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Your feelings about inside temperatures in the US - Page 3

post #31 of 33
When I lived in Houston, I would always be freezing indoors. It would actually feel nice to walk out of a restaurant and get into a car that had been baking for 2 hours in 90 degree heat with 80% humidity!

It's always seemed to me that 60 A/C is a lot more chlling than a true 60 degree day, but I have no explanation for why that should be true.

Boston isn't so bad, but I find academic buildings to generally be overheated in the winter and overcooled in the summer.
post #32 of 33
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jen
When I lived in Houston, I would always be freezing indoors. It would actually feel nice to walk out of a restaurant and get into a car that had been baking for 2 hours in 90 degree heat with 80% humidity!

It's always seemed to me that 60 A/C is a lot more chlling than a true 60 degree day, but I have no explanation for why that should be true.

Boston isn't so bad, but I find academic buildings to generally be overheated in the winter and overcooled in the summer.

Same feelings exactly on all points, except that the last university I frequented did not have enough funds to air-condition all of the professors' offices, and most installed illegal window units.

Edit: "not enough funds to air-condition the offices of professors in the humanities"
post #33 of 33
I was once told for engineering purposes, its more efficient for larger buildings with central air conditioning to keep the temperature at a lower point for humidity purposes. Given my rudimentary knowledge of condensor mechanics, I find the reasoning plausible though I cannot confirm its veracity. Otherwise, bring a sweater.
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