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On the Street in NYC....Trad or Thom Browne? - Page 2

post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02
There’s just no evidence that the large majority of Americans had any interest in yellow pants with ducks or madras jackets.
The most interesting part of your post, to my mind, is the part I'm neglecting to respond to or cite. Because it takes more thought than I want to give to it at this hour. But, two things: I think those go-to-hell pants have always been in the minority, even among trads. Second: I wonder if the madras jacket wasn't a lot more popular than you suggest. I don't think, in the 50's, that it was simply an Ivy League or Trad thing. Just my guess.
post #17 of 27
Horace--you're probably right on the numbers that wore the Ivy League style. The '50s seem to be the time that the ivy league became The Ivy League, primarily differentiating themselves from the riff-raff of new unis popping up around the country (/exaggeration) by refusing to sacrifice academic standards in order to lure athletes (1945, first Ivy Group Agreement). This also seems to be why I was relegated to watching Crew and Squash instead of top notch football

Ivy League style pushing into Miles' closet, among others--yes, I agree, and much of the result can be seen in the thread I linked. Rockers and hep cats exaggerated cuts and colors, which is now a certain designer's preferred source of inspiration. When the look moved to England it was completely integrated by the youthful Mod movement--GS probably has pics, I'll try to get a screenshot from Blow-Up. By then the worn-in, shabby quality was dropped and there was enough of a change to give the look a new name.

The Seeley G. Mudd library at Princeton has a phenomenal collection of historical photographs. I'll see if I can post any from the '30s-'60s. Looking forward to your thoughts on the "whys" when you have a chance.

Tom
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02
Ivy League style pushing into Miles' closet, among others--yes, I agree, and much of the result can be seen in the thread I linked. When the look moved to England it was completely integrated by the youthful Mod movement
Tom

I used to wear Ivy league style clothing in London back in the early 1960's. I had stuff like madras jackets, Arrow and Gant BD shirts, knitted ties, that sort of thing.......


borace
post #19 of 27
yep, the original mods from the late 50s, prior to it being commercialized by 1965, were very much influenced by Ivy League American wear, as well as Italian "continental" fashion, usually mixing the two into its own look.
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Get Smart
yep, the original mods from the late 50s, prior to it being commercialized by 1965, were very much influenced by Ivy League American wear, as well as Italian "continental" fashion, usually mixing the two into its own look.

I was a mod till around the end of 1964, still wear some ivy league clothing these days, it's been a very enduring style.

btw I like your Thom Browne suit.
post #21 of 27
thanks, I just saw your comment and was going to remark it's nice you can tell "where I am coming from". btw, very cool that you were one of the 'originals'. the definition and *rules* of "mod" has sure evolved over the years
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02
OK. So what?

I can only write for myself on this one.
The picture you posted is not representative the clothing worn by most Americans. It simply represents the abject state of poverty of the families of small farmers of Alabama. The entire collection of the Evans photos is not intended to be a cross section of American life or dress. The purpose of the project was to chronicle only the poverty stricken population.

Sure, those were real people, no denying that. However, posting a picture such as that one, and claiming that it represented the common standard of dress is simply misleading. And, although I cannot prove it, my guess is that the family would have known more about what was proper dress - if the could have afforded to buy it - than today's impovershed know. Particularly since those who are moderately wealthy demonstrate that a T-shirt decorated with foul language is acceptable.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charley
Particularly since those who are moderately wealthy demonstrate that a T-shirt decorated with foul language is acceptable.
So T shirts that say "Shit" are more representative of American style today than poor farmers were during the Great Depression? I hereby admit that I displayed an extreme example to prove a point--the '30s were, economically, the worst period of American history, and that fact was reflected in the dress of the times. I would like to be proven wrong. Until then, I maintain that the idea of '30s style has more of an influence on modern dress than actual '30s style does.

edit--it's a shame Horace acted like a dumbass before he could reply again.

Tom
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02
edit--it's a shame Horace acted like a dumbass before he could reply again.

Tom

I don't know if I'm out of line here, but about halfway down this thread may be of interest to you and also to Get Smart and Charley:


http://www.filmnoirbuff.com/forum/vi...php?id=173&p=1
post #25 of 27
Nice name, and some nice info. Thanks. "My name is T-Rad! Tradly is my African slave name."
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by tradlybradley
I don't know if I'm out of line here, but about halfway down this thread may be of interest to you and also to Get Smart and Charley:


http://www.filmnoirbuff.com/forum/vi...php?id=173&p=1

nice references. For a minute there I thought I was reading posts from my mod forum. The 50s-mid 60s "jazz trad" is something that I've always incorporated in my wardrobe, but the way "trad" is used/referred to by AAAC posters is something that I can't relate to at all. There's a fine line between trad being "youthful and hepcat-hip" and it being stodgy old geezer style. The line is fine, but it's there.
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by tradlybradley
I don't know if I'm out of line here, but about halfway down this thread may be of interest to you and also to Get Smart and Charley:


http://www.filmnoirbuff.com/forum/vi...php?id=173&p=1
Thanks for the heads-up. It's a tough call, but I think this is the best comment: "Ah the Talented Mr. Ripley, where Trad meets Neapolitan." Well said, FNB. When all the fauxld-money regressive BS isn't incorporated into this need for Trad assimilation, it can sound almost...cool

Tom
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