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US waiters' worst conduct - Page 21

post #301 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by aybojs
And while globetrotter beat me to making the general point, it's pretty amusing to see how far into denial someone will go to avoid coping with the fact that his opinion is in the vast minority, and not because of rampant ignorance and stupidity and the part of everyone who disagrees with him. Let's see, which sounds more logical: a) owners who want to take advantage of a large general market responding to customer feedback of said market by adjusting their restaurant management habits accordingly or b) a vast and malicious conspiracy involving shady marketing departments and middle managers working to spite traditionalist diners and subvert the concept of a restaurant by brainwashing the ignorant masses like us (who cannot think for themselves and can only parrot what is foisted on them by the aforementioned conspirators) into believing that only familiar and informal service is acceptable? You don't need a 180 on the LSAT to figure out which is the more viable conclusion.

You're one of them!
post #302 of 538
Thread Starter 
[quote=aybojs] the ignorant masses like us (who cannot think for themselves and can only parrot what is foisted on them by the aforementioned conspirators) into believing that only familiar and informal service is acceptable? QUOTE]

These are the Americans that Will Rogers and Oscar Wilde were talking about, but I would prefer to believe that they do not represent the majority of Americans.
Not being certain, I turned to my French friend, the banned E****t, for his opinion. He said that there were indeed a lot of rednecks in this Country, such as people who wore caps, shorts and sneakers or flip-flops to nice restaurants and reminded me that I had previously complained about them here.
http://styleforum.net./showthread.php?t=9184
Maybe he is right. I certainly recognize that "redneck chic" is "in," based upon what I have observed out there in attire, all the pick-up trucks, and people apparently liking restaurants that look like warehouses. However, without actually seeing the questions in the surveys which supposedly elicited that many Americans really do want to be treated as hicks, I cannot be 100% sure. But please Lord, say that it is not so.
post #303 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim
Well it obviously falls into one of the three reasons why things suck (by Ken):

Americans invented it, so it couldn't be correct

It is what people of lower social status drink

They do not serve it in Michelin rated restaraunts.

Americans did not invent pink wines... You may want to look at the Egyptians for that. I think blush/rose type wines have their place with some dishes, summer dishes, barbecues, pizza (I know, it's beer in America...), grilled fish, etc. Ah, a chilled Côtes de Provence on a warm summer day...
post #304 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
Americans did not invent pink wines... You may want to look at the Egyptians for that. I think blush/rose type wines have their place with some dishes, summer dishes, barbecues, pizza (I know, it's beer in America...), grilled fish, etc. Ah, a chilled Côtes de Provence on a warm summer day...

I think you missed the point of my joke.
post #305 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim
I think you missed the point of my joke.
No, I assure you I got it.
post #306 of 538
Mr P, when I went to dinner with e****t. he described the clientele as "rednecks." Paris, France; not Paris, Texas. Just for some context.
post #307 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nantucket Red
Let's cut to the chase and call this process the commodification of the dining experience, which is essentially what is happening. The dining experience is being turned into a prepackaged commodity that is a completely uniform, known quantity.

When this process is complete, arcane social codes of dining, such as putting both your knife and fork on the same side of your plate to signal that you've finished eating, will fall by the wayside, replaced by an egalitarian "can I get that out of your way for you?" Then we will all be able to rejoice in getting the same standard of service.


agreed, and I would agree that this is not what I am looking for in a dinning experience. but in the same way that I have not had to resort to wearing comodity clothing, I have been able to find dinning expereinces that fit what I am looking for. but we should not fool ourselves, the market is doing the pushing for this "comodification".
post #308 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02
Mr P, when I went to dinner with e****t. he described the clientele as "rednecks." Paris, France; not Paris, Texas. Just for some context.

It might clarify things to have Ernest give us his French translation.
post #309 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
It might clarify things to have Ernest give us his French translation.
I would have called them "Eurotrash," but that's not very PC. Very scene and be seen. Women in low cut dresses or shirts and tight jeans or pants. Didn't notice the men
post #310 of 538
[quote=kennethpollock]
Quote:
Originally Posted by aybojs
the ignorant masses like us (who cannot think for themselves and can only parrot what is foisted on them by the aforementioned conspirators) into believing that only familiar and informal service is acceptable? QUOTE]

These are the Americans that Will Rogers and Oscar Wilde were talking about, but I would prefer to believe that they do not represent the majority of Americans.
Not being certain, I turned to my French friend, the banned E****t, for his opinion. He said that there were indeed a lot of rednecks in this Country, such as people who wore caps, shorts and sneakers or flip-flops to nice restaurants and reminded me that I had previously complained about them here.
http://styleforum.net./showthread.php?t=9184
Maybe he is right. I certainly recognize that "redneck chic" is "in," based upon what I have observed out there in attire, all the pick-up trucks, and people apparently liking restaurants that look like warehouses. However, without actually seeing the questions in the surveys which supposedly elicited that many Americans really do want to be treated as hicks, I cannot be 100% sure. But please Lord, say that it is not so.



please do not take this as an insult, Mr. P, but I am totaly blown away at the thought of the educational and sociological process that left you able to operate a computer and, apparently, function as a successful litagator as well as a food critic, and yet, just as apperently, has allowed you to reach mature adulthood with a lack of context and understanding of the demographics of the United States, such a narrow world view and such poor logical reasoning. it staggers the mind. in discusing this case with a few people, we were left wondering if this was due to the structure of the upper middle classes in Atlanta, or if this was a purely personal phenomenon.

in any event, have a nice day, my name is Zach and I will not be waiting on you today.
post #311 of 538
Provencal rose isn't really "blush wine" as the term is generally used. That wikipedia article is remiss in grouping the two together. Bone dry roses are very nice indeed.
post #312 of 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoopee
Provencal rose isn't really "blush wine" as the term is generally used. That wikipedia article is remiss in grouping the two together. Bone dry roses are very nice indeed.

Isn't it just a different (regional?) term for a **relatively** similar end product? I was recently in the south of France, and I tasted plenty of what I would consider sweet rose wines. Or maybe the term should be "fruity"?

If we start making such distinctions, then we have to find another name for California cabernets...
post #313 of 538
Once a waiter pulled a gun on me and told me that he had been waiting 20 years for his revenge on the "famous" FNB who had made his village go broke buying great clothes. Apparently, his village had had to file chapter 7, which in his native Yokelstan meant that everyone's ability to vote on Idol was revoked. He was explaining my demise to me with such smugness that i was able to manage a Chuck Norris like roundhouse kick to the head. Unfortunately, all the other waiters and customers were also from his village but unrecognizable to me because they were all far too well dressed, and broke, and I had to battle them all "Octagon" style. I was able to narrowly escape but i did hear the parting threat "Next time FNB, next time." Then they all broke out into a chorus of "She grinds."

To top it off, my date turned out to be a femme bot.
post #314 of 538
If it bends, it's funny. If it breaks, it's not funny.
post #315 of 538
I want my baby back, baby back, baby back, baby back, baby back, baby back, baby back, I want my baby back, baby back, baby back, baby back, baby back, baby back, baby back...
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