or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Gq editor to retire
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Gq editor to retire

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
here is a link to an article that may of some interest to some of you regrading the retirement of Art Cooper from the helm of GQ Magazine: http://www.adage.com/news.cms?newsId=37267
post #2 of 16
Thanks for this hermes...I didn't know he was stepping down. That might not be such good news for my favorite magazine, my man.
post #3 of 16
GQ has really struggled against competition from magazines such as Maxim,Details,and FHM,who target a younger demographic. The new editor will have the unenviable task of determining the future direction of the formerly venerable men's monthly. Does GQ continue to court the Gen Xers? Or distinguish itself by being more like The Robb Report?
post #4 of 16
Quote:
Or distinguish itself by being more like The Robb Report?
Let's hope so.. And I must say I just about burst a lung laughing when I saw your new signature quote (I've just ended a non-stop 17 hr day so my sense of humour may be slightly insane at the moment.) Where is it from?
post #5 of 16
Quote:
from A.Harris...And I must say I just about burst a lung laughing when I saw your new signature quote (I've just ended a non-stop 17 hr day so my sense of humour may be slightly insane at the moment.) Where is it from?
My new sig,dear sir,is from "The Pet Store",aka "The Dead Parrot" sketch,by Monty Python's Flying Circus. I'm very pleased that I could,in some small way,lighten your long day. Levity they say defies gravity.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
I think the magazine attempts to cater to yuppie readship by publishing articles on anything expensive or self-congratulatory to that demographic.
I have to agree with this statement.  I find that the Robb Report caters to the crassest and most ugliest form of consumerism - a perfect example of how money (or more likely, pretensions to such) can't buy class.
post #7 of 16
Actually, I'd like to describe what I see to be a typical Robb Report subscriber by paraphrasing from a Alan Richman (sp?) article I read in a recent issue of GQ: "An overpaid, over-dressed Wallstreeter ordering a three figure Cabernet he couldn't distinguish from a twenty dollar bottle of Merlot." I'm sure not everyone who read the Robb Report is, but it often seems that the magazine has this guy in mind. An article on how to manage your children's trust funds? (Dec. 2002) What if they become, horror of horrors, schoolteachers, and can hardly support themselves? C'mon now, people.
post #8 of 16
CT,LAGuy, I know what you mean about the pretensiousness of magazines like Robb Report and Millionaire. What I meant by "more like Robb Report" was a dedication to the finer things,be they grossly expensive or not. Perhaps the next version of GQ could be some sort of cross-pollination of the literary skills of Esquire and "old school" GQ,the sartorial flare of quintessential Flusser,leavened with some of Maxim's humor. Mustn't take things too seriously.  It's only fashion,for heaven's sake.  
post #9 of 16
What I like about Robb Report is that they frequently do very informative and well researched articles on top-quality clothing. I've learned a lot in their articles - many of the details they provide were completely new and hadn't been touched on in any other publication. The rest of the magazine is near worthless though unless you are a multi-millionare. You can buy a Kiton suit for $500 fairly easily. But try finding a Patek Phillipe or an Aston Martin at 12% of retail.. GQ actually has some great journalistic pieces. But it's supposed to be about style and it seems that most issues are about everything but. I'm buy Robb report and GQ because I want to learn about clothing. If I want to read about other things I'll buy a magazine specific to that subject. And even though Robb Report isn't a fashion magazine they are still more informative to me than GQ. In the end I'm with Mitch D. Hopefully GQ will combine the best of both worlds.
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
here's a further on line article with some interesting names for replacements for mr cooper: http://www.medialifemagazine.com/news200....ay.html
post #11 of 16
I think this is a good development, not in that Cooper had to go, but that GQ finds itself in a much different competitive landscape than during his long tenure.  The current lad magazines are the latest craze and GQ is visibly resisting the drift in that direction.  While great writing may have carried the day in decades past it's hard to hook today's young male reader without resorting to flash. IMHO, I find GQ a little over-bearing in its "investigative" journalism and too affected in its lifestyle, or domestic, articles.  I also think its focus on unattainable fashion alienates it from much of its reader base.  In other word GQ soldiers on as the "bible" of male fashion to a readership that cannot afford what it is offering.  Maybe it's just me, but I don't get much in the way of styling cues from most GQ fashion spreads. That said, I think the magazine is worth the cover price for Glenn O'Brien's Style Guy column.  The Personal Best section is the most visible nod to the news-you-can-use trend in men's magazines and I'd say they pull it off well. I do subscribe to GQ because it meets my two main subscription criteria, at least somewhat useful and under $1 an issue.  But I find British GQ a much better publication overall.   Now here's where it gets interesting.  British GQ editor Dylan Jones was the expected front runner for the American GQ slot.  He made a quick announcement that he had no intention of leaving his post and was not being considered for the job.  Of course he also professed loyalty to Si Newhouse and vowed to do whatever was asked of him.  My take is that those who observe these things think GQ is going to go for the "lad" market currently dominated by American offshoots of British magazines like Maxim and FHM.  Big mistake, so I hope not.  The man that might engineer a new more relevant GQ for the times is James Truman.  He's likely to be Si's right hand man on this one.  Truman was the original editor of Details which was ahead of the curve in many ways back in the 80's.  He vaulted up the Conde Nast corporate ladder and left Details to falter through a few incarnations.  Truman's not the wunderkind he once was.  His recent moves like placing Bonnie Fuller at Glamour didn't pan out.  The current Details however is the greatest magazine resurrection I have ever seen.  If that was Truman's handywork then he may be on to something. I wish Art Cooper well and congratulate him on steering his ship through through magazine and fashion trends that have come and gone.  The one constant has been "GQ" being synonymous with male fashion.  I hope it can remain relevant. Scott
post #12 of 16
Quote:
I also think its focus on unattainable fashion alienates it from much of its reader base.  In other word GQ soldiers on as the "bible" of male fashion to a readership that cannot afford what it is offering.
I disagree. I think that of late (the last year or so) GQ-USA has done a horrid job of covering fashion. It has consistently missed really interesting pieces, and been blatantly stupid in other advice. (The last issue of GQ I bothered to pick up was the one declaring patent Tod's bowling shoes to be "formal shoes". In particular, its spreads with similar items at different price-points are wasteful of space and stupid. A fashion magazine should show the interesting stuff, I think, be it couture or less expensive. Let the people who like a piece but can't afford it find their own damn knockoffs. Peace, JG
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
i think gq may be best to simply get someone fresh and with fresh ideas to make gq something reinvented but still gq david perez came into details basically admitting he had no idea what to do or where it was going but simply had an idea of what he wanted for a magazine and it's become fresh and inviting to read tyler brule did the same thing with wallpaper, he had a vision of what he wanted to see in a magazine, got some friends to help and some backing, and it just exploded (and alas wallpaper, although was getting a bit off and stale in his last year, went downhill fast once he was 'ousted', but is showing some signs of promise with their new editor) and this is all eerily similar to how art cooper came to gq, he simply took what he wanted for a men's magazine and ran with it and gq, a very marginal magazine before cooper, became a hit i don't think gq should compete with the maxims and fhms out there, it will fail, that's not what people perceive gq to be, the guys who read maxim or fhm are really buying it for the adolescent jokes, the racy humour, the barely clothed silicone throughout and although there is a fashion section in both mags, that's far from its main focus ........ as stated above, gq is looked to as the 'bible' for men, although it's scripture is sometimes off, behind or just plain whacky, and simply needs to refocus so perhaps gq needs to look from outside and not inside but it does need to have a hard look at some of the uk titles which just outdo usa gq hands down
post #14 of 16
Quote:
I disagree. I think that of late (the last year or so) GQ-USA has done a horrid job of covering fashion. It has consistently missed really interesting pieces, and been blatantly stupid in other advice. (The last issue of GQ I bothered to pick up was the one declaring patent Tod's bowling shoes to be "formal shoes".
With which point did you disagree?  That GQ is/was the "bible" of male fashion, or that is focuses too much on clothes most of its readers cannot afford to buy?  I missed that Tod's thing.  I'll go back and look for it.
Quote:
In particular, its spreads with similar items at different price-points are wasteful of space and stupid.
Interestingly I find this one of the best sections.  See, I like to know what's fashionable and what's new this season, but I am not going to spend thousands of dollars for it.  Maybe I'll buy one or two high-quality "timeless" pieces or maybe I will buy something at a much lower price point that fits well with a fashion trend. What I want from a magazine like GQ is to know what makes those expensive clothes better.  Sometimes it's a little ambiguous and sometimes it's just the name.  But often there are quality distinctions that the average buyer wouldn't know about.  So if I pick up a copy of GQ I have identified myself as interested in fashion.  And if I make less that $100k a year I probably won't buy $3500 suits.  I'd like to see some though and know what makes them better than $1000 suits.  And why those are better than $500 suits.  It doesn't have to be presented as fashion for dummies.  I know that better fabrics and better construction make better clothes.  But unless the differences are shown to me side by side I have a hard time making the distinction. Scott
post #15 of 16
UPDATE Art Cooper passed away June 9. He suffered a fatal stroke June 5 while lunching at the Four Seasons with Mens Health editior-in-chief David Zinczenko. He was 65. This may or may not be related, but sometimes people, especially men, seem to tie their self worth to what they do for a living. When they loose their job they often don't have anything to live for. Andy
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Gq editor to retire