or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread - reviews, pictures, sizing, etc...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread - reviews, pictures, sizing, etc... - Page 1821  

post #27301 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by bucksfan View Post

 

Cold Iron and others do the renomat stripping, but I never have.  I tend to stick to a damp cloth, serious brushing (especially early in a shoe's life, when the shell will "spew" in the rolls), and occasionally renovateur.  I find that a lot of the wax / cream that AE applies will come off with a damp cloth + brushing.  I use the damp cloth, brush for 5 minutes, damp cloth again....etc.  I stop when no more finish color is coming off on the cloth.  

 

I believe the answer to your question about whether adhering to the "Mac" method will accomplish the eventual removal of factory applied cream is yes.  It may take a while, but yes.  

 

 

Bucksfan, thanks, that was exactly the assurance I was looking for.  Plus, you anticipated my next question as well.

post #27302 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaywhyy View Post

Dove tail heel? Didn't know AE did that for their standard calf shoes.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NWTeal View Post

I was surprised as well. I prefer it, but definitely different. I can't remember if my black Norwich had the dove tail heel as well.  

 

They are certainly the exception to the rule, but a few are made with dovetail heels.  The Vernon is another one.  

post #27303 of 70737

PSA:

I'm working with AE on a couple cappuccino shell MTOs. Allison said there is only enough shell left for approx. 25 pair of shoes then they will not be getting any more. If you are thinking about a cappuccino MTO, I would get a move on!

 

I'm in for a Dundee and a Leeds!

post #27304 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by tifosi View Post

PSA:
I'm working with AE on a couple cappuccino shell MTOs. Allison said there is only enough shell left for approx. 25 pair of shoes then they will not be getting any more. If you are thinking about a cappuccino MTO, I would get a move on!
Thanks for the heads up! Wish I could justify a pair of Bayfields in cappuccino... alas, dollars.
post #27305 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by random-adam View Post


Thanks for the heads up! Wish I could justify a pair of Bayfields in cappuccino... alas, dollars.

I was just thinking about the Bayfields, too....But I need to stop!

post #27306 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by cincikid View Post

I am sure this has been discussed here gazillion times before, but if someone could help with getting the right size in the Strands, I will be grateful. So I wear 9E on a five last, but all my shoes on that last--the Neumok and the McTavish--are from the rough collection. I wear 9.5D in most other lasts, except for last 4 (9.5E) and 7 (10D). I got Strands in 9E and the fit is pretty tight. It's not as tight so that they would be impossible to wear, but it's certainly less comfortable than how I'd want them to fit.

 

What's your experience with the fit of the Strands? Should I try to break them; stretch them a bit or just return them? 

My Strands fit tighter than my McTavish, no doubt about it.  I wear 13B and ordered that size in both.  There is a difference, but the Strands will break in and maybe feel a little better over time as long as they are not unreasonably tight. 

post #27307 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by tifosi View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by chinngiskhaan View Post

does anyone know anything about the process of turning horse hide into cordovan leather?  does it have to be a certain type of horse?

 

... and yes I realize this question has little to do with this thread.

http://horween.com/leathers/shell-cordovan/

 

It isn't from just any part of the hide. It is from one particular area.


Also, it isn't horse hide.

post #27308 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

 

The only regular AE stores (non-outlets) I've been in are in DC and New Orleans.  If I remember correctly, those aren't actually real shoe trees.  They have a wooden heel, but the forepart was a triangular piece of foam.  

You are in fact correct MWS.  They function more as a decorative piece than a shoe tree.  She trees are generally unfinished cedar, which will absorb moisture.  The wooden material at the heel (that is finished) would not serve that purpose.

 

It is actually recommended that once every year or two, one should use a (very) light grit sandpaper on their trees to open up the fresh scent of the cedar and refresh the absorption capabilities of the trees.

post #27309 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReppTiePrepster View Post


Also, it isn't horse hide.

No, not technically I don't think, but it is how Horween refers to it as "part of a hide".

 

Shell Cordovan

Genuine Shell Cordovan is the art of tanning at its finest. More than just a color, it is a very specific leather, from a particular part of a horsehide.

post #27310 of 70737
post #27311 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by tifosi View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReppTiePrepster View Post


Also, it isn't horse hide.

No, not technically I don't think, but it is how Horween refers to it as "part of a hide".

 

Shell Cordovan

Genuine Shell Cordovan is the art of tanning at its finest. More than just a color, it is a very specific leather, from a particular part of a horsehide.


Technically, no.  It's the subcutaneous layer (beneath the hide) covering the equine posterior.  But I suppose one could interpret it as part of the hide.

post #27312 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReppTiePrepster View Post


Technically, no.  It's the subcutaneous layer (beneath the hide) covering the equine posterior.  But I suppose one could interpret it as part of the hide.

Agreed. nod[1].gif

post #27313 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReppTiePrepster View Post

You are in fact correct MWS.  They function more as a decorative piece than a shoe tree.  She trees are generally unfinished cedar, which will absorb moisture.  The wooden material at the heel (that is finished) would not serve that purpose.

 

It is actually recommended that once every year or two, one should use a (very) light grit sandpaper on their trees to open up the fresh scent of the cedar and refresh the absorption capabilities of the trees.

 

All of my shoe trees are cedar, but I try to be open minded about the possibility that we are all being indoctrinated with marketing at some level on this.  The scent of cedar, the insect repellant properties as well as potential properties for preventing fungal growth, and the dry porous nature of cedar are all claimed to be benefits of making trees from this wood.  All of these make perfect sense to me, and I don't really doubt any of it.  

 

However, these sources make one think about the merits of the counter argument and whether it really matters what your trees are made from:  

 

http://www.theshoesnobblog.com/2012/06/guide-to-shoe-trees.html

 

http://www.styleforum.net/t/19986/help-me-choose-beech-vs-cedar-shoetrees/0_100

 

I don't agree with everything Ron Rider posts, to be fair, but the fact that most of the world's most respected shoe manufacturers don't use cedar is interesting.  

post #27314 of 70737

Interesting reads.

post #27315 of 70737

Curious about others' thoughts on whether to get the new suede strand in AE's brogue suede or Carmina's version in snuff suede.  I think the shoes are fairly comparable and both fit my feet the same.  For me, it comes down to whether I want my one suede balmoral to be snuff suede or AE's brogue suede.  Any thoughts on which will be more versatile?  I can see myself wearing the shoes with gray flannel pants and a blazer in winter and gray and tan pants in Spring/Summer as well as jeans on occasion.  Any thoughts on which color will be most versatile?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
This thread is locked  
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread - reviews, pictures, sizing, etc...