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US waiters' worst conduct - Page 29

post #421 of 538
I love it, the Macaroni grill.
post #422 of 538
I want someone to punch me if I ever use the words "din-din", "yummy", "delish", or "tummy".
post #423 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATM
I want someone to punch me if I ever use the words "din-din", "yummy", "delish", or "tummy".

...dude... you just did.
post #424 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim
...dude... you just did.
Next time I'm in Seattle, you get a free shot.
post #425 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATM
Next time I'm in Seattle, you get a free shot.
I eagerly await your arrival, much like the spider waits for the arrival of the fly. I have nearly infinite patience. I will bide my time and wait for the perfect moment to strike. Either that or I will fly to Detroits "suburbs" and just start punching everyone I see. I'll get to you eventually.
post #426 of 538
Of course, anybody who uses the term "din-din" is very much an authority.
post #427 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennethpollock
In order:
(a) My name is Bruce and I'll be taking care of you tonight (who cares what his name is and his purpose is obvious)
(b) you guys (when some of the guests are ladies)
(c) folks (i.e., commoners)
(d) Do you have any questions about the menu? (an insult; I can read English and am an experienced diner)
(e) Let me get this out of your way (as he snatches away a plate that really was not in my way)
(f) my favorite dishes are ----- (who cares?)
(g) tonight's specials are --- (as he reels off 8-10 dishes; mind-boggling; why can't they print it, as the specials are the same nearly every night)
(h) plopping down the bill before it is requested
(i) placing the cork on the table, or even worse, holding it near my nose
(j) tying a napkin around the neck of the wine bottle
(k) what "temperature" do you want your steak? (I usually say "hot")

I don't know what kind of restaurants you normally visit, but if this is how the events occurred it appears you went to a busy chain restaurant, like Outback or Carrabba's, as you say the specials are the same every night. This is frequently how the waitstaff deal with customers in those restaurants. If you went to a very expensive restaurant, I seriously doubt this waiter would have dealt with you in the manner you describe because high-end restaurants train the waitstaff to treat the customers differently, very professional but sometimes very distant. And, high-end restaurants usually don't have many specials and they are very rarely the same from night to night lest the special dish is not likely fresh any longer.

You visited a restaurant where the waiter was trying to be friendly and make you feel welcome. You're attitude about it is poor, and you are likely a very obnoxious customer. If you don't like the service you get at chain restaurants, don't go there anymore.
post #428 of 538
You don't like when the waiter puts the cork of the bottle he just opened for you, on the table? The cork can smell awry when the bottle is corked and therefore, giving the customer the cork and a small pour allows them to verify if the wine is appropriate.

Otherwise, your points are correct if not remarkably condescending. I work at a place in Connecticut ranked in the top 3 each year in service, my manager has hounded me for 2.5 years about speaking to a table properly and not being a pest to the guests. There was an article in the Times that conveyed your message in a much more endearing manner, and essentially said;

'You are my waiter, I am in a restaurant. I am not 'above' you, but I am here to eat and entertain my guest. Leave us alone and just do what we ask with as little interference at the table.'

Your gripes are understandable, but I would really dislike waiting on you, I never understood this whole 'lets put the waiter down' mindset that certain people have, but I feel so bad for those petty individuals.

And in our restaurant, in 2.5 years, I have never seen any food tampered with by waiters, but I expect that to be very uncommon.
post #429 of 538
If the wine is corked, it will show it. That is what the pour is for. Smelling the cork adds no value, especially since the nose quickly acclimates to TCA so one can't go around sniffing everything. And an off wine is easier to detect.
post #430 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
I just saw this, on a chicago food forum, and thought that it would fit in nicely with this thread. Romano's Macaroni Grill Fellow Foodie Friends, I just wanted to share our super din-din experience tonight at Macaroni Grill. Our waiter, Tad, was just super, friendly, well groomed and very bubbly personality, he told us he's an aspiring actor, how cool. Not only was Tad a super cool guy, but the restaurant itself was so inviting we ended up staying almost one full hour, just for dinner, can you imagine? Macaroni, don't you just love the name, had pictures of real Italians on the wall and, not just Italians, but cool old Italians like Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin. Macaroni also had pictures of Italy, no Eiffel Tower though, and played real Italian music, I recognized two songs from the Godfather movie and the theme song from the Sopranos. The food you ask, how was the food, just yummy, I mean really yummy, to die for. The pasta (means spaghetti, but in Italian) was just loaded with sauce, the meat balls were as big as soft balls and the portion was so huge that four of us could have shared. We also had pizza, which was just so delish, so loaded with cheese that it reminded me of a grilled cheese sandwich. We had vino (wine in Italian) and it was really really good, but it was white, not like my usual pinkish color that I like to order. I think it was a grigio, sort of like that cool movie with Ben and J-Low. As an aside, why do you think they call zinfandel white if it's really pink? Here's the coolest part, Macaroni (doesn't the name just sing Italian) just opened up near my house, my tummy is so very happy. Hope all my Fabulous Foodie Friends had a very yummy evening, I know I sure did. Enjoy,
who the hell wrote this?! ned flanders?!
post #431 of 538
Thread Starter 
I haven’t looked at this thread for several weeks. I do not speak French in American restaurants. One-two years ago, in response to a slur that everyone in Georgia only knew barbeque, I jokingly said in my neighborhood in Georgia, nearly everyone wore bespoke Savile Row to restaurants and spoke French there, as did the Russian aristocracy during the Czar.
I still must say that I don’t get it. I just don’t get it.
Obviously, some of you just do not know what you are talking about in saying that waiters at the French Laundry come up and tell guests their first names or that this is done at Michelin ** restaurants in Spain. This is simply absurd and false. Fine restaurants do not allow such behavior.
The issue is whether or not giant chains’ hick service, hereinafter “the treatment,” is just wrong or is just another type of service, instituted because their very particular type of customers want it. In the past, 30-40 years ago, no restaurants gave their customers “the treatment.” Not grand or modest ones here or abroad. It is still not done in fine restaurants here, in ethnic restaurants here, or in any other country in the industrial world. If “the treatment” is what customers at American chain restaurants really like and want, one must wonder why. If this is what they want, then one has to wonder why these customers are so unique. However, I submit that these customers of chain restaurants are not really a unique species and that there is spill-over. I submit that many of them also eat in fine restaurants and in ethnic restaurants. Take me. Although I mostly eat at better non-chain or ethnic restaurants, I also eat regularly at a Ruth’s Chris in Atlanta and have eaten at Morton’s and the Capital Grill about two times each. If the customers of chain restaurants are not so unique, but have tastes similar to the patrons who eat in fine restaurants here, in ethnic restaurants here, and in the restaurants in all of the other countries in the industrial world, then one must wonder why these other places do not give their customers “the treatment” too. Why do not all of these other places give their customers the type of service they really want, that is, the phony, high-pressure, hyped, hard-sell, hick treatment? Is it because they do not do surveys, do not read restaurant trade magazines, do not try to please their customers, or are just mean? I submit they know about as much about restaurant diners as do American chain restaurants, but have a more accurate idea of what most people really want.
So why are chain restaurants, in giving their customers “the treatment,” giving many of them a type of service that they do not really like or want? Why do they think it is profitable and why do they keep doing it? Lots of bad business practices are profitable, so big business here keeps doing it, such as telephone solicitation. I doubt that many people really enjoy telephone solicitation, but it must make money, or they would stop doing it.
I submit that “the treatment” results from the corporate mind-set of American business; push and push, hype and puff, sell and sell. They simply cannot restrain themselves. They cannot recognize that what might work once in a while for the lowest common denominator (a phrase first used by Alexis de Tocqueville in his book in 1835, “Democracy in America,” which expressed both a great deal of praise and horror about what was going on in this country) might offend many others.
It is amusing to see America hyped business tactics abroad or to suddenly re-discover them after being away for a while. About a dozen years ago, my wife and I went to France for three weeks, but flew back from Brussels. We stayed in French-owned hotels in France, but at the Hyatt for our last two nights in Brussels. During the three weeks in France, we ate the same continental breakfast daily, which was always described on a short card as consisting of orange juice, croissants, a small baguette or rolls, jam and coffee, tea or hot chocolate. However, when we went to breakfast at the Hyatt, we were surprised to be handed a huge laminated menu depicting smiling and dancing farmers, cows, chickens, etc. We read, in French, English and Flemish, the florid descriptions about the freshly squeezed juice from the finest oranges, the hot freshly baked breads from their own ovens, the marvelous creamery butter, etc. We expected something really terrific! Unfortunately, we got the exact same breakfast that we had been eating for the prior three weeks. The only thing extra that we got was the good old American puffery, hype and sales-pitch. It was funny. We had temporarily forgotten all about it.
post #432 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennethpollock
Lots of bad business practices are profitable


actually, if they are profitable over the long term, and ethical, then, by definition, they are good business practices.
post #433 of 538
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
actually, if they are profitable over the long term, and ethical, then, by definition, they are good business practices.

We once had a govenor here, Lester Maddox, who had many faults, but he often spoke the hard truth. In talking about an American big businessman, Gov. Maddox once said that he would sell the rope which they would use to hang his own mother, if he would make a profit. You seem to suggest that if someone's own mother was about to be legally executed, it would be "good business practice" for that person to sell the rope. I think I am not alone in going over and beyond the pure dollars and cents angle and thinking that "good business practice" to be a BAD business practice.
post #434 of 538
KP,

what you are basically saying is that one gets better service in small resteraunts, run by the owner, or with the owner on premises, or where the people who work their are profetionals who take great pride in their work. no surprise there.

what is suprising is that you seem to think that larger, more profitable places should act the same way. it may be nice, but not nessasaraly realistic.
post #435 of 538
Quote:
However, when we went to breakfast at the Hyatt, we were surprised to be handed a huge laminated menu depicting smiling and dancing farmers, cows, chickens, etc. We read, in French, English and Flemish, the florid descriptions about the freshly squeezed juice from the finest oranges, the hot freshly baked breads from their own ovens, the marvelous creamery butter, etc. We expected something really terrific! Unfortunately, we got the exact same breakfast that we had been eating for the prior three weeks. The only thing extra that we got was the good old American puffery, hype and sales-pitch. It was funny. We had temporarily forgotten all about it.

This is quite amusing.
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