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Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread - Page 1236

post #18526 of 46863
Anyone know a place in downtown Toronto I can pick up some kiwi tan polish to shine my walnut strands? Tried Novelty Shoe but to no avail =(
post #18527 of 46863
Anyone have further commentary on the Butyl soles? Can you get them in single soles (e.g. could I recraft a pair of shoes with butyl without having to go with the double soles that are used on the boots)?

When I ordered my Daltons, I didn't realize there was even anything different--just thought they had colored the sole to match the rest of the boot...but then I realized that even when the sole scuffs on things, it doesn't reveal layers of normal looking leather and I looked it up and realized it was the butyl leather sole. It didn't say what that meant but over the past winter, I have noticed that they do seem to do very well with wet streets. I don't end up with wet socks after walking around in the rain.

Figured this might be mostly because of the double sole taking longer to soak through but I found this quote from AE customer service:
Quote:
The Dalton features our Butyl Double Leather Sole, which is Butyl soaked, resulting in a high resiliency to water. Butyl is actually a chemical in which some rubbers are derived; butyl rubber is known for its leak-proof qualities.

So that explains it. Are there any downsides to this? Seems like the best of both worlds--you get a true leather sole, but you get a large amount of the water resistance of a rubber sole. Its not like it is an ugly color--I think it would actually do great on the bottom of some black park avenues (assuming it is available in a single leather sole).
post #18528 of 46863
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Anyone have further commentary on the Butyl soles? Can you get them in single soles (e.g. could I recraft a pair of shoes with butyl without having to go with the double soles that are used on the boots)?

When I ordered my Daltons, I didn't realize there was even anything different--just thought they had colored the sole to match the rest of the boot...but then I realized that even when the sole scuffs on things, it doesn't reveal layers of normal looking leather and I looked it up and realized it was the butyl leather sole. It didn't say what that meant but over the past winter, I have noticed that they do seem to do very well with wet streets. I don't end up with wet socks after walking around in the rain.

Figured this might be mostly because of the double sole taking longer to soak through but I found this quote from AE customer service:
So that explains it. Are there any downsides to this? Seems like the best of both worlds--you get a true leather sole, but you get a large amount of the water resistance of a rubber sole. Its not like it is an ugly color--I think it would actually do great on the bottom of some black park avenues (assuming it is available in a single leather sole).

 

Though the AE website says others, I believe the Neumok has single butyl soles. See this very informative post from MoneyWellSpent for more information.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

 

I wouldn't want to make any dogmatic guarantees that they are all single sole, but they sure look like single soles to me.  If it is a double sole, it is a THIN double sole. [...]

 

Oak is the traditional tanning agent for leather soles due to it's resilient nature, hard yet flexible characteristics that make it good for shoe soles.  It has been in use for centuries.  The butyl soles are simply based on the idea that oil and water don't mix smile.gif so if you soak the leather in the oil, it will be more resistant.  When you feel a butyl sole, it actually feels slightly greasy (though it isn't like it will leave a residue on anything).  Double oak soles are very hardy, they just wear a bit faster when wet.  Once they dry out, they are back to their usual hardiness.  None of these are waterproof. [...]

post #18529 of 46863
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamAdam View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sqroot3 View Post

echoing the above sentiments--you should try some conditioner first, then some cream and wax polish if the scuffs persist. they likely won't. you'll likely have to get used to seeing similar scuffs that you incur (legs of a rolling chair, gas/brake/clutch pedals), and they are super easy to get rid of.

if you aren't satisfied after your attempts, you could even consider returning or exchanging the shoes yet again (granted you don't ruin them--which would anyway admittedly be difficult to do).

Thanks. The conditioner worked great and I'm wearing them this morning.

Where are the pictures?
post #18530 of 46863

Anybody have pictures of the dark brown shell Leeds?

post #18531 of 46863
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrick_b View Post

Anybody have pictures of the dark brown shell Leeds?

 

Where do you see them?  I haven't seen them made recently.

post #18532 of 46863
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Anyone have further commentary on the Butyl soles? Can you get them in single soles (e.g. could I recraft a pair of shoes with butyl without having to go with the double soles that are used on the boots)?

When I ordered my Daltons, I didn't realize there was even anything different--just thought they had colored the sole to match the rest of the boot...but then I realized that even when the sole scuffs on things, it doesn't reveal layers of normal looking leather and I looked it up and realized it was the butyl leather sole. It didn't say what that meant but over the past winter, I have noticed that they do seem to do very well with wet streets. I don't end up with wet socks after walking around in the rain.

Figured this might be mostly because of the double sole taking longer to soak through but I found this quote from AE customer service:
So that explains it. Are there any downsides to this? Seems like the best of both worlds--you get a true leather sole, but you get a large amount of the water resistance of a rubber sole. Its not like it is an ugly color--I think it would actually do great on the bottom of some black park avenues (assuming it is available in a single leather sole).

Quote:
Originally Posted by kentyman View Post

Though the AE website says others, I believe the Neumok has single butyl soles. See this very informative post from MoneyWellSpent for more information.

I think the Fifth Street have single Butyl leather soles too.
post #18533 of 46863

Here's the butyl sole on my custom Neumok.  I like it.

 

AppleMark

post #18534 of 46863

Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Anyone have further commentary on the Butyl soles? Can you get them in single soles (e.g. could I recraft a pair of shoes with butyl without having to go with the double soles that are used on the boots)?

When I ordered my Daltons, I didn't realize there was even anything different--just thought they had colored the sole to match the rest of the boot...but then I realized that even when the sole scuffs on things, it doesn't reveal layers of normal looking leather and I looked it up and realized it was the butyl leather sole. It didn't say what that meant but over the past winter, I have noticed that they do seem to do very well with wet streets. I don't end up with wet socks after walking around in the rain.

Figured this might be mostly because of the double sole taking longer to soak through but I found this quote from AE customer service:
So that explains it. Are there any downsides to this? Seems like the best of both worlds--you get a true leather sole, but you get a large amount of the water resistance of a rubber sole. Its not like it is an ugly color--I think it would actually do great on the bottom of some black park avenues (assuming it is available in a single leather sole).

I have them on the 744 LTD shell boots and love them. In fact they are so good I don't think that I'm going to bother putting Vibram lug half soles on them. On the other hand the 5th St. Boot also has them and they are totally different. Not sure if it was a bad batch or what but they are very soft and pick up stones and rocks badly. There are some large boulders in here:

1000

 

And use the serrated edge of a butter knife to clean them up, it leaves some large craters:

1000

These I will eventually get around to putting a thin dress half sole on to protect the butyl soles. But I suspect there was an issue with them to start with. Someone else said that theirs chipped easily which I would think means they were too hard, where as mine were too soft. Not sure how common this is.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrick_b View Post

Anybody have pictures of the dark brown shell Leeds?

I do Patrick, custom order with natural welt. 

 

With burgundy shell and black calf Leeds trifecta.

 

The natural welt makes them more casual which is what I was shooting for, but not too casual.

post #18535 of 46863

Does the butyl sole last significantly longer than the typical oak sole?

post #18536 of 46863
Thanks CI, I knew I saw them somewhere.
post #18537 of 46863
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Anyone have further commentary on the Butyl soles? Can you get them in single soles (e.g. could I recraft a pair of shoes with butyl without having to go with the double soles that are used on the boots)?

When I ordered my Daltons, I didn't realize there was even anything different--just thought they had colored the sole to match the rest of the boot...but then I realized that even when the sole scuffs on things, it doesn't reveal layers of normal looking leather and I looked it up and realized it was the butyl leather sole. It didn't say what that meant but over the past winter, I have noticed that they do seem to do very well with wet streets. I don't end up with wet socks after walking around in the rain.

Figured this might be mostly because of the double sole taking longer to soak through but I found this quote from AE customer service:
So that explains it. Are there any downsides to this? Seems like the best of both worlds--you get a true leather sole, but you get a large amount of the water resistance of a rubber sole. Its not like it is an ugly color--I think it would actually do great on the bottom of some black park avenues (assuming it is available in a single leather sole).

You can get the butyl in a single sole. i am having a pair of MacNeils and a PTB done with the sole.
post #18538 of 46863
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cold Iron View Post

I have them on the 744 LTD shell boots and love them. In fact they are so good I don't think that I'm going to bother putting Vibram lug half soles on them. On the other hand the 5th St. Boot also has them and they are totally different. Not sure if it was a bad batch or what but they are very soft and pick up stones and rocks badly. There are some large boulders in here:
1000


And use the serrated edge of a butter knife to clean them up, it leaves some large craters:
1000

These I will eventually get around to putting a thin dress half sole on to protect the butyl soles. But I suspect there was an issue with them to start with. Someone else said that theirs chipped easily which I would think means they were too hard, where as mine were too soft. Not sure how common this is.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I do Patrick, custom order with natural welt. 



With burgundy shell and black calf Leeds trifecta.



The natural welt makes them more casual which is what I was shooting for, but not too casual.

Well said, Cold Iron. I love the butyl sole on my 744s, because they are just the perfect amount of "grippiness". Plain leather soles can get slippery on smooth surfaces like marble, particularly when the surface is wet. I also think butyl is a little more water resistant, although they still have stitching, so I'd stop well short of calling them waterproof.

I would not hesitate to get them on a less rugged shoe, as well. I might even choose them over the combination/v-tread for a dress shoe, depending on how they looked.
post #18539 of 46863
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajmanouk View Post

Anyone know a place in downtown Toronto I can pick up some kiwi tan polish to shine my walnut strands? Tried Novelty Shoe but to no avail =(

 

I just tried the tan polish for the first time on a pair of walnut Park Avenues and I wasn't impressed. It's yellow wax polish, and when the wax catches on the stitching it leaves little bits of yellow residue that contrast horribly against the darker thread. I've never used the mid-tan, but I would imagine that it would be closer in hue to walnut than the tan polish is.

post #18540 of 46863
Somebody please guide me on AE cordovan caring. I never had this problem with Alden shell cordovan, but with all AE shells, there is crazy amount of factory polish on shoes.
It blocks nature shine of cordovan. I used saphir renovatuer over 10 times on one of brown shell, I still get brown polish off shoes.
I do use mac method to care my shoes, but I can't get shine like alden cordovan on AE.
I remember, someone was going to use renomat on shell to remove polish off the shoes.
Can anyone comment on that method?

Thanks in advance!
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