kind enough to respond to you, and you repay that with calling it "rhetoric"?  Even if you don't agree with his points, you should still be polite, as he was to you.  The thrust of Allen Edmonds is "The Great American Shoe Company."  Paul has demonstrated how much of AE contributes to the country both in jobs and supporting industries.  Even if components come from somewhere else, they are all assembled in the US, and thus qualify as American to me.  Show some respect.

post #19296 of 53425
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenEdmondsCEO View Post

 We specifically use a sub-brand (“ae by Allen Edmonds”) for our DR shoes, in fact, to be even more clear.  

Paul

1)  Paul, is this the only forum you participate on?  And is this the only thread/topic you can be found in?

 

I remain a devoted customer with AE, starting many years ago when I made my first purchase at Nordstroms for a perfect fit.  But with last night's purchase at your web site, I was asked to complete an online AE survey, in which it asked for improvements.  The main improvement I listed was the ability to interact with AE (either at the AE site or here) so that we can pose questions about AE products, services, maintenance, and styles without going through the email or phone method.

 

2)  I did not know about the DR line you offer, so I took a peek just now and was AMAZED to see a DR shoe design that I can no longer get (the Sanford) titled "The Oxford".  But when I clicked the DR oxford, I was dismayed to see the shoe has rubber tires on the soles (which probably serves a great need for those who wish it).  I would have snapped them up if they had the traditional famous leather AE soles and heal - but it was not to be.  And the Strand Last is quite different than the Sanford Last.  (When my Sanfords needed replacement and AE no longer offered the Sanford, I was sold a Lexington - which I have grown to dislike over the years).

 

Your AE website still carries the AE official review on the Sanford (which confuses me even more in that - if the Sanford was so popular in sales, then why discontinue it?):

 

AE Quote:

 

 

"Sanford - Cap-toe Lace-up Oxford Men's Dress Shoes by Allen Edmonds.
 
"This shoe is a closeout style, and is therefore limited to the sizes and widths that are currently available online. 
 
"Believe it or not, once and a while even we make mistakes - like discontinuing this shoe after offering it for more than 15 years. But thanks to our loyal customers, who asked for its return more than any other shoe, we brought back this classic in 2010 and now it is more popular than ever. 
 
"The high demand is no doubt a result of combining its more versitile blucher style with the business-ready brogue detail and a dressed up cap-toe. Comfort also plays a big role in its success given that we designed this model to fit a little bit wider through the ball of the foot - meaning the Sanford ideally suits broader feet or ones with higher insteps or arches. 
 
"So there you have it: versatile style plus comfort equals a shoe that is close to perfect, even if we aren't. Click any link below to view similar styles: Leather sole men's lace-up oxford dress shoes Cap-toe blucher with brogue perforations and medallion Part of the ' Timeless Classics Collection' of premium men's shoes Lined premium calfskin leather upper Single oak leather sole 360 degree Goodyear welted construction."
 
3)  With the much talked about Saphir polish and maintenance products (using mink oil and other outstanding ingredients to get a far more superior masked shoe shine to return the look of the shoes to the original out-of-the-box quality), will AE be considering upgrading their polish products in this regard?  (When I called AE support they knew nothing about the Saphir line, even though it is becoming quite the recommended product above all else)
 
Thank you for serving us as the CEO for Allen Edmonds, which carries the weight of many considerations,
 
David Copeland 

Edited by David Copeland - 4/22/13 at 7:54pm
post #19297 of 53425
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Copeland View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
1)  Paul, is this the only forum you participate on?  And is this the only thread/topic you can be found in?

I remain a devoted customer with AE, starting many years ago when I made my first purchase at Nordstroms for a perfect fit.  But with last night's purchase at your web site, I was asked to complete an online AE survey, in which it asked for improvements.  The main improvement I listed was the ability to interact with AE (either at the AE site or here) so that we can pose questions about AE products, services, maintenance, and styles without going through the email or phone method.

2)  I did not know about the DR line you offer, so I took a peek just now and was AMAZED to see a DR shoe design that I can no longer get (the Sanford) titled "The Oxford".  But when I clicked the DR oxford, I was dismayed to see the shoe has rubber tires on the soles (which probably serves a great need for those who wish it).  I would have snapped them up if they had the traditional famous leather AE soles and heal - but it was not to be.  And the Strand Last is quite different than the Sanford Last.  (When my Sanfords needed replacement and AE no longer offered the Sanford, I was sold a Lexington - which I have grown to dislike over the years).

Your AE website still carries the AE official review on the Sanford (which confuses me even more in that - if the Sanford was so popular in sales, then why discontinue it?):

AE Quote:


"Sanford - Cap-toe Lace-up Oxford Men's Dress Shoes by Allen Edmonds.
 
"This shoe is a closeout style, and is therefore limited to the sizes and widths that are currently available online. 
 
"Believe it or not, once and a while even we make mistakes - like discontinuing this shoe after offering it for more than 15 years. But thanks to our loyal customers, who asked for its return more than any other shoe, we brought back this classic in 2010 and now it is more popular than ever. 
 
"The high demand is no doubt a result of combining its more versitile blucher style with the business-ready brogue detail and a dressed up cap-toe. Comfort also plays a big role in its success given that we designed this model to fit a little bit wider through the ball of the foot - meaning the Sanford ideally suits broader feet or ones with higher insteps or arches. 
 
"So there you have it: versatile style plus comfort equals a shoe that is close to perfect, even if we aren't. Click any link below to view similar styles: Leather sole men's lace-up oxford dress shoes Cap-toe blucher with brogue perforations and medallion Part of the ' Timeless Classics Collection' of premium men's shoes Lined premium calfskin leather upper Single oak leather sole 360 degree Goodyear welted construction."
 
3)  With the much talked about Saphir polish and maintenance products (using mink oil and other outstanding ingredients to get a far more superior masked shoe shine to return the look of the shoes to the original out-of-the-box quality), will AE be considering upgrading their polish products in this regard?  (When I called AE support they knew nothing about the Saphir line, even though it is becoming quite the recommended product above all else)
 
Thank you for serving us as the CEO for Allen Edmonds, which carries the weight of many considerations,
 
David Copeland 

To your point #1, they do have a Live Chat option on their website that I've used in the past when waiting for a pair of shoes to be delivered and it was very helpful...
post #19298 of 53425
Quote:
Originally Posted by mediahound View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 
 

 

 

I'm reading a ton of rhetoric in your post with very little addressing of the point of: why do you talk so much about your USA plant all over your website, yet so little about your DR plant on your website/blogs? Especially if the DR plant is something you are proud of?

 

I even looked through all of your press releases going back to 2003 here: http://www.allenedmonds.com/aeonline/PressReleasesView?langId=-1&storeId=1&catalogId=40000000001

 

I see zero mention of your Dominican Republic plant at all.  You didn't even do a press release for it's opening in 2007...

Rhetoric? OK lets deal with some facts then. The only reason you came over here to start with is someone posted on the Alden thread that AE had a selection of suede shoes more reasonably priced than Alden which are $500. So you and several others came to the AE Appreciation thread, and several have stayed and are looking at other AE offerings. Which I think is great. You picked up a pair for ~$200 IIRC and said you get what you pay for. No you got more than you paid for.

 

Paul has said before that he does not view Alden as a competitor but the made in China square toed bicycle shoes as his competitor. That is the market he is after. And he feels that most Americans are willing to pay up to $150 more for a made in American shoe. He has also expanded the company and the offerings to attract the younger generation which I have a feeling is someone like yourself.  In the process he has created more jobs for Americans.

 

When I retired from the military I spent the first 5 years in the manufacturing vertical doing business process workflow improvement consulting.  I have a pretty good idea of what he has had to go through to do all that he has done. And to offer you those suede shoes that you picked up at a fraction of the cost of those Aldens that you didn’t want to spend $500 on. And I’d like to add that Allen Edmonds is the only high end American shoe company to offer their shoes to the military through the Army and Air Force Exchange System.
 
While I was active duty if I thought one of my men wasn’t putting out 110% I would ask them “What have you done for my country today”. Once I retired from the military I lost the right to say that to any man. But I can tell you that is one question I would never have to ask the CEO of AE. He is doing and has done more than most.

post #19299 of 53425

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by polojock615 View Post

OK, so that's twice you make inflammatory remarks about AE in an appreciation forum.  Paul was kind enough to respond to you, and you repay that with calling it "rhetoric"?  Even if you don't agree with his points, you should still be polite, as he was to you.  The thrust of Allen Edmonds is "The Great American Shoe Company."  Paul has demonstrated how much of AE contributes to the country both in jobs and supporting industries.  Even if components come from somewhere else, they are all assembled in the US, and thus qualify as American to me.  Show some respect.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cold Iron View Post

The only reason you came over here to start with is someone posted on the Alden thread that AE had a selection of suede shoes more reasonably priced than Alden which are $500. 

1. It is rhetoric. Just be glad I didn't call it "BS" or something.

 

2. Huh? I've been here in this thread for years. Do a search or something. 

post #19300 of 53425

Can we please move on??? 

 

While Paul may be duty-bound to engage Mediahound the rest of us can just ignore his posts. 

post #19301 of 53425
can't someone ban MH for being an inconsiderate asshole?

ps please pardon my French, but if the shoe fits...
post #19302 of 53425
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenEdmondsCEO View Post

What arrives as a flat, half-sewn and open-ended “upper” in Port Washington for our welts, is nothing remotely close to being wearable.

So, I now ask you…. Do we still reasonably differ, or are you convinced?

Paul,

I would say that I reasonably differ with this assessment. I own tons of AEs, but I think that the question is whether the step that is being done in the DR is a significant part of the construction or not. Does the rubber for the heel or the leather have to be made in the US? No.

In this case, though, the part being done in the DR *is* very important. We're talking about intricately designed, brogued, neatly stitched shoes. Now, the DR factory, I gather, does a very fine job of this, and I love my AEs (most in seconds quality) and I think the value trade-off is absolutely acceptable for AE, on a corporate level and a quality level. No complaints from me on the actual decision to do this. But that is a very significant step being done in the DR, even if they're not remotely close to being wearable. If you watch AE videos, they focus on the skilled workers who are looking at the leather, choosing prime pieces, cutting them, perfing/brogue-ing them, and sewing them together into an upper. In fact, when people on this forum complain about problems with the size of the caps, mismatched caps, mismatched leather colors, gouges, slices, missed-stitches, blotches, etc., these are all this portion of the construction. Now I don't think these problems are too noticeable. But this potentially DR-produced step is a *huge* part of the process. I don't know how you can reasonably state that this is a minor part of their construction, especially since you play up how important it is in your promotional videos. From most consumers points of view, they are looking at detailing, stitching and beauty in their shoe.

I'd say this is akin to a bike manufacturer making the gears and frame in another country, and then saying it's not even close to being rideable until they put on wheels, a chain and handle bars in the US. All while saying "our frames and gears are expertly crafted, hand selected, and utterly insignificant to the construction of a bicycle." I do *not* consider that bike to be made in the USA.

I don't consider a pair of brogued wingtips that had their uppers made in the DR to be made in the USA. I do consider AE as a great american company, with top notch support, great prices and wonderful construction. I will still buy AEs as high quality shoes. But the place of construction is, in my opinion, *not* properly represented.

Added: Paul's response on this thread read like a marketing statement. One line dismissing the question, one stating that this part of the construction is insignificant, and then paragraphs pitching the golf line, the march madness webgem, locations of their stores, US Presidents, patriotism and the can-do spirit of American industrialism. He defended the use of the Made in Italy shoes, and the labeled "Made in DR "shoes. But he ignored the central question of whether the Made in USA shoes should be considered Made in USA. He is friendly, responsive, has great product initiatives, and also the CEO of a major company. He has responsibilities, and I'd be surprised if he gave a response that actually addressed a controversial question such as this.
Edited by wdahab - 4/22/13 at 11:44am
post #19303 of 53425
Quote:
Originally Posted by wdahab View Post


Paul,

I would say that I reasonably differ with this assessment. I own tons of AEs, but I think that the question is whether the step that is being done in the DR is a significant part of the construction or not. Does the rubber for the heel or the leather have to be made in the US? No.

In this case, though, the part being done in the DR *is* very important. We're talking about intricately designed, brogued, neatly stitched shoes. Now, the DR factory, I gather, does a very fine job of this, and I love my AEs (most in seconds quality) and I think the value trade-off is absolutely acceptable for AE. But that is a very significant step being done in the AE, even if they're not remotely close to being wearable. If you watch AE videos, they focus on the skilled workers who are looking at the leather, choosing prime pieces, cutting them, perfing/brogue-ing them, and sewing them together into an upper. In fact, when people on this forum complain about problems with the size of the caps, mismatched caps, mismatched leather colors, gouges, slices, missed-stitches, blotches, etc. all with the uppers in this portion of the construction. Now, I buy a lot of seconds, and I don't think these problems are too noticeable. But this potentially DR-produced step is a *huge* part of the process. But I don't know how you can reasonably state that this is a minor part of their construction. From most consumers points of view, who is looking at detailing, stitching and beauty in their shoe, this is a huge part of the construction process.

I'd say this is akin to a bike manufacturer making the gears and frame in another country, and then saying it's not even close to being rideable until they put on wheels, a chain and handle bars in the US. All while saying "our frames and gears are expertly crafted, hand selected, and utterly insignificant to the construction of a bicycle." I do *not* consider that bike to be made in the USA.

I don't consider a pair of brogued wingtips that had their uppers made in the DR to be made in the USA. I do consider AE as a great american company, with top notch support, great prices and wonderful construction. I will still buy AEs as high quality shoes. But the place of construction is, in my opinion, *not* properly represented.

Well said.

post #19304 of 53425
lurker[1].gif
post #19305 of 53425

I do not as yet own any AE shoes.

 

I have enjoyed reading this thread at length, and as a result have decided to make it a point to buy these shoes in the near future based on aesthetics, quality, and value.  

 

 

*Note to mediahound- it IS an Allen Edmonds APPRECIATION thread, not a political/socio-economic ethics debate- so I am pretty sure most people reading this would appreciate it if you would piss off. Start another thread, or just take it outside...

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