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Fighters?

post #1 of 123
Thread Starter 
Serkan Yilmaz is my idol.

Do you guys watch K-1, UFC, or that kind of thing? I enjoy them all, but I think K-1 is the ultimate. Those guys are such amazing fighters. I love seeing Yilmaz counter-attack a punch with a spinning back roundhouse kick and hit first.

Baukaw is awesome too, but Yilmaz is so aggressive and takes so many risks and I love Tae Kwon Do style. It's a lot fancier than Muay Thai.

I'm working on my kickboxing, after years of Korean, Chinese, Japanese and Thai martial arts training. I think it's one of the few things you can do for your health that are really fun.
post #2 of 123
My brother is really into UFC, Pride, etc. We have been watching it ever since the UFC first started, which is when I enjoyed it. I thought the whole concept of UFC was really cool...people of differing martial arts schools/types going at it to prove which one was best...karate vs. boxing...jiujitsu vs. whatever, etc. At that time jiujitsu was the best, Royce Gracey was kicking everyone's ass. Now though, it is kinda boring because it looks like all the fighters are using the same style of fighting. Of course that was bound to happen, the newer guys learning what works and what doesn't, but I thought it was much more enjoyable to watch when the two fighters used completly different styles. It was wild. Also, they have a lot of rules now (which they didn't before) like no hair pulling, groin kicking and whatnot, I guess to make the 'sport' more socially acceptable. Again, I thought it was better before they tried to make it a 'sport' and would let Joe Jerkoff, who has had no training, into the octagon just so he can run up to the other guy and just start swingin'
post #3 of 123
I did AAU/Golden Gloves for a while, and boxed a couple of years in the army. This kind of stuff is hard on the head, even with head gear. I still follow the fights somewhat, but not with as much passion. Later in life I took up Kuk Sool Won and am a 1st Dan. It's more benign than boxing, and less hard on the head.

The UFC stuff in interesting, and I do find the Gracie methods fascinating. I am wonder what the long-term effects on the fighters will be.

M8
post #4 of 123
Thread Starter 
Ask anyone who has been involved with fight training and they'll tell you that the training is where injuries happen - not the ring. I like the concept of original UFC (Joe Schmoe get in the octagon and start flailing), but I think K-1 has far superior competitors. There's always the classic argument of, "Can a little fast guy beat a big fat guy?" I'm pretty sure Gracie just lost to a big fat hawaiian guy last week, but he was doing the wrong things. Rushing in for body blows on a guy whose like 300 + pounds isn't going to bring him down, no? I think they should concentrate on pummeling his legs and face with low kicks and fast sidestep kicking. And I agree a lot of people in UFC kind of stick to the same style, which is partly why I'm a little bored with it. It seems like it's all traditional kickboxing, with a little Muay Thai, and then some Judo or Jiu Jitsu for ground fighting. What I find most interesting is that elbows are not prohibited in UFC, considering that it is the hardest part of the body and can easily cause bleeding which may force the fight to stop.
post #5 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martinis at 8
. Later in life I took up Kuk Sool Won and am a 1st Dan. M8

M8 - how does that compare with haipkido?
post #6 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
M8 - how does that compare with haipkido?
Pretty much the same thing, except for the hyung (forms). Think hapkido with a trademark name. M8 BTW, did you come across with Krav Maga training in the IDF?
post #7 of 123
I could be mistaken Brian, but I think elbows are not allowed anymore. Anyway, I don't watch it anymore partly because everyone having the same style is kind of boring, but I also don't really get off to seeing people get hurt anymore. Looks like I'm going soft btw all this fighting is academic to me, I've never been in one myself.
post #8 of 123
Thread Starter 
I've never been in a fight that wasn't an official one, per se. I've had lots of sparring matches without gloves and foot guards and helmuts, but never a streetfight. I am interested only in the physical conditioning of it, and the sheer fun involved in fighting.
post #9 of 123
yeah i fought for a long time too. i started with a very tame form of Wing Chun when I was at UCLA, went back to Australia and did a very very street style of Wing Chun. Changed cities and took up kickboxing, used to fight competitively in Melbourne, also had one boxing match. In Singapore I always boxed under a really good teacher - the only Singaporean ever to win a Commonwealth Games medal for boxing. I also trained no holds barred with the SMARS guys (now defunct), but that was a little too tough for me - after about the third time I went in to the office with a black eye I figured 'maybe better to give this up'. At random times I have trained in judo and a little BJJ. I really want to get back into it, but not sure what I will do. Im getting fat and lazy, but having had an operation about 6 weeks ago, with a wound that is still occassionally a little bit tender, it will probably be at least another month before I can take on any exercise. There is a French guy here who runs a NHB school, he fights 3 or 4 times a year in Japan in the competition one below Pride. He is expensive though (about $120 a month, which is a real lot for here). I looked into boxing and various other striking arts, but for some reason they all train twice a day, at 6 am (which doesnt exist for me) or at 4 pm (when I am at work). May go back to judo, I like the grappling, and I doubt Ill find anything else here. Vietnam has a very good reputation in freestyle wrestling, but all the wrestling clubs are up in Hanoi, which rules that out. Plus - as with anything - big language barriers between me and teachers....
post #10 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martinis at 8
Pretty much the same thing, except for the hyung (forms). Think hapkido with a trademark name.

M8

BTW, did you come across with Krav Maga training in the IDF?

yeah, but, as you probrably know, for the most part if you are hitting somebody with an empty fist in the army, you have seriously fucked up somewhere.

I actually studied krav at the "shaolin temple" of krav - at wingate, the base were it was developed. the unit I was with was on call part of the month as a swat team for one of the large metros in israel, so I had anti-terror training, which was basically krav and pistol work. and, I had the extreme misfortune to be in the army during the first intafadah - so I spent a good chunk of time with a night stick.

I like krav - it is very no nonsense, and it works for different body types.
post #11 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by m@T
yeah i fought for a long time too.

i started with a very tame form of Wing Chun when I was at UCLA, went back to Australia and did a very very street style of Wing Chun.

Changed cities and took up kickboxing, used to fight competitively in Melbourne, also had one boxing match.

In Singapore I always boxed under a really good teacher - the only Singaporean ever to win a Commonwealth Games medal for boxing. I also trained no holds barred with the SMARS guys (now defunct), but that was a little too tough for me - after about the third time I went in to the office with a black eye I figured 'maybe better to give this up'.

At random times I have trained in judo and a little BJJ.

I really want to get back into it, but not sure what I will do. Im getting fat and lazy, but having had an operation about 6 weeks ago, with a wound that is still occassionally a little bit tender, it will probably be at least another month before I can take on any exercise.

There is a French guy here who runs a NHB school, he fights 3 or 4 times a year in Japan in the competition one below Pride. He is expensive though (about $120 a month, which is a real lot for here).

I looked into boxing and various other striking arts, but for some reason they all train twice a day, at 6 am (which doesnt exist for me) or at 4 pm (when I am at work).

May go back to judo, I like the grappling, and I doubt Ill find anything else here. Vietnam has a very good reputation in freestyle wrestling, but all the wrestling clubs are up in Hanoi, which rules that out.

Plus - as with anything - big language barriers between me and teachers....

can't you get somebody to come by and give you a private lesson when you want there? I would think that it wouldn't be that expensive.


I have been going to a Mcdojo since I moved to the states, basically because it gives me accesss to a bunch of young sparing partners. when I get settled into a new job, I want to find a really good school - what I would like would be either to get back to krav, or maybe silat, which looks like a good fit for me.
post #12 of 123
yeah your own point 2 sort of explains why I dont take you up on point 1. private teachers are limiting because you only get to train with that one guy, so it gets predictable. i like the variety from a club that will give me, as you put it, "a variety of young sparring partners". Keeps you fresh, keeps you thinking...
post #13 of 123
point taken
post #14 of 123
I fight dirty, ya'll don't want none of this.
post #15 of 123
I trained on and off for about 5 years in high school and some of college in Northern Shaolin Longfist. Then I got interested in the whole NHB thing same time as everyone else, so trained in BJJ (Machado) and supplemented with some boxing. Continued some training in traditional Chinese styles, and took some Tang So Do and Kenpo Karate classes - essentially became a martial arts dilletante. Discovered that despite being naturally aggressive, that my " block with face" technique was not as effective as hoped, and have not been training much since. I am the shame of all my teachers
Did learn how to use a machete pretty effectively though, somewhere along the way.

Oh, and Tokyo, I also fight dirty. In fact, a lot of Shaolin longfist forms are kind of dirty fighting. There is one form where essentially, you simulate grabbing a mans nutsack, twisting, and slamming the back of your strong hand into it. Never tried that in real life. But I would.
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