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Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread - Page 902

post #13516 of 50911
Quote:
Originally Posted by clarksdb View Post

First time wearing Del Ray today:

nod[1].gif I love those... Looking good
post #13517 of 50911
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Haines View Post

Oh I believe it's a defect but after few wears at least for me it goes away. My problem is recently its been happening allot to me. This year four pairs had that problem.

If it goes away after a few wears I'm not sure it's a defect; rather, some would call that the break-in process. My lumps did not go away - but I'm glad yours did.
post #13518 of 50911
Quote:
Originally Posted by sevenfoldtieguy View Post

If it goes away after a few wears I'm not sure it's a defect; rather, some would call that the break-in process. My lumps did not go away - but I'm glad yours did.

Maybe a break in process but just seems that lately the cork beds are not as uniformed as use to be
post #13519 of 50911

I've had one pair of shoes where I felt this issue - a pair of 5th street boots about a year ago.  I returned them rather than trying to break them in - I hope yours work out.  

post #13520 of 50911

I've had one pair also that had large lumps in the foot bed. It was the Vinci of the seven collection during the 2 for $200 sale. I returned them and unfortunately there were no more left in my size and it was a discontinued model. In hindsight I should have kept them and sent them in to be resoled and a new foot bed done. That would have brought the cost up to $200 but that shoe was worth all of that, and more. Not sure why I just thought of that and didn't at the time...

post #13521 of 50911
Quote:
Originally Posted by bucksfan View Post

They could be corrected grain - in that case they will feel plasticky no matter what you do. They will hold up very well to almost anything, but look and feel plasticky. I imagine that's why AE went away from it. A pic might help.

I don't think the McAllister was ever offered in corrected grain, was it?

post #13522 of 50911
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cold Iron View Post

 

Thanks, and good to know. For belts I have always used AE Leather Lotion. Not too long ago I switched to Bickmore Bicks 4 which is identical, cheaper and easy to find at any tack shop or farm and fleet. It looks and behaves the same as AE leather lotion, it doesn't leave a residue and doesn't darken leather. I use it on my AE Wilbert's so as to not darken the contrast stitching, Filson bridle leather, and belts.

 

 

Like bucksfan said at first just wear them, and enjoy. After they need cleaning and conditioning for CXL I use hot water and saddle soap, and only fiebings glycerine saddle soap which is 100% glycerine. With CXL and chrome tanned leather I use a stiff nylon scrub brush, it will restore the short nap that exist on the surface of the CXL. Wait until they are completely dry and then treat with Reno which will restore the luster as good or even better than when new. Waterproofing will take that luster away somewhat, if you want to wear them as a dress boot you are done. That is how I do it and it has worked well for me. There are a lot of different ways of doing it but some IMO over do the use of too many products.

 

Glad to see Jay Clay mentioned using saddle soap for cleaning Daltons to remove old build up. Saddle soap seems to be a forbidden product on SF. Not all saddle soaps are created equal and 100% glycerine is pretty safe to say the least. Just make sure to use a sponge and not a brush on calf and finer leathers. I have not had to use saddle soap on my finer dress shoes but have used it on some more casual shoes, and all my hiking and hunting boots. And saddle soap is recommended by AE for cleaning\conditioning dublin leather like the McTavish and Krause.

 

I agree here on the use of saddle soap.  It does seem to carry a misconception on SF that it will somehow kill your shoes (ignoring the fact that it has been in use for countless years to care for leather).  Granted, calfskin is more delicate than full grain cowhide saddles which is what saddle soap was developed for, but the more delicate nature of calfskin doesn't mean you can't use saddle soap.  I have used it to strip off years of built up polish (especially when AE's cleaner/conditioner doesn't quite get all of it).  After use, the leather is silky smooth and very soft.  I haven't had any bad results yet.  Justin Fitzpatrick on his Shoe Snob blog indicates that he uses it for this purpose as well: http://www.theshoesnobblog.com/p/polish-your-shoes-properly.html and considering that he runs a shoe shine stand for Gieves and Hawkes shining $1000.00 + shoes, I would take his word that it is plenty safe. 

post #13523 of 50911
Quote:
Originally Posted by catside View Post

Ordered Long Branches from Jay. Excellent value since I lucked out with firsts in tan. If you were looking for Long Branches, this is the time and Jay was really a pleasure to talk to.

 

Long Branch Firsts for $195.00?  I thought I got a good deal on my Seconds for that price on Black Friday. baldy[1].gif

post #13524 of 50911
Quote:
Originally Posted by msulinski View Post

I don't think the McAllister was ever offered in corrected grain, was it?

Yep - AE calls it "polished cobbler."  An example:

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Allen-Edmonds-McAllister-6275-Burgandy-Polished-Cobbler-Wingtip-8-D-1042-/150947381243?pt=US_Men_s_Shoes&hash=item23252a3ffb&ssPageName=RSS:B:SHOP:US:101

 

I had a pair of black MacNeils for a while in corrected grain.  It's decent for corrected grain, but it's not full grain leather...

post #13525 of 50911
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willin View Post

I recently purchased the new Bourbon Calf strands in the 5 last with an E width. I have Strands in a EE width that fit like a glove but unfortunately the Bourbon Calf's aren't yet available in that size. EEE felt too wide on my feet at the store.
Long story short the E width I received seems a bit too small for my (hobbit-like) feet. Does anyone here have experience with getting their shoes professionally stretched at a cobbler? Is it effective or not worth trying? I am a bit concerned these are too small all around so I may resell them anyhow but I'm curious about stretching.
Thanks!

I tried the Bourbon Calf Strands on again last night and they actually fit how I like them. Kind of tight like a soccer cleat but that's what I prefer. Oddly when I tried them on yesterday morning they felt tighter but I suppose my feet may have been swollen or something. I'll give them a few more tries around the house before I scar them on the sidewalk.
post #13526 of 50911
Quote:
Originally Posted by bucksfan View Post

They could be corrected grain - in that case they will feel plasticky no matter what you do. They will hold up very well to almost anything, but look and feel plasticky. I imagine that's why AE went away from it. A pic might help.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bucksfan View Post

Yep - AE calls it "polished cobbler."  An example:

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Allen-Edmonds-McAllister-6275-Burgandy-Polished-Cobbler-Wingtip-8-D-1042-/150947381243?pt=US_Men_s_Shoes&hash=item23252a3ffb&ssPageName=RSS:B:SHOP:US:101

 

I had a pair of black MacNeils for a while in corrected grain.  It's decent for corrected grain, but it's not full grain leather...

 

Did you find that corrected grain leather has an unfair reputation in terms of durability then?    

Also, a side question that the pictures of the shoes in that ebay posting reminded me of...  When you look at the pictures of the soles, you see where the stitching on the bottom of the shoes has been worn down.  Any experience with this leading to sole separation from the welt before the soles are actually worn out?  They are supposed to be "lock-stitched", so my understanding is that they should still be very durable even after the concrete has worn down the stitching on the bottom of the shoes.  Just curious if you or anyone else has had any experience otherwise.  Some of my shoes have worn through some small segments of the stitching (like at the toe, or at the widest point of the sole around the ball of the foot), but not enough to lead to sole separation.  The shoes in the ebay pictures have had a major percentage worn through.

post #13527 of 50911
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

 

Did you find that corrected grain leather has an unfair reputation in terms of durability then?    

Also, a side question that the pictures of the shoes in that ebay posting reminded me of...  When you look at the pictures of the soles, you see where the stitching on the bottom of the shoes has been worn down.  Any experience with this leading to sole separation from the welt before the soles are actually worn out?  They are supposed to be "lock-stitched", so my understanding is that they should still be very durable even after the concrete has worn down the stitching on the bottom of the shoes.  Just curious if you or anyone else has had any experience otherwise.  Some of my shoes have worn through some small segments of the stitching (like at the toe, or at the widest point of the sole around the ball of the foot), but not enough to lead to sole separation.  The shoes in the ebay pictures have had a major percentage worn through.

 

 

Quality corrected grain shoes can be very durable.  They will have the micro-creases you see in that auction, but if rotated like any other quality shoe will last extremely well.  I just do not find that sort of creasing attractive.  My business partner has a few pair that are going on 30 years old, and they will last him for the remainder of his career, I am confident.  One pair, in particular, is a pair of AE saddle shoes that he wears any time it rains or snows, sometimes 3-4 days in a row. The only care he gives them is the periodic airport shoe shine.  

 

I have seen shoes where the sole stitching is worn as you see in that auction, and much worse.  As you correctly point out, it should be "lock" stitched, so the sole will not come away from the welt due to this sort of wear.  

post #13528 of 50911
Quote:
Originally Posted by bucksfan View Post

 

 

Quality corrected grain shoes can be very durable.  They will have the micro-creases you see in that auction, but if rotated like any other quality shoe will last extremely well.  I just do not find that sort of creasing attractive.  My business partner has a few pair that are going on 30 years old, and they will last him for the remainder of his career, I am confident.  One pair, in particular, is a pair of AE saddle shoes that he wears any time it rains or snows, sometimes 3-4 days in a row. The only care he gives them is the periodic airport shoe shine.  

 

I have seen shoes where the sole stitching is worn as you see in that auction, and much worse.  As you correctly point out, it should be "lock" stitched, so the sole will not come away from the welt due to this sort of wear.  

 

The creasing is the primary reason that they are a turn-off for me as well.  I hadn't given much thought to the resiliency they would have in rain though... food for thought!

post #13529 of 50911
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willin View Post

I tried the Bourbon Calf Strands on again last night and they actually fit how I like them. Kind of tight like a soccer cleat but that's what I prefer. Oddly when I tried them on yesterday morning they felt tighter but I suppose my feet may have been swollen or something. I'll give them a few more tries around the house before I scar them on the sidewalk.

I found my Strands to be the tightest shoes I own. I'm a 12B in most AE shoes, 11.5C in the park ave (although i also fit in the 12B). Tight might not be the right word (for me at least), though. There is no pain, no pressure, etc. It's the kind of fit that you put them on and are like "i wonder if my foot will fall asleep" - it never does. It's pretty much the way I imagine all shoes should fit. Kind of like tightening a stretch cotton surcingle belt one extra hole - if that makes any sense!

-J
post #13530 of 50911
Picked these off the 'bay from the guy that was selling his Moras that I posted earlier.

Niles, 8 last, model number 2538 in Brown calf. Hide (Click to show)
Straight out from the box






Next to my walnut Shell Strands]/b]


After a coat of Saphir Renovateur

After a coat of Saphir Dark Brown Cream Polish

After two coats of Saphir Neutral wax on the captoe (I think my AE Brown Wax dried out]

Maiden voyage

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