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Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread - reviews, pictures, sizing, etc... - Page 4293  

post #64381 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by peppercorn78 View Post

If you have a wide ball and skinny arches and heels, you're gonna get bowing in the 5 last, plain and simple. Question is if that bothers you enough to offset the comfort.

And on SF, people will always feel free to offer unsolicited criticism. smile.gif

I'm very satisfied with the fit given that I'm a 3E. smile.gif
post #64382 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by peppercorn78 View Post

Dainite for NYC salt and slush = don't do it.

I wear my Long Branch boots quite often outside of snowy conditions. Of course, I have the previous version with the full hearty Vibram lugs. smile.gif

Pepper, can you opine on dainite soles generally? I'm failing to see what advantage they would offer over the V Thread.
post #64383 of 70737

Dainite has less grip initially, especially on slippery, wet, or icy ground. However, once you scuff up the Dainite a bit, it tends to work decently well.

 

V-tread has more initial grip but wears down slightly faster than Dainite, and still has an exposed section of leather between the v-tread rubber and the heel, which might lead to faster internal wear due to the moisture penetration.

 

I would not trek through the snow or ice in either, but if you're just walking from your car to the office, or from your home to the subway, you will likely be fine in Dainite. Just walk carefully.

post #64384 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by peppercorn78 View Post

If you have a wide ball and skinny arches and heels, you're gonna get bowing in the 5 last, plain and simple. Question is if that bothers you enough to offset the comfort.

And on SF, people will always feel free to offer unsolicited criticism. smile.gif

I think the amount of bowing is acceptable. I just feel that the vgap is too wide for a balmoral. If laced properly, meaning closed or at least close enough, I don't think these would feel comfortable at all. There would just be too much pressure on the instep.

I have a very high instep and I've basically given up on a 65 lasted balmoral.

Just sharing my thoughts as someone who tried to make the 65 work but eventually decided to move on to other makers with lasts with higher insteps.
post #64385 of 70737
I imagine this is the 'Brooks Oxblood Dundee' they currently have at the Shoebank for $169.

http://www.brooksbrothers.com/Plain-Toe-Chukka-Boots/MH00507,default,pd.html?dwvar_MH00507_Color=DKRD&contentpos=17&cgid=0522
post #64386 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by watchidiot View Post


I think the amount of bowing is acceptable. I just feel that the vgap is too wide for a balmoral. If laced properly, meaning closed or at least close enough, I don't think these would feel comfortable at all. There would just be too much pressure on the instep.

I have a very high instep and I've basically given up on a 65 lasted balmoral.

Just sharing my thoughts as someone who tried to make the 65 work but eventually decided to move on to other makers with lasts with higher insteps.

 

Out of curiosity, which makers do you buy your shoes from that accommodate high insteps? 

post #64387 of 70737

Ok so I am probably going to order a briefcase during this sale.  Outlets have no seconds for the ones I want, but they can obtain firsts at the current prices listed on the AE website.

 

I live in a state with no AE outlets (but one AE retail store).  When I've ordered shoes from them in the past (seconds from the outlet), there has been no tax.  If I order a "first" quality briefcase from the outlet, would that be taxed or no?  It's a fairly significant (~$25) difference.

post #64388 of 70737
You shouldn't have to pay the tax ordering from the outlet or store I would think, only if you picked it up from the retail store in person.
post #64389 of 70737
For AE the 222 and 333 work way better for me in terms of high arch issues.

I can't generalize to other makers...but boots always seem to work no matter what.
post #64390 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by peppercorn78 View Post


If you have a wide ball and skinny arches and heels, you're gonna get bowing in the 5 last, plain and simple. Question is if that bothers you enough to offset the comfort.

And on SF, people will always feel free to offer unsolicited criticism. smile.gif


This is me. My right shoe typically gets a little bowing, but I can not wear a C width in the 65. The 333 last, on the other hand, seems to do just fine. Problem is, I love the look of the 65, and since I don't get heel slippage, I'm gonna wear them. However, I don't have a significantly high instep to deal with either. 


Edited by redmusic1 - 9/27/15 at 1:06pm
post #64391 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by BKBridge View Post
 

Question for my NYC folks. The last glaring weakness in my shoe rotation is a boot to get me through the winter. I know the Long Branch is the superior option for snow, but do you think I can get away with a Dalton w/ Dainite for my 5 min walk to and from the subway? I just feel like I'm never going to wear the Long Branch outside of winter whereas my current cheap pair of wingtip boots gets a lot of wear even now.

I find that Dainite and similar soles are fine for the first part of the winter, but once the snow really starts to fall (which wasn't until January this past winter), the snow and slush is a little too deep for Dainite, and you risk getting salt stains on your uppers.  On those days, I either wear winter boots and carry my dress shoes to work, or else I wear older pairs of Johnston & Murphy "Hardings" which I bought on Amazon before I started to buy higher-quality shoes.

post #64392 of 70737

I think that a lot of the made-for-Brooks Brothers shoes are really sharp.  Unfortunately, they only go up to size 13, which leaves guys like me out of luck.  Not only does Brooks Brothers not carry anything in a 15, but the only pair of 14s they carry are lizard-skin sneakers that cost $1200.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by bellyhungry View Post

I imagine this is the 'Brooks Oxblood Dundee' they currently have at the Shoebank for $169.

http://www.brooksbrothers.com/Plain-Toe-Chukka-Boots/MH00507,default,pd.html?dwvar_MH00507_Color=DKRD&contentpos=17&cgid=0522
post #64393 of 70737

Open question for you guys:

 

I'm taking a couple of vacation trips to the Pacific Northwest this fall, and I have been in the market for a pair of shoes versatile enough to be the only pair of proper shoes I pack on the trip.  I won't need to dress formally, but I plan on staying in decent hotels and treating myself to a couple of meals at fancy restaurants.  After looking at a few different options, I narrowed things down to thick-soled longwings like Allen Edmonds's MacNeil, and to a pebble grain chukka.  Once Allen Edmonds introduced the MacNeil 2.0, they reduced the 1.0s to $197, so I bought a pair in brown.  They look great, but I think they might be a little dressy to wear walking around Portland and Denver for a weekend in jeans and a waxed cotton jacket.  $197 is a great price for them, though, especially compared to $385 for Dundee firsts (the only Dundees available at the time).

 

But, during the current sale, pebble grain Dundee seconds are $219, at which price they are appealing enough for me to consider returning the MacNeils and buying them instead.

 

Which do you think would be better-suited for these purposes?  I obviously wouldn't wear my Dundees in seriously bad weather, but I think that, with their Dainite sole and pebble grain, they may be better-suited for the sort of drizzle I am likely to encounter in the northwest in the fall.

 

For what its worth, this is the rest of my shoe collection:

 

Brown Madison Avenues

Merlot Chester shortwings

Black cap-toe oxfords

Black Cliftons

Brown McGraw penny loafers

Bitter Chocolate Fifth Avenues

Chili Daltons

 

Others shoes:

brown suede Clark's desert boots

black and brown beaten-up Johnston & Murphy bluchers (mainly for bad weather, etc).

 

Any recommendations would be much appreciated!

post #64394 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by BespokeBrooklyn View Post

I find that Dainite and similar soles are fine for the first part of the winter, but once the snow really starts to fall (which wasn't until January this past winter), the snow and slush is a little too deep for Dainite, and you risk getting salt stains on your uppers.  On those days, I either wear winter boots and carry my dress shoes to work, or else I wear older pairs of Johnston & Murphy "Hardings" which I bought on Amazon before I started to buy higher-quality shoes.

Very good points. Just to add my personal opinion, I don't mess around and try to look sharp walking down the street in ice and slush when it's freezing and snowing. What worked really well for for the really crappy months during the last winter was a pair of 6 inch Chippawa boots that I got from Amazon for $125. I would cover them with Obenauf LP every 2-3 weeks, wear thick wool socks, and my feet were always warm and dry. Take care of your feet and health!
post #64395 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by Levi1 View Post


I'm considering them for that reason but the scuffs and dark patches seem like theymay be a bridge too far to cross. My issue is thati don't have experience with cordovan so don't know what's possible. Have you had a GOOD look at the pics?

I thought the scratches may come out with a deer bone.  If you're talking about the dark spots, that's just patina/depth.  Shell will look like that after a few years. To me, it's like looking into the Milky Way galaxy :inlove: kinda translucent/mesmerizing.

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