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US waiters' worst conduct - Page 23

post #331 of 538
Bringing one's own glasses may sound silly but when one is having wine - and appreciating it - that could cost far more than the meal or one's shirt and tie, having the best stemware possible isn't such a ridiculous proposition, especially if one knows beforehand that the restaurant hasn't the proper provisions. I know I shouldn't let myself be affected by other diners, but it hurts me to see a fine wine sloshed down via a skimpy, one-size-fits-all glass.
post #332 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennethpollock
I think that they are close.
I also think that after one eats in USA chain restaurants for more than 2-3 times, and still does not recognize the Giant Chains Hick Service being what it is, a phony, hyped, sales-pitch and robtic con-job, but thinking that the waiter really is being "personal" and genuinely warm and enthusiastic towards one, makes that person so naive, unworldly, mindless and unsophisticated as to deserve being called a REDNECK.
http://www.answers.com/topic/bumpkin...nsophisticated

Face it: there's nothing you can do about it, you're outnumbered. Just enunciate before you sit down at a table how you wish to be served. Ignore the waiter's offended expression.
post #333 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02
Le Cab, Paris. Ernest was unimpressed with the scenery, but I had never been to Freedom before.

I'm under the impression that there are a disproportionate amount of homosexuals there and the surrounding area.
post #334 of 538
What, Paris and the surrounding area? I don't know, I didn't get hit on all night long
post #335 of 538
LE CAB
2 Pl. du Palais Royal
Paris
Tel: 58 62 56 25
info@cab.fr
www.cabaret.fr

Jet-setty Jacques Garcia's original look for this louche boudoir-like bar-restaurant across the street from the Palais Royal has just been updated by Franco-Japanese designer Ora Ito. And assuming you get past face control, it's a sexy and very chilled-out place to spend an evening. Who can resist lounging on one of the big donut-shaped banquettes or the cozy bedlike niches while sipping a caipirinha or a Pisco sour? Frequented by models and their followers, it also pulls young aristos, both local and visiting. The result: one of the most jaw-droppingly beautiful crowds to be found anywhere in Paris on any given night.
post #336 of 538
Have an Outback Steakhouse Father's Day;
Celebrate Dad, the Outback way;
It's the perfect way to say,
"We love you, Dad!";
The Outback way.
post #337 of 538
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
I have to add to that

1. formal resteraunt dinning is maybe 6 or 7 generations old. Michelen is 3. that is not an awful lot of time for a tradition, followed by a few hundred thousand people in one corner of the world, to set standards for all times.

2. it would help me out with your whole concept of class if I didn't know that you were using Earnest as your personal guide to the world of class, and if I didn't have a mental picture of you sitting in a resteraunt in Altanta speaking french with other english speakers in order to be sophisticated, or of you going to a resteraunt carrying your own wine glasses. Again, in the same way that you might joke about people who enjoy boxed wine, I have had a number of laughs about your little french speaking sessions and your personal wine glasses with some of my sophisticated friends. and that is part of what makes the world go around, Mr. P, diffrent tastes for different people.

1. The first Michelin guide that I bought new was in 1971, but I also picked up a used one from 1954. I think the guide goes back to 1905. It was the first guide book and the first to award stars.
2. Actually, my Reidel carrying case carries, in addition to two huge, lovely and light wineglasses (made by Rosenthall), a wine clip (a small portable object that is a good substitute for a bulky wine basket), a box of small metal tin-foil like objects (I forget their name) to insert in the wine bottle to prevent drips, 3-4 real espresso spoons (since so many places lack them) and several little plastic one ounce bottles of Orgeat (almond syrup) and mint syrup, so that I can have a Perroquet or Moresque, if the place has a bottle of Ricard, pastis or even Pernod. What would your friends think of that?
post #338 of 538
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
Face it: there's nothing you can do about it, you're outnumbered. Just enunciate before you sit down at a table how you wish to be served. Ignore the waiter's offended expression.


Outnumbered indeed!!!!!!!!!
In what Country?
On what Continent?
post #339 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennethpollock
1. The first Michelin guide that I bought new was in 1971, but I also picked up a used one from 1954. I think the guide goes back to 1905. It was the first guide book and the first to award stars.
2. Actually, my Reidel carrying case carries, in addition to two huge, lovely and light wineglasses (made by Rosenthall), a wine clip (a small portable object that is a good substitute for a bulky wine basket), a box of small metal tin-foil like objects (I forget their name) to insert in the wine bottle to prevent drips, 3-4 real espresso spoons (since so many places lack them) and several little plastic one ounce bottles of Orgeat (almond syrup) and mint syrup, so that I can have a Perroquet or Moresque, if the place has a bottle of Ricard, pastis or even Pernod. What would your friends think of that?
You consider making your own drinks at your table less unsophisticated than taking some of your food home so it doesn't go to waste?
post #340 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
You consider making your own drinks at your table less unsophisticated than taking some of your food home so it doesn't go to waste?

Shhhh, just as he was adapting...
post #341 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennethpollock
I think that they are close.
I also think that after one eats in USA chain restaurants for more than 2-3 times, and still does not recognize the Giant Chains Hick Service being what it is, a phony, hyped, sales-pitch and robtic con-job, but thinking that the waiter really is being "personal" and genuinely warm and enthusiastic towards one, makes that person so naive, unworldly, mindless and unsophisticated as to deserve being called a REDNECK.
http://www.answers.com/topic/bumpkin...nsophisticated

Let's try extending this logic to another form of human relationship and see if it comes off similarly crass and cynical:

"I also think that after one has had more than a few girlfriends, and still does not recognize female sexuality for what it is--a phony, contrived, gold-digging, transactional exchange of sex for money and status--but thinks that the woman is being 'loving' and genuinely warm and enthusiastic, makes that person so naive, unworldly, mindless, and unsophisticated as to deserve being called a redneck."

Yep!

Who says these horrible unsophisticates don't realize what's going on? Just because many people play a game doesn't mean emotions can't be genuine. Plus, even when they aren't genuine, sometimes it's nice to pretend, no? If given a choice between a surly and subservient waiter who makes no effort to view me as anything more than a tip machine and a waiter who fronts as a friendly, engaging person in order to comply with corporate mandates... I can imagine many people choosing the latter despite knowing full well what's going on, because plenty of people prefer familiarity regardless. It makes them more comfortable, and that's part of what they look for in their dining experience.

I think that, rather than being ignorant, unsophisticated rednecks, most of them are probably operating one step beyond you. They just don't get bent out of shape about it.
post #342 of 538
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
You consider making your own drinks at your table less unsophisticated than taking some of your food home so it doesn't go to waste?

I VERY, VERY discreetly hold the glass under the table and pour the contents of one of the bottles into it. I do not think anyone has ever noticed, but a few waiters have been rather startled to see that the beige drink they served me a few minutes before had become bright green (when I am making a Perroquet). A Moresque is about the same color as the original drink.

Those of us from the 1950s, who had to keep a brown bag under the table in many "dry" cities, are rather adept at doing this.
post #343 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennethpollock
I VERY, VERY discreetly hold the glass under the table and pour the contents of one of the bottles into it. I do not think anyone has ever noticed, but a few waiters have been rather startled to see that the beige drink they served me a few minutes before had become bright green (when I am making a Perroquet). A Moresque is about the same color as the original drink.

Those of us from the 1950s, who had to keep a brown bag under the table in many "dry" cities, are rather adept at doing this.
Do you use the same discretion when substituting your own wine glasses?
post #344 of 538
That's cooler than the cap-wearing crowd's visual rebellion.
post #345 of 538
I also want to add that in some countries it is becoming popular to bring one's own utensils to restaurants for sanitary and environmental reasons.
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