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US waiters' worst conduct - Page 31

post #451 of 538
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman
BTW, where do you take Sacha to dinner?

We held it down a bit last year. The year before we ate at three ** places. I rarely eat in *** places; too many tourists there who have no idea of what they are doing or any understanding of French dining customs and traditions.

Last year we took E*****t (banned, therefore I dare not speak his name) to dinner at La Mediterranee, Bistro Marius, D'chez Eux, Bamboche (2nd meal there), Le Chiberta (one *), Thoumieux and Gallopin. Katia joined us at the last four of these. Also, Katia took us all to a very hip wine bar/restaurant, Les Papilles.

The wife and I had lunches at L'Ambassade d'Auvergne, Le Pamphlet, Chez Allard, Le Vaudeville, Bamboche and we also ate very lightly at a couple of cafes. Breakfast every morning was at the San Regis.

Every one of these is in Michelin, except for the cafes. Only one is starred. Where is a single tourist trap among these places?
post #452 of 538
I think Ernest should be taken to Chez Regine, in the words of Betty Catroux: "a very very very gay nightclub."

MAybe it's gone the way of Studio 54 and I don't mean the desperate Vegas version.
post #453 of 538
I tended on tables at the bar. for about a year. I was 19 then. This is what I have learned, your customers or the tables that have been assigned to the waiter do not really look at how much experienced you are. Beleive me or not they do get the vibes, if your clean hearted it works!
Here are some of the things I have learn't waiting on tables.
1) Smile when you appraoch.
2) No matter what take their orders on paper not in mind.
3) Serve them free stuff if you know ur cooks take long enough( Alwaya happens) serve thenm free stuff like drinks..No ones going to find out... just dont cheque then for minute stuff, If you know you have been late with your order.
4) Ask them how's the food.
5) Approach them for the last time usually when the lunch/dinner's done (with a smile) asking if they needed anything else.
6) Have a small conversation during this period of time.
7) Just Leave the vicinity of that table until they leave.
8) Guarantee a huge tip.

Although I know many waiter screw around on purpose. ( Apparently they do it, coz it makes their day and they have stories to tell for the later part of their night) -My advice, people out there, if your eating at a restaurant and you do find a waiter acting out. Just DONT TIP HIM/HER. They deserve that!
post #454 of 538
This thread is remarkable for having now run to over 30 very contentious pages without a single banning. I'd have thought that by now someone would have overheated and blown a gasket.
post #455 of 538
Just because I don't have anything better to do, and keep in mind that I have worked in higher end restaurants and even waited once or twice when short:

Quote:
Originally Posted by kennethpollock
In order:
(a) My name is Bruce and I'll be taking care of you tonight (who cares what his name is and his purpose is obvious)
(b) you guys (when some of the guests are ladies)
(c) folks (i.e., commoners)
(d) Do you have any questions about the menu? (an insult; I can read English and am an experienced diner)
(e) Let me get this out of your way (as he snatches away a plate that really was not in my way)
(f) my favorite dishes are ----- (who cares?)
(g) tonight's specials are --- (as he reels off 8-10 dishes; mind-boggling; why can't they print it, as the specials are the same nearly every night)
(h) plopping down the bill before it is requested
(i) placing the cork on the table, or even worse, holding it near my nose
(j) tying a napkin around the neck of the wine bottle
(k) what "temperature" do you want your steak? (I usually say "hot")

(A) When trained to be a waiter, you are forced to greet the customer like this. Almost everything else is optional. <B>That is one of the only things you are required to do.</B>
(B) In today's society, "you guys" generally means everyone in the party. In higher end restaurants I wouldn't reccomend greeting anyone like this regaurdless of gender.
(C) What the hell is wrong with folks? Do you honestly feel that using the word folks immediately drops you to the status of white trash?
(D) Another custom at nicer restaurants. It's polite anyways. If you worked at a retail store you are required to ask the customer "Can I help you with anything?". That is the same principle. It's part of being courteous.
(E) He doesn't know if it is in your way or not. For all he knows you could suffer an OCD and not like things that are being used in your presence.
(F) If you are having trouble deciding what you want to eat, he could feel that it would make your choice easier by telling you what he likes. He may ask if you like spicy food, sweet food, etc.
(G) If it isn't marked anywhere, expect him to tell you what the specials are. Hell, he may even tell you when they are on the menu. He doesn't know (nor does he give a shit) how often you eat there.
(H) If he is one of the only waiters working your general area, expect it. It saves him time and it saves you time. Does it really inconvenience you so much to have a small black booklet sitting on the corner of the table?
(I) A lot of waiters do that. They just forget. It's nice that they open the bottle in front of you just to proove that it is actually what you ordered and not just a $10 wine put in a empty $200 bottle. I'm sure you foget things to sometimes, but I'm not sure you do seem perfect.
(J) I don't even know where the napkin is supposed to go. I'm not allowed to serve alcohol.
(K) The same thing as "How would you like your steak cooked?" Would you rather have him look at you and guess you want it extra well or cold and bloody? When you respond with some smart ass remark such as "Hot" he <B>is</B> going to fuck with your food. That just gives him a reason right there.

So there you have it, I'm sure that a waiter would rather be helpful to someone that wasn't being a smart ass. You don't know what goes on in restauraunts. Even the manager won't bitch out a waiter that is messing with someones food that is being a jerk. So be kind and don't complain so much about what is usually customary to the job.
post #456 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oddly Familiar
(D) Another custom at nicer restaurants. It's polite anyways. If you worked at a retail store you are required to ask the customer "Can I help you with anything?". That is the same principle. It's part of being courteous.
Im gonna be pedantic now. In retail they train you to ask "how can I help you today" because open ended questions make you harder to shake off.
post #457 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by m@T
Im gonna be pedantic now.

In retail they train you to ask "how can I help you today" because open ended questions make you harder to shake off.

At Home Depot, you are supposed to be asked:

"What project are you working on today?"
post #458 of 538
Thread Starter 
Because it was so startling to me, I still remember the first times:
(a) a waitress introduced herself (first name). About 30 years ago, at a coffee and cake shop (wonderful cakes) opened by a California lady who had just come to Atlanta; it closed in just 3-4 years.
(b) a waitress called my wife and I "guys." About 15-20 years ago, at a place named Huey's in Atlanta. I immediately told her that my wife was not a guy (she is not Lesbian nor the least bit masculine). She said that she was from Brooklyn and called everyone "guys."
(c) A waiter asked if we had any questions about the menu. This was about 20 years ago, at a place named La Grotta in Atlanta. I did not realize that he was inquiring as to whether or not I was uncertain about any of the items listed on the menu. Perhaps I did not understand why he felt it was necessary to do that, as I did not need his permisson to so inquire, if I wanted to. Anyway, I took him literally. I thought he was asking if I had any concerns about the menu in its entirety. Therefore, I asked why the sign out in front of the place said "authentic Northern Italian" cuisine, when in fact, the menu was not Italian at all, much less northern Italian, but was very Americanized. He seemed somewhat startled and responded: "Well, our customers like it."
post #459 of 538
Bond: Who would want to kill me?
M: Jealous husbands, outraged chefs, humiliated tailors . . . the list is endless!
post #460 of 538
KP - if you had any desire of getting agreement from me, you could have started with the italian resteraunt issue. how come these places call themselves italian resterants and don't make any italian food?


Quote:
Originally Posted by kennethpollock
Because it was so startling to me, I still remember the first times:
(a) a waitress introduced herself (first name). About 30 years ago, at a coffee and cake shop (wonderful cakes) opened by a California lady who had just come to Atlanta; it closed in just 3-4 years.
(b) a waitress called my wife and I "guys." About 15-20 years ago, at a place named Huey's in Atlanta. I immediately told her that my wife was not a guy (she is not Lesbian nor the least bit masculine). She said that she was from Brooklyn and called everyone "guys."
(c) A waiter asked if we had any questions about the menu. This was about 20 years ago, at a place named La Grotta in Atlanta. I did not realize that he was inquiring as to whether or not I was uncertain about any of the items listed on the menu. Perhaps I did not understand why he felt it was necessary to do that, as I did not need his permisson to so inquire, if I wanted to. Anyway, I took him literally. I thought he was asking if I had any concerns about the menu in its entirety. Therefore, I asked why the sign out in front of the place said "authentic Northern Italain" cuisine, when in fact, the menu was not Italian at all, much less northern Italian, but was very Americanized. He seemed somewhat startled and responded: "Well, our customers like it."
post #461 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
KP - if you had any desire of getting agreement from me, you could have started with the italian resteraunt issue. how come these places call themselves italian resterants and don't make any italian food?

You guys are being disingenuous. When I go to the "China Sun" I know that I am going to get Americanized Chinese food. In fact, even in Hong Kong and Shanghai, if you go to a restaurant where the waiters speak even passable English, you are probably not getting the real deal. And Ken, that was Atlanta, 20 years ago. What did you really expect? I doubt that it would have been possible to even get the ingredients necessary to make real Northern Italian food.
post #462 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy
You guys are being disingenuous. When I go to the "China Sun" I know that I am going to get Americanized Chinese food. In fact, even in Hong Kong and Shanghai, if you go to a restaurant where the waiters speak even passable English, you are probably not getting the real deal. And Ken, that was Atlanta, 20 years ago. What did you really expect? I doubt that it would have been possible to even get the ingredients necessary to make real Northern Italian food.


yeah, but that is a matter of taste. I find it hard to eat italian and indian food in america, because I have eaten so much good food in each place, and it is hard to get authentic food here. frankly, I probrably have never really enjoyed authentic chinese food - the most authentic places I have eaten in almost to be able to say I ate there, and the places I have enjoyed the most in hong kong and mainland have probrably not been the most authentic. I am sure that american italian food has its merits, its just not my kind of food.
post #463 of 538
the more authentic the Chinese food, the more bland the taste. Not a fan.
post #464 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by m@T
the more authentic the Chinese food, the more bland the taste.

Not a fan.

What about Szechuan and Hunan (haven't had legit versions of the latter, but it's supposed to be spicy... the former definitely is)? I think you're mainly referring to Cantonese.
post #465 of 538
Cantonese food isn't bland. It's the Chiuchow cuisine, which is. Most Westernized versions of Chinese food tend to be Cantonese in derivation, and Chiuchow is lumped together with the Cantonese because of regional margins.
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