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Allen Edmonds Appreciation Thread - reviews, pictures, sizing, etc... - Page 1073  

post #16081 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al in Philly View Post

AE Margates today.  Bought on eBay for $60 about 1.5 years ago.  Solid footwear.

 

 

Wow. I had no idea these ever existed. They're gorgeous!

post #16082 of 70737

they should make a Park Ave (slim edition) to prevent the bowing

post #16083 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al in Philly View Post

AE Margates today.  Bought on eBay for $60 about 1.5 years ago.  Solid footwear.

 

 

Great looking captoe bluchers.

post #16084 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJTraveler View Post

 

Ah, I see what you mean.  I've bought several used pairs on eBay and never had an issue with the previous owner's foot imprint.  If anything, I would imagine that because the shoe receives new cork from the re-crafting, that my foot creates a new imprint with the new cork.  But maybe I'm wrong?

 

It seems to me that it would be a relatively trivial issue, but I haven't ever bought used shoes to try it for myself.  To a degree, it seems that the high points in the original cork may move a bit to accomodate a new foot imprint, but probably not much.  Once new cork is applied during re-crafting, it would make sense that it would even out alot.  However, I don't think re-crafting completely eliminates your "broken in" insole.  After significant periods of time of standing and walking on the insole, the leather has formed a bit of a "memory" and will be more flexible and more compressed where the feet have been resting.  In other words, after re-crafting, even the insole still feels broken in and molded to your foot to a certain degree. 

post #16085 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by masernaut View Post

 

Wow. I had no idea these ever existed. They're gorgeous!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

 

Great looking captoe bluchers.

 

Thank you, gentlemen.  I actually sent several emails to AE to confirm they were real before I bought them.  The soles were slightly worn when I got them, but the uppers were in excellent condition.  They we're probably 10 years old when I bought them; definitely not worn frequently.

post #16086 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by kentyman View Post

redtomate and I were discussing this in a PM, but I figured I'd bring it back in the open to get y'all's input:

 

 

 

 

Any recommendations on a darker polish to keep that rich Bourbon color?

 

I was suspicious of their recommendation to just use Walnut polish from the beginning.  It doesn't quite make sense to me for the very reasons that the question is now being raised.  If the base color of the shoe is Walnut, and they are just burnishing them to darken them, then it is the added pigment from burnishing that will wear away first.  As the added pigment wears away, and if you are only replacing it with the original base color (Walnut), it seems only logical that your shoes will gradually transform back into Walnut shoes.  I am wondering if it is just their "temporary" recommendation until they come out with a more appropriate polish suited to this color.  Using the previously mentioned Saphir colors may work great.  If you are sticking with the offerings from Allen Edmonds, it seems that alternating with Walnut and perhaps a Dark Brown may be better than just using Walnut. 

post #16087 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

It seems to me that it would be a relatively trivial issue, but I haven't ever bought used shoes to try it for myself.  To a degree, it seems that the high points in the original cork may move a bit to accomodate a new foot imprint, but probably not much.  Once new cork is applied during re-crafting, it would make sense that it would even out alot.  However, I don't think re-crafting completely eliminates your "broken in" insole.  After significant periods of time of standing and walking on the insole, the leather has formed a bit of a "memory" and will be more flexible and more compressed where the feet have been resting.  In other words, after re-crafting, even the insole still feels broken in and molded to your foot to a certain degree. 

I know it doesn't.

A broken-in insole can be problematic when acquiring pre-owned shoes, if the insole has sufficiently molded to a prior owner's footprint, and if said footprint happens to be incompatible to yours.
post #16088 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by sevenfoldtieguy View Post


I know it doesn't.

A broken-in insole can be problematic when acquiring pre-owned shoes, if the insole has sufficiently molded to a prior owner's footprint, and if said footprint happens to be incompatible to yours.

 

Don't forget the "yuck" factor as well.  Having to keep the old insole may not be so bad with a pair of shoes that have been worn 12 or less times, but when you start getting beyond that and see the sweat stained imprint of the prior owner's feet . . . uhoh.gif

post #16089 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by sevenfoldtieguy View Post


I know it doesn't.

A broken-in insole can be problematic when acquiring pre-owned shoes, if the insole has sufficiently molded to a prior owner's footprint, and if said footprint happens to be incompatible to yours.

 

I would never have guessed that you would have experience with used shoes!  tounge.gif

post #16090 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by New Shoes1 View Post

 

Don't forget the "yuck" factor as well.  Having to keep the old insole may not be so bad with a pair of shoes that have been worn 12 or less times, but when you start getting beyond that and see the sweat stained imprint of the prior owner's feet . . . uhoh.gif

 

That is a major factor in why I have never considered it as well, but to each their own.  I think other people's feet are gross in general, so the thought of buying used shoes would never occur to me. 

post #16091 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

 

That is a major factor in why I have never considered it as well, but to each their own.  I think other people's feet are gross in general, so the thought of buying used shoes would never occur to me. 

 

Totally agree with you guys on the yuck factor.  However the discontinued 0 last line fits my foot perfectly, so I'm willing to take the risk to have a used pair re-crafted.  The 333 last comes close, but it's still not the 0 last.

post #16092 of 70737
Quote:
Originally Posted by kentyman View Post

 

 

 

 

Any recommendations on a darker polish to keep that rich Bourbon color?

Meltonian Fashion Brown is a perfect match for Bourbon. I use it on my Kenilworth's.

post #16093 of 70737
Some photos of my Allen Edmonds Park Avenue and Strand, both of which were purchased from the November 2012 Shoebank factory seconds sale ($300 + shipping for two pairs) and both are size 8.5E. EDIT - Oops. they're size 8E, not 8.5E.

ae03.jpg
ae04.jpg
ae07.jpg
ae08.jpg
ae09.jpg
ae10.jpg

The below photo is after I finally got around to pouring blood, sweat, and tears into applying the first two coats of polish a couple weekends ago. It took me three hours since it was my first time ever polishing shoes. I figure I'll get better and the shoes will get shinier with every subsequent coat... or at least I'm hoping so. wink.gif
ae11_zpsb83058a5.jpg
Edited by Karl Drogo - 2/20/13 at 7:56am
post #16094 of 70737
Before polishing further, read this and this, and watch this. You should be able to do it in about 15 minutes after you got the hang of it.
post #16095 of 70737
y'alls need to stop posting so much in this thread.

it gets too hard to keep up with and then I miss sales since I put off clicking on a thread with 2 thousand unread posts frown.gif
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