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US waiters' worst conduct - Page 22

post #316 of 538
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
please do not take this as an insult, Mr. P, but I am totaly blown away at the thought of the educational and sociological process that left you able to operate a computer and, apparently, function as a successful litagator as well as a food critic, and yet, just as apperently, has allowed you to reach mature adulthood with a lack of context and understanding of the demographics of the United States, such a narrow world view and such poor logical reasoning. it staggers the mind. in discusing this case with a few people, we were left wondering if this was due to the structure of the upper middle classes in Atlanta, or if this was a purely personal phenomenon.

in any event, have a nice day, my name is Zach and I will not be waiting on you today.

Are you saying that this is basically a nation of rednecks?
Obviously, the myth that there are some in France, too, is about as true as claiming that some Frenchwomen are fat.
PS Thanks for the promotion to the upper middle class.
post #317 of 538
I feel fat today, does that count?
post #318 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennethpollock
Are you saying that this is basically a nation of rednecks?
Obviously, the myth that there are some in France, too, is about as true as claiming that some Frenchwomen are fat.
PS Thanks for the promotion to the upper middle class.

You have yet to spell out exactly why the preference for a less formal, more personable dining experience, up to and including knowing your server's name, makes one a "redneck". I'm dying to know--please enlighten us!

FWIW: I don't really care what my waiter's name is either, and I don't expect him to care what mine is, but I'm a cynical, misanthropic SOB, and I'm more likely to associate my distaste for overly familiar waitstaff to my own cynical misanthropy than to a vast conspiracy designed to turn us all into rednecks. I'm just playing the odds there, but hey, maybe I'm wrong.
post #319 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
LIAR!
Oops, I seem to have done it again.
post #320 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennethpollock
Are you saying that this is basically a nation of rednecks?
Obviously, the myth that there are some in France, too, is about as true as claiming that some Frenchwomen are fat.
PS Thanks for the promotion to the upper middle class.


I am saying

1. suggesting that wanting to know one's waiters name makes one a redneck suggests a poor understanding of what makes a redneck

2. that the vast majority of the 240 plus million people who make up this nation have tastes that will be very different from yours and mine

3. that while it makes sense to say that your favorite dinning experiece is one that is as similar as possible to that enjoyed and prefered by a few hundred thousand people in a tiny corner of western europe is perfectly acceptable and rational. to suggest that this is the only acceptable ideal of dinning experince for the other 6 billion or so other people on the planet does not seem to be very rational.

4. that life is too short to have a fit because your waiter introduces himself.
post #321 of 538
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02
Mr P, when I went to dinner with e****t. he described the clientele as "rednecks." Paris, France; not Paris, Texas. Just for some context.


I just heard from E****t (banned, so I dare not speak his name):

"You can tell TIGER that the place was a trendy places full of TOURISTS!!!!! or wannabies who just want to be seen
"Sarah went there several time, so you imagine who can go into it
"so a place for French rednecks and tourists and the music style of the disco which is part of the restaurant is rather hip/hop, so a place for b****s [censored] and a***s [censored] after the dinner."
post #322 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
I am saying

1. suggesting that wanting to know one's waiters name makes one a redneck suggests a poor understanding of what makes a redneck

2. that the vast majority of the 240 plus million people who make up this nation have tastes that will be very different from yours and mine

3. that while it makes sense to say that your favorite dinning experiece is one that is as similar as possible to that enjoyed and prefered by a few hundred thousand people in a tiny corner of western europe is perfectly acceptable and rational. to suggest that this is the only acceptable ideal of dinning experince for the other 6 billion or so other people on the planet does not seem to be very rational.

4. that life is too short to have a fit because your waiter introduces himself.

That pretty much sums what I've been saying, and in a less aggressive tone than I've been using, to boot.

Also, in response to the whole "rednecks" discussion, I see nobody in the opposing camp that's accepted your premise that certain dining preferences inherently mean that a person is a redneck. I think at the very least most of us deserve an elucidation of why exactly preferring informal service or engaging in some of the behaviors outlined in your "bill of rights" (e.g. packing up food to go; I don't see what's so low-class about wanting to get one's full money's worth out of expensive food that has been paid for) makes a person worthy of being called a hick. Arguments that don't rely on appeals to tradition (it's always been that way since I started dining out) or begging the question (sophisticated diners prefer X, I know this because my European friends and prefer X, and we're sophisticated diners) would be greatly preferred.
post #323 of 538
It seems rednecks is being used interchangeably with unsophisticates.
post #324 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by kennethpollock
I just heard from E****t (banned, so I dare not speak his name):

"You can tell TIGER that the place was a trendy places full of TOURISTS!!!!! or wannabies who just want to be seen
"Sarah went there several time, so you imagine who can go into it
"so a place for French rednecks and tourists and the music style of the disco which is part of the restaurant is rather hip/hop, so a place for b****s [censored] and a***s [censored] after the dinner."

Hah, yeah, that sounds like our mutual friend. French rednecks: his words, not mine. About half the clientele appeared to be foreigners studying in France, though I guess they could have been tourists. Watch which women you bring up, I don't know if Dave is still around...

(Dave? You around? We miss you)

edit--Mr P, the fact that you are still sticking around makes me think that even though you are serious about the BoR, you don't take yourself too seriously. Kudos for that.
post #325 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by aybojs
That pretty much sums what I've been saying, and in a less aggressive tone than I've been using, to boot.

Also, in response to the whole "rednecks" discussion, I see nobody in the opposing camp that's accepted your premise that certain dining preferences inherently mean that a person is a redneck. I think at the very least most of us deserve an elucidation of why exactly preferring informal service or engaging in some of the behaviors outlined in your "bill of rights" (e.g. packing up food to go; I don't see what's so low-class about wanting to get one's full money's worth out of expensive food that has been paid for) makes a person worthy of being called a hick. Arguments that don't rely on appeals to tradition (it's always been that way since I started dining out) or begging the question (sophisticated diners prefer X, I know this because my European friends and prefer X, and we're sophisticated diners) would be greatly preferred.



I have to add to that

1. formal resteraunt dinning is maybe 6 or 7 generations old. Michelen is 3. that is not an awful lot of time for a tradition, followed by a few hundred thousand people in one corner of the world, to set standards for all times.

2. it would help me out with your whole concept of class if I didn't know that you were using Earnest as your personal guide to the world of class, and if I didn't have a mental picture of you sitting in a resteraunt in Altanta speaking french with other english speakers in order to be sophisticated, or of you going to a resteraunt carrying your own wine glasses. Again, in the same way that you might joke about people who enjoy boxed wine, I have had a number of laughs about your little french speaking sessions and your personal wine glasses with some of my sophisticated friends. and that is part of what makes the world go around, Mr. P, diffrent tastes for different people.
post #326 of 538
Sounds like quite the cesspool. Where was it?
post #327 of 538
Le Cab, Paris. Ernest was unimpressed with the scenery, but I had never been to Freedom before.
post #328 of 538
Speaking French makes you sophisticated? Now, that's really cool.
post #329 of 538
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoopee
It seems rednecks is being used interchangeably with unsophisticates.


I think that they are close.
I also think that after one eats in USA chain restaurants for more than 2-3 times, and still does not recognize the Giant Chains' Hick Service being what it is, a phony, hyped, sales-pitch and robtic con-job, but thinking that the waiter really is being "personal" and genuinely warm and enthusiastic towards one, makes that person so naive, unworldly, mindless and unsophisticated as to deserve being called a REDNECK.
http://www.answers.com/topic/bumpkin...nsophisticated
post #330 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoopee
It seems rednecks is being used interchangeably with unsophisticates.

Xactly.
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