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Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread - reviews, pictures, sizing, etc... - Page 1972  

post #29566 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by tifosi View Post


I'm fairly certain that AE is out of Walnut and currently running out or out of cappuccino.

 

Right- but there might be a chance they might acquire more shells? Why are lighter shades of shell considered more rare- is it because lighter shades require better quality shells, and thus are produced less by Horween?

post #29567 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by spitshine123 View Post

Right- but there might be a chance they might acquire more shells? Why are lighter shades of shell considered more rare- is it because lighter shades require better quality shells, and thus are produced less by Horween?
When I ordered my MTO they said thay had no plans to restock any light shell in the near future.
You are correct. Higher quality shells are required.
post #29568 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by spitshine123 View Post
 

 

Right- but there might be a chance they might acquire more shells? Why are lighter shades of shell considered more rare- is it because lighter shades require better quality shells, and thus are produced less by Horween?

 

Nope. I have been told multiple times that black, burgundy and dark brown will be the only stocked colors

post #29569 of 70737
One of the reasons I really appreciate Allison. When I ordered my Daltons I originally wanted them in cappuccino but she advised me that if I wanted anything in Walnut I had to order it asap. Glad I did.
post #29570 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by bespoken pa View Post

One of the reasons I really appreciate Allison. When I ordered my Daltons I originally wanted them in cappuccino but she advised me that if I wanted anything in Walnut I had to order it asap. Glad I did.

 

Good call! I love my walnut Daltons and I am sure you do as well

post #29571 of 70737
Lighter shells cannot have imperfections like the darker dyed shells. The light dye of say walnut will not cover the blemishes like black or burgundy, thus only the highest quality shell can be used.
post #29572 of 70737
Is it appropriate to ask AE for updates on a MTO...err...order? Or will I be a PITA? I am about halfway through their lead time.
post #29573 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by tifosi View Post

Is it appropriate to ask AE for updates on a MTO...err...order? Or will I be a PITA? I am about halfway through their lead time.

I called Allison about another MTO and asked about my current order, she gave me a quick update.
post #29574 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwhitelaw View Post
 

 

my version of break in method is lace up and hit the pavements. that being said, my toe end of the sole does tend to wear aggressively. *maybe* the 'mac method' of wearing for a couple hours on a carpeted surface would help break the sole in and minimize that wear. my amount of care on the matter is nil.

 
concerning the aggressive brushing etc. I cannot achieve a shine that has been displayed by Mac, and others throughout the alden thread. I employ no paste, just some reno from time to time..
 
I'd honestly love to send a pair of well worn shoes to a forum member to see what can be accomplished. either that, or I'll wait for alden or B. Nelson to do a resole and just refinish the uppers then.
 
just my .o2

 

Breaking the shoes in on indoor surfaces is certainly going to decrease the heavy toe wear that happens initially.  I think if you can be patient, it's worth it.  If Mac gets credit for that idea, so be it.  I was wearing my shoes around the house to break them in before I ever heard of Macarthur, for what it's worth.

 

I actually have a pair that I was impatient with, regarding the indoor break-in period.  They are seconds, and the right shoe had been tried on several times in the store, as evidenced by the amount of creasing, while the left shoe was pristine.  I didn't wear them indoors for any significant time to break them in, and now the toe on the right shoe has several millimeters more sole depth than the left one.  The right shoe still has stitching present at the toe, while the toe of the left shoe has worn through the stitching.

post #29575 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by masernaut View Post
 

The only part about the "Mac Method" I believe in is the constant brushing. Brushing shell for long periods of time DOES bring out a shine. However, I have not had any luck using the method to remove factory finishing or old polish and gunk from the leather.

 

Mayhaps the method is only something that works on Aldens?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by New Shoes1 View Post
 

 

 I used the Mac Method to remove the factory polish from my shell patriots.  It took a long time (at least a month or more) before the cloth came back clear, but it did eventually work.  That said, I am a huge believer in using  Saphir's cordovan creme on shell occasionally to nourish the shell and bring out a nice shine.

 

 

Brushing is a proven method, for any type of leather, and will help prevent the leather from cracking after many years of wear.  Brushing leather is an age old method that is far older than Mcarthur.  It's part of the care for saddles and other leather equipment as well.  Part of what contributes to leather cracking in shoes (or any other leather articles) that are many years old (and are kept conditioned) is the microscopic accumulation of dust and grit in the creases.  This accumulation begins to act as an abrasive, destroying the leather by acting like sandpaper every time it flexes.  Brushing your shoes before wear to remove any accumulated dust before wearing them, and brushing them when you take them off to remove accumulated dust and dirt will keep you ahead of the game and help prevent the grit from settling into the creases.  Also, wiping the shoes with a damp cloth to remove any potential grit before you apply conditioner/polish will keep you from rubbing the grit into the leather fibers during shoe care.  Don't assume that just because the shoes look like they are dust/dirt free that they actually are.  Plenty of this abrasion happens at the microscopic level.  Turning microscopic surface grit into a nice paste to be rubbed into the fiber mat using your conditioner/polish isn't exactly good shoe care.

 

I don't think Mac started his "method" based on any scientific reasons.  Rather, he has figured out a way to get his shell shoes to shine at their best.  Essentially, less is more when it comes to getting a nice clean shine on shell.  I have no problem with that, or giving him credit for that.  However, I fully agree that some conditioner of some sort needs to be applied every now and then, regardless of what it does to the beloved shine.  No leather can survive to it's fullest potential without ever replacing lost oils, and shell is no exception.  Shell is very saturated from the factory with oils, and it certainly needs less care than calf to replace it, but that is finite.  I think that those who follow Mac's "Method" too literally will end up destroying their shoes over the long term (the definition of long term varies from person to person, and amount of wear).  Don't forget that Macarthur apparently has so many pairs of shoes that he only has to wear each pair a handful of times per year (given equal rotation).  At the rate of wear that he has, it makes perfect sense why he can have pairs that are 30 years old and still look relatively new with little care.  In other words, a pair of his shoes that are 30 years old, may have less wear on them than the average SF member's shoes after one year!  Don't miss that when you are deciding to blindly follow his care method!  I think there should be a disclaimer regarding this for any newbies that come along seeking to make their shell shoes last as long as possible, while still looking good as well.  You may lose some of your nice shine when you apply conditioning agents, but the shine will return, and the leather will have received some nourishment. 

 

With regard to the comment above about the "Method" only working on Alden... that's not the first time I've seen that possibility mentioned, but I don't think it's the case.  While different manufacturers do apply their own finishes to shell after they get it from Horween, those finishes aren't necessarily impacting the end result of the leather over the long term.  Once aftermarket shoe care products are used, the original out-of-box finish starts to change and become something new based on each individual's care routine.  Additionally, Bucksfan and Cold Iron both have excellent examples of Allen Edmonds shoes that have just as much aesthetic appeal as Mcarthur's in my opinion.  Mcarthur himself has also said that outdoor lighting and camera quality play a large role in the effect of his pictures as well.

post #29576 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post




Brushing is a proven method, for any type of leather, and will help prevent the leather from cracking after many years of wear.  Brushing leather is an age old method that is far older than Mcarthur.  It's part of the care for saddles and other leather equipment as well.  Part of what contributes to leather cracking in shoes (or any other leather articles) that are many years old (and are kept conditioned) is the microscopic accumulation of dust and grit in the creases.  This accumulation begins to act as an abrasive, destroying the leather by acting like sandpaper every time it flexes.  Brushing your shoes before wear to remove any accumulated dust before wearing them, and brushing them when you take them off to remove accumulated dust and dirt will keep you ahead of the game and help prevent the grit from settling into the creases.  Also, wiping the shoes with a damp cloth to remove any potential grit before you apply conditioner/polish will keep you from rubbing the grit into the leather fibers during shoe care.  Don't assume that just because the shoes look like they are dust/dirt free that they actually are.  Plenty of this abrasion happens at the microscopic level.  Turning microscopic surface grit into a nice paste to be rubbed into the fiber mat using your conditioner/polish isn't exactly good shoe care.

I don't think Mac started his "method" based on any scientific reasons.  Rather, he has figured out a way to get his shell shoes to shine at their best.  Essentially, less is more when it comes to getting a nice clean shine on shell.  I have no problem with that, or giving him credit for that.  However, I fully agree that some conditioner of some sort needs to be applied every now and then, regardless of what it does to the beloved shine.  No leather can survive to it's fullest potential without ever replacing lost oils, and shell is no exception.  Shell is very saturated from the factory with oils, and it certainly needs less care than calf to replace it, but that is finite.  I think that those who follow Mac's "Method" too literally will end up destroying their shoes over the long term (the definition of long term varies from person to person, and amount of wear).  Don't forget that Macarthur apparently has so many pairs of shoes that he only has to wear each pair a handful of times per year (given equal rotation).  At the rate of wear that he has, it makes perfect sense why he can have pairs that are 30 years old and still look relatively new with little care.  In other words, a pair of his shoes that are 30 years old, may have less wear on them than the average SF member's shoes after one year!  Don't miss that when you are deciding to blindly follow his care method!  I think there should be a disclaimer regarding this for any newbies that come along seeking to make their shell shoes last as long as possible, while still looking good as well.  You may lose some of your nice shine when you apply conditioning agents, but the shine will return, and the leather will have received some nourishment. 

With regard to the comment above about the "Method" only working on Alden... that's not the first time I've seen that possibility mentioned, but I don't think it's the case.  While different manufacturers do apply their own finishes to shell after they get it from Horween, those finishes aren't necessarily impacting the end result of the leather over the long term.  Once aftermarket shoe care products are used, the original out-of-box finish starts to change and become something new based on each individual's care routine.  Additionally, Bucksfan and Cold Iron both have excellent examples of Allen Edmonds shoes that have just as much aesthetic appeal as Mcarthur's in my opinion.  Mcarthur himself has also said that outdoor lighting and camera quality play a large role in the effect of his pictures as well.
Very well written and informative post as usual, MWS. What conditioner to be used on shell do you personally recommend?
post #29577 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by tifosi View Post


Very well written and informative post as usual, MWS. What conditioner to be used on shell do you personally recommend?

 

 

Now that's a whole new can of worms... :hide:

 

Nick Horween recommends Venetian Shoe Cream.  Those who are scared of petroleum distillates don't like the idea of using that, however.

 

Saphir Cordovan Cream is probably fine to use as well, or a small amount of Renovateur.

 

Some really like Lexol Conditioner.

 

If you want something mild that is made by an SF member (Glenjay), and doesn't use petroleum distillates, then I'd recommend these products: http://glenkarencare.com/gkcp/  These would be my highest recommendation.

 

The problem with most products on the market is that knowing what is in the ingredients is nearly as hard to find out as the secret recipe for Coca-Cola.

 

Since shell should only need to be conditioned a time or two per year (depending on wear), any product will probably be ok, and I would think it would come down to personal preference in the end.

post #29578 of 70737


couple of quick shots of my NEW bourbon hanover wholecut bals! Digging the color...
post #29579 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post


Now that's a whole new can of worms... peepwall%5B1%5D.gif

Nick Horween recommends Venetian Shoe Cream.  Those who are scared of petroleum distillates don't like the idea of using that, however.

Saphir Cordovan Cream is probably fine to use as well, or a small amount of Renovateur.

Some really like Lexol Conditioner.

If you want something mild that is made by an SF member (Glenjay), and doesn't use petroleum distillates, then I'd recommend these products: http://glenkarencare.com/gkcp/  These would be my highest recommendation.

The problem with most products on the market is that knowing what is in the ingredients is nearly as hard to find out as the secret recipe for Coca-Cola.

Since shell should only need to be conditioned a time or two per year (depending on wear), any product will probably be ok, and I would think it would come down to personal preference in the end.
I thought that I had read somewhere that Nick at Horween recommends VSC. That was the direction I was intending to go. I can't imagine something that MAY BE or perceived to be harmful to leather being endorsed by Horween.
I figured Saphire would be in the mix, too.
Personal preference is tough. It's not what I want...it's what my shell shoes want!
I may wear one pair of shell shoes once a week and not for 52 weeks a year straight. I would say maybe 26 or so wears a year. I think a once a year conditioning would be plenty.

Thanks for the link. I will have to look into that.
post #29580 of 70737

I believe Horween is now even selling their own branded VSC. I think I saw that online somewhere

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