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Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread - reviews, pictures, sizing, etc... - Page 2947  

post #44191 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by NWTeal View Post
 

I believe it's similar, if not the same, as "Kaizen" which is what I learned it as.

Kaizen is the core principal philosophy of continuous improvement, whereas Lean is a more formalized management approach which (if you are being an MBA nerd) can be analyzed and quantified via Six Sigma (so some say :D) through statistical analysis. When done right, these things really can be helpful (I am a huge believer in analysis tools and modeling) but, be warned, this stuff is often used in the world of McKinsey buzzword bullshit. Really, it's mostly common sense stuff with some models, tools and proven techniques.

 

Over simplified, one would employ concepts of Kaizen to ensure continual improvement all aspects of performance by evaluating problems and solving them, one would use Lean practices to reduce all unnecessary waste (time, money, manpower, materials) from specific processes (e.g. manufacturing) and one would use well defined analysis tools to quantify performance and provide feedback as to where attention should be focused.

post #44192 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by BolognaFingers View Post
 

So its what we social scientist academics call parsimony.

Close, throw in continuous improvement and think of it as systemically applied with the intent of not just saving money or resources, but also improving the product or service.

 

On a side note, I will find a way to work the word "parsimony" into a sentence sometime this week.

post #44193 of 70737
Thanks for the background info, all!
post #44194 of 70737
Speaking of seconds, I'm breaking my shoe-buying moratorium to buy some Wilberts for 179 to use as neighborhood/playground beaters. No need for perfection in this instance, considering the hell I'll put them through.
post #44195 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterFu View Post
 

Close, throw in continuous improvement and think of it as systemically applied with the intent of not just saving money or resources, but also improving the product or service.

 

On a side note, I will find a way to work the word "parsimony" into a sentence sometime this week.

 

Even just 'simony' would get you massive lexical props.

post #44196 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by BolognaFingers View Post
 

So its what we social scientist academics call parsimony.

 

I haven't heard that word since the days when I too aspired to become a social-science academic.

post #44197 of 70737
Re:

Originally Posted by BCer

I am not by any means a 'big-time' AE shoe buyer, but reasonable, with my 12 or so pairs. But I watch this, and the MTO threads very closely out of deep curiosity (and envy). What I am absolutely shocked and amazed at, is the huge numbers of seconds, such that AE has been forced to create retail outlets and regular sales to liquidate, AND the incredible number of rejected MTO's.

In my career, I work with retailers and manufacturers, and think I know a little about the manufacturing and QC process. I have heard quite a lot of the Japanese manufacturing 'teams' that they employ, with huge accountability.

With the large numbers of less-than-perfect quality product that AE produces, and then even allows to get through their QC, one wonders who's steering the ship? Is there no responsibility on the assembly lines? Are there no lot numbers, traceable back to certain shifts or even specific employees? It appears that their shoemakers may just be assigned to a shoe assembly line depending on who showed up for shift first!? Do they make a new shoe every day, or do they gain experience in a certain shoe type, becoming experts? Seems not.

And for MTO's, which are by definition, something unique, special, and being created to be cherished by that customer - these should be created by their top performers. By some of the posts here, it seems the last guys to show up for shift that day get assigned to the dreaded MTO line - no special experience necessary. So it seems.

And have their QC inspectors ever seen a pair of shoes before? How did the shoes above make it into a box? Do they treat the QC position as a low-end entry level job? In my mind it would be a perfect position for maybe a semi-retired or injured shoemaker who doesn't have the dexterity to work the machines anymore (arthritis, finger/hand injuries, etc), but who intimately knows the construction of a fine pair of shoes. Doesn't seem that's the case. More like "yep, it's got a sole, upper, tongue, and someone put some laces in them - ready to go!"

With the unbelievable quantity of seconds they flush through regularly, I wonder how much their everyday (firsts) retails are affected? If they improved their accountability on the manufacturing lines, improved their quality to almost eliminate seconds, could the everyday pricing be much lower? Instead of $300 for firsts, and 2/$250 seconds, would/could the everyday price of Allen Edmonds shoes be $225 (or whatever).

Sorry for my rant, take it for what it's worth and carry on...I just felt like venting from afar.

__


I'm sorry, but this is certainly not a rant.

Of the last five or more shoes I've purchased, the majority have had significant defects. All of them have been first quality shoes that should never have passed inspection and never would've been expected to have these defects years gone by.

I'm 61 years old now and I've been purchasing Allen Edmonds shoes since I was 16 years old and have over 20 pairs of their shoes.

All of the older first quality shoes are still in a sling condition always were.

The newer first quality shoes I've purchased have been appallingly deficient in many ways and I've had to return the majority of them.

This is a definite trend that I've been watching.

It seems that this blog prefers to pretend that there is no problem in the manufacturing process and the quality control at Allen Edmonds. Unfortunately, I don't know why this is the case but it is the case!

You should not be functioning as boosters. Of course it's an appreciation thread and having size 15 shoes, I appreciate the fact that I've been able to purchase such fine shoes that would otherwise be unavailable to me.

Nevertheless, the truth is the truth and Allen Edmonds has declined considerably in recent years. They should make note of this and we should acknowledge the truth. That, to me, will be most appreciative!.

S
post #44198 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by srolaser View Post
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Re:

Originally Posted by BCer

I am not by any means a 'big-time' AE shoe buyer, but reasonable, with my 12 or so pairs. But I watch this, and the MTO threads very closely out of deep curiosity (and envy). What I am absolutely shocked and amazed at, is the huge numbers of seconds, such that AE has been forced to create retail outlets and regular sales to liquidate, AND the incredible number of rejected MTO's.

In my career, I work with retailers and manufacturers, and think I know a little about the manufacturing and QC process. I have heard quite a lot of the Japanese manufacturing 'teams' that they employ, with huge accountability.

With the large numbers of less-than-perfect quality product that AE produces, and then even allows to get through their QC, one wonders who's steering the ship? Is there no responsibility on the assembly lines? Are there no lot numbers, traceable back to certain shifts or even specific employees? It appears that their shoemakers may just be assigned to a shoe assembly line depending on who showed up for shift first!? Do they make a new shoe every day, or do they gain experience in a certain shoe type, becoming experts? Seems not.

And for MTO's, which are by definition, something unique, special, and being created to be cherished by that customer - these should be created by their top performers. By some of the posts here, it seems the last guys to show up for shift that day get assigned to the dreaded MTO line - no special experience necessary. So it seems.

And have their QC inspectors ever seen a pair of shoes before? How did the shoes above make it into a box? Do they treat the QC position as a low-end entry level job? In my mind it would be a perfect position for maybe a semi-retired or injured shoemaker who doesn't have the dexterity to work the machines anymore (arthritis, finger/hand injuries, etc), but who intimately knows the construction of a fine pair of shoes. Doesn't seem that's the case. More like "yep, it's got a sole, upper, tongue, and someone put some laces in them - ready to go!"

With the unbelievable quantity of seconds they flush through regularly, I wonder how much their everyday (firsts) retails are affected? If they improved their accountability on the manufacturing lines, improved their quality to almost eliminate seconds, could the everyday pricing be much lower? Instead of $300 for firsts, and 2/$250 seconds, would/could the everyday price of Allen Edmonds shoes be $225 (or whatever).

Sorry for my rant, take it for what it's worth and carry on...I just felt like venting from afar.

__


I'm sorry, but this is certainly not a rant.

Of the last five or more shoes I've purchased, the majority have had significant defects. All of them have been first quality shoes that should never have passed inspection and never would've been expected to have these defects years gone by.

I'm 61 years old now and I've been purchasing Allen Edmonds shoes since I was 16 years old and have over 20 pairs of their shoes.

All of the older first quality shoes are still in a sling condition always were.

The newer first quality shoes I've purchased have been appallingly deficient in many ways and I've had to return the majority of them.

This is a definite trend that I've been watching.

It seems that this blog prefers to pretend that there is no problem in the manufacturing process and the quality control at Allen Edmonds. Unfortunately, I don't know why this is the case but it is the case!

You should not be functioning as boosters. Of course it's an appreciation thread and having size 15 shoes, I appreciate the fact that I've been able to purchase such fine shoes that would otherwise be unavailable to me.


Nevertheless, the truth is the truth and Allen Edmonds has declined considerably in recent years. They should make note of this and we should acknowledge the truth. That, to me, will be most appreciative!.

S

1. Not a blog; this is an online discussion forum / bulletin board

 

2. Nobody is functioning as a booster. Not everyone may have had the same experience as yourself or, perhaps, your long-term experience gives you a better vantage point from which to observe the issues with AE quality (from my 10 years of AE shoes, AE quality has always been middling). You are welcome to post your issues and experiences.

 

3. Posting examples for discussion would be more interesting and helpful (and more likely to get AE's attention).

post #44199 of 70737

Re. the seconds point. AE has such great customer service that if a customer takes the shoes home and for whatever reason he doesn't like them. Creases them up a little.  AE will take them back. No questions asked.  Instant seconds!

post #44200 of 70737
I sent a pair of RL Sandersons back for new heels and I just got a call from AE saying that they couldn't install the new heels and to come pick them up Has this happened to anyone else? Is it because they are RL shoes or maybe there was too much wear?
post #44201 of 70737
AE didn't advise you as to why they could not recraft said shoes?
post #44202 of 70737
Just got a call saying they couldn't. She didn't specify why. I'll ask when I pick up my shoes. I'm hoping it's the wear on the heel and not because they are RL by AE.
post #44203 of 70737

Hi all,

 

Longtime lurker, first time poster. Just a small collection of AE shoes. Only one pair of firsts - Brown McAllisters from the recent sale. A few pairs of seconds, including some 6th Aves in Chestnut (akin to the Sanfords it seems) from NR, along with Neumok in grey (also from the Rack), wondering if they're an MTO or what, since the Neumok doesn't come in grey to my knowledge.

 

Anyway, was wondering what you all think of the pair of Walnut Strands I just snagged on eBay. They seem to be seconds (I see a faint seconds sole mark in one of the photos), and there appears to be a no warranty stamp (but I can't tell based on the photos - the seller says is a "no returns" mark). Anyway, based on the soles I'd guess they've been worn no more than once or twice. A few minor blemishes on the medallion area / toebox (I see a faint crease), but I think for $149 I got a decent deal.

 

What do you guys think?

 

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Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

 

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

 

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

 

Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2


Edited by JSO1 - 5/12/14 at 11:06pm
post #44204 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterFu View Post
 
 
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by NWTeal View Post
 

I believe it's similar, if not the same, as "Kaizen" which is what I learned it as.

Kaizen is the core principal philosophy of continuous improvement, whereas Lean is a more formalized management approach which (if you are being an MBA nerd) can be analyzed and quantified via Six Sigma (so some say :D) through statistical analysis. When done right, these things really can be helpful (I am a huge believer in analysis tools and modeling) but,

be warned, this stuff is often used in the world of McKinsey buzzword bullshit.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Really, it's mostly common sense stuff with some models, tools and proven techniques.

 

Over simplified, one would employ concepts of Kaizen to ensure continual improvement all aspects of performance by evaluating problems and solving them, one would use Lean practices to reduce all unnecessary waste (time, money, manpower, materials) from specific processes (e.g. manufacturing) and one would use well defined analysis tools to quantify performance and provide feedback as to where attention should be focused.

 

 

No need to call out someone's employer/industry :) Never know who is lurking on the board

post #44205 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by wonsmithr8 View Post

Wearing MTO dark chocolate MacNeil 5s today:



Didn't know what you guys meant by your shoes squeaking and now I know haha. Didn't hear it while I was walking outside but holy squeaking so much in the office. I'll be glued to my chair today haha

Your sole and contrasting strings I always like a lot. Compliments.

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