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Fighters? - Page 8

post #106 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
I have seen it, I know what you mean - I just wish I could do it. I have a great fighting stance - I call it "short fat old man trying to talk you out of beating him up"

It's easy. 1) Start by standing in a low horse stance for half an hour tonight. Keep everything but your arms flexed. Breath deep and slowly. Flex arms as you exhale. Tomorrow 2) Do one full hour. Repeat 2) daily. Great for your quads!
post #107 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy
It's easy. 1) Start by standing in a low horse stance for half an hour tonight. Keep everything but your arms flexed. Breath deep and slowly. Flex arms as you exhale. Tomorrow 2) Do one full hour. Repeat 2) daily. Great for your quads!

thanks - I am actually working now on trying to get my squat back to what it was when I met my wife. when I can do that - maybe around next january is the target date, maybe I will go back to working on my low horse stance.
post #108 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13
Was s/he at the Apple store?
Nope, this was a rastafarian in Kabukicho. He wouln't stop following me and telling me about the strip club he was promoting. I told him about a dozen times to leave me alone, but when he grabbed me under my arm and laid his hand on my shoulder trying to pull me down this semi-darkened alley between buildings, I had about enough. I'm pretty sure I burst or mangled his eyeball with my knuckle, but I didn't really examine him afterwards. My hand was all wet and slimy afterwards though and there might have been blood, I don't really remember. There was a cop standing literally thirty feet away, but he didn't look like he felt like helping me out as the dirty rasta tried to drag me into the alleyway. After I punched him I looked at the cop, who was smiling at me. He made no move to help the guy on the ground clutching his face. I think if he could have given me a thumbs up or something, he probably would have. All you Tokyo members out there, keep your eyes peeled for a rasta with an eyepatch, working around the Kabukicho "gentleman's club" area. You know, while you are passing through that area on your way to an important meeting or whatever.
post #109 of 123
Thread Starter 
Kind of a scary story, Tokyo. Nice move, anyway. LA Guy, I think we just called that horse stance, but a wider one My teacher would have us do back stances (the classic Jackie Chan fighting stance, where all the weight is on the back leg, and both feet face forward and knees are at about 60º angles), then lift the front leg, go down into a sit, and come back up. Kind of like one-legged squats but much more balanced. She'd also take a southern staff and swing it about a foot above ground and we had to jump over it and do Lotus kicks (the aerial backwards spinning outside kick, slapping the opposite hand). I caught it a few times and had some nasty bruises from that, but I'll be damned if I didn't start getting some sweet jumps on my Lotus kicks. :P Im not really sure of most names except for the five stances and the kicks. My teacher only spoke a few words of English, such as "go fasta!" "mo powa!!" and "1 2 go! sweep!" and then "you go school after this? maybe you go sleep." If she was going to teach us a new technique she would usually just say "do this one."
post #110 of 123
This thread is better with video.google.com

http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...amrage&pl=true
That is a compilation of great comebacks in MMA.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...=fedor&pl=true
The most recent Fedor Emelianenko fight. He is the best fighter in the world right now.
post #111 of 123
Damn you Brian,

I haven't done that exercise in years, tried it just now (after reading your post) and gave myself a cramp. You have to be flexible, especially in the calves and quads, to do that correctly (back foot planted firmly on the ground), and years of running and not enough stretching have taken a lot of that away.

As for the Lotus kick - very useful in tournaments both the spinning back and forward (outside to in) versions. Fast (much faster than a round house), great for parrying front, back, and round house kicks, and easily done with the leading leg. Problem is that it is not that powerful though, and opens up the body. I used to move in on that kick with my elbows in to protect my side, and use a jab, hook, cross combination to soften up opponents for take downs.

And that is a very accurate description of how many (if not most) Chinese teaching is done. No fancy names, no fancy rituals, just "So this, do that" and a stick that whacked you when you screwed up. For tournaments, we were given some simple instructions: " Never can block everything. Very much keep on punching. Very much like animal." Worked pretty well. Only once in a while would we be instructed to use a specific stance to counter an opponents strengths (like using very low defensive stances against tall, kicky opponents.) The names we had were quite evocative though: Wild Animal, Plant pitfall and trap ( which had a double fisted punch, sort of a Streetfighter II move). Now that I think about it, I guess that my sifu (incidentally, he trained the same place that Jet Li trained) taught us a lot of Southern techniques as well.

Tokyo. Damn man - smashing some dudes eyeball? That is some impact. Who are you? George Foreman?

Fok.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD
Kind of a scary story, Tokyo. Nice move, anyway.

LA Guy, I think we just called that horse stance, but a wider one

My teacher would have us do back stances (the classic Jackie Chan fighting stance, where all the weight is on the back leg, and both feet face forward and knees are at about 60º angles), then lift the front leg, go down into a sit, and come back up. Kind of like one-legged squats but much more balanced.

She'd also take a southern staff and swing it about a foot above ground and we had to jump over it and do Lotus kicks (the aerial backwards spinning outside kick, slapping the opposite hand). I caught it a few times and had some nasty bruises from that, but I'll be damned if I didn't start getting some sweet jumps on my Lotus kicks. :P

Im not really sure of most names except for the five stances and the kicks. My teacher only spoke a few words of English, such as "go fasta!" "mo powa!!" and "1 2 go! sweep!" and then "you go school after this? maybe you go sleep." If she was going to teach us a new technique she would usually just say "do this one."
post #112 of 123
There's too much talkin and not enough ass kickin in this thread.

post #113 of 123
Ken, that's classic. Reminds me of Kramer:

"Jerry, it's not our age, it's our skill level!"
post #114 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy
Tokyo. Damn man - smashing some dudes eyeball? That is some impact. Who are you? George Foreman? Fok.
I would be wearing a five button suit and shilling my grill if I was. Story time! I used to live in a "group home" for uh "problem" children in Albuquerque, NM. One of the "counsellors" there was into boxing. He worked there as community service or something. One day while we were getting our "yard time" he lined us all up to punch him in the stomach. He said he could take it. There were about 20 of us. Anyways, I was last in line, and when the kid before me went, it looked like he hit the dude pretty hard, our punching bag made an "oofta" noise and grinned. I didn't say anything to him, didn't look in his eyes, walked up to him, stretched my arms behind my back, cracked my neck, and whipped my right hand right into his navel. I used good form, driving through the punch with my hips and snapping it back at the right moment. I was intending to hit him as hard as I could, since that was what he said he wanted, but I felt kinda bad cause he was two or three inches shorter than I was at the time, so I held back a little at the last second. I evidently hurt him anyways. He stopped smiling and started to stare me down. I thought he was gonna kill me. It was pretty scary. It took a couple seconds, but he cleared his head and kind of pantomimed like he was shoving his guts back into his abdomen. We laughed about it and he told the other kids not to fight me, cause I'd kill them. I felt like such a badass... Needless to say one kid didn't pay attention, and eventually I had to hurt him, but thats a story for another time. Oh, the counsellor ended up being fine. And his name was Johnny Tapia.
post #115 of 123
I remembering watching the first UFC when I was heavily into martial arts when I was younger. Watched all of the early ones one right after they came out. It's weird seeing actually different styles go up against each other. Things stick in my head like that Sumo guy getting kicked in the face, or two karate guys going at it and not knowing what to do once they were on the ground. I really enjoyed martial arts, but then the action was taken out of it when Gracie and BJJ dominated early on. As an impressionable young man, it seemed like real fighting consisted of 90 minutes of hugging some guy on the ground.

Only recently did I get back into MMA and start watching again. I think it was a year or so ago when my friend showed me some clips from Pride that I realized that the sport has grown and matured and is now more exciting and well-rounded now. You can thank Kazushi Sakuraba for that and his innovate techniques. Now it seems like everyone has a ground game and striking ability and that in any MMA format, both of these are necessary. This makes the competition more of a sport and less of a freak show and it's gained a lot of respect (although there still are fights with Zuluzhino and Giant Silva versus guys significantly smaller than them which are freak shows).

K-1 is great and I love the action and the production quality. For my money, I'd watch K-1 Hero's or Pride or UFC though (Pride being my favorite). It seems well established that in combat sports, a good combination of wrestling, jiu-jitsu, and kickboxing should be involved.

I love how there are a lot more colorful characters these days in the sport too. One that comes to mind is Genki Sudo who has the most unorthodox fighting style (including spinning backfists, flying triangle chokes and arm bars, crazy dancing fighting). Watch him here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o28dPdaOeRQ

And who can forget El Guapo, Bas Rutten, the ambassador of all things MMA. Here is the best mma-related video clip I've ever seen.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LiEsktRiCXo

I'm going to be in Tokyo for the summer and hope to catch a show. Maybe a trip to the Saitama Super Arena or Osaka Dome? Woo!
post #116 of 123
Wow, I never realized that there was such interest in martial arts and fighting on this forum. I love watching the UFC and Pride (I like K-1 too, but K-1 is more kickboxing than MMA). I used to do a lot of martial arts when I was younger but then I got injured (herniated disks) so I stopped. Now, I still hit the weights pretty hard and do a lot of heavy bag and speed bag work, but I don't really train to fight.

Wouldn't mind getting in the ring and mixing it up with someone though.
post #117 of 123
Thread Starter 
Genki Sudo always has the weirdest freaking introductions to the ring. As for pride, my Japanese friend actually thinks that some matches are pre-determined, US wrestling style
post #118 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD
Genki Sudo always has the weirdest freaking introductions to the ring.

As for pride, my Japanese friend actually thinks that some matches are pre-determined, US wrestling style

There's actually good reasons why you're Japanese friend would think that. Much of the MMA in Japan grew from the Japanese Pro Wrestling circuits decades ago. The fighting circuit SHOOTO was actually started by a Pro Wrestler that wanted to create a hybrid form of pro wrestling that wasn't predetermined and depended on skill. Soon enough, this morphed into a straight MMA competition as any combat sport that allows you to wrestle and strike does. Many fighters with pro wrestling origins also matriculate to Pride or another MMA organization which might lead people confuse the two. Even Pride lightweight phenom Takanori Gomi started off as a pro wrestler.

However, just by watching Pride and having a knowledge martial arts, and also what Japanese fans want, I can tell you that Pride is not rigged. I have my doubts about K-1 sometimes though. By the way, the Japanese do not distinguish between the two, and K-1 is considered the generic term for combat sports over there being the most popular. There are freak injuries during Pride, people really getting knocked out, favorites being upset. Gomi recently was submitted and his Pride record now has one loss. Gomi was a huge favorite and everyone was stunned that he lost because he was the golden boy of Pride (their only Japanese champion). His marketability took a huge hit and Japanese fans who are very deferential to Japanese fighters were completely disappointed. Gomi even apologized to the fans after the match. If Pride had anything to say about who wins a fight, this would not have happened.

Lucky punches connect many times out of the blue to completely change the character of the match. Watching Pride often will convince you of it's authenticity. There's just no chance that it is. And if it is, it's faked so well that I'd consider them to be even greater athletes/actors to be able to so convincing. ESPN's sports guy in his recent article even made a mention of how Pride and UFC have become more legitimate competitions than Heavyweight boxing.

Every combat sport will inevitably be criticised as rigged. It's just inherent in the sport where one can imagine it would be easy to do so. As for Pride, though, if you would watch the Kazushi Sakuraba fight versus Wanderlei Silva (another situation in which Sak was a crowd favorite and lost not once not twice but three times) and see how badly beaten and bloodied he was, you would be a believer in the authenticity of Pride.
post #119 of 123
The only thing I really know about K-1 is that I met Bob Sapp once, and he's rather large.
post #120 of 123
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim
The only thing I really know about K-1 is that I met Bob Sapp once, and he's rather large.

Yea, but he got wtfpwned by Musashi.
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