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Shoes: Who makes what for whom. - Page 4

post #46 of 108
Kiton: shoeworks established by Meccariello (a Neapolitan RTW/Bespoke maker)
post #47 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by T4phage
Kiton: shoeworks established by Meccariello (a Neapolitan RTW/Bespoke maker)

Hmmm, I'd been wondering about these since I saw them at Louis Boston. How much do these go for across the pond? They surely can't be as expensive as in the States, where they retail for about $2000!
post #48 of 108
IIRC, they are about 1k EU. They are more expensive than others that are much, much nicer and also made in Naples.
post #49 of 108
Doesn't Kiton have it's on inhouse shoe making setup? There was a recent posting of someone that had toured it.
post #50 of 108
Guidi (formerly Guidi & Rosselini) is one of the best leather tanneries left in Tuscany. They have done work for Poell and Carpe Diem. There are in the process of revamping, so nothing on their website yet.
post #51 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy
Hmmm, I'd been wondering about these since I saw them at Louis Boston. How much do these go for across the pond? They surely can't be as expensive as in the States, where they retail for about $2000!
Iammatt is correct, the shoes average about Euro 1000, and if you want the MTO option (where you can choose the colour of the leather, and to some extent the last and pattern) is an extra 10%. There are some cheaper models though that cost about Euro 400 such as the rubber soled suede chukka.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kitonbrioni
Doesn't Kiton have it's on inhouse shoe making setup? There was a recent posting of someone that had toured it.
Yes they do, and Mecarriello set it up. After he had trained the workers and set up the programme he was let go.....
post #52 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by T4phage
Iammatt is correct, the shoes average about Euro 1000, and if you want the MTO option (where you can choose the colour of the leather, and to some extent the last and pattern) is an extra 10%. There are some cheaper models though that cost about Euro 400 such as the rubber soled suede chukka.
T4 any idea in Rome where you can pick up a pair?

Quote:
Yes they do, and Mecarriello set it up. After he had trained the workers and set up the programme he was let go.....
Jeez that sounds rough...
post #53 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by whnay.
T4 any idea in Rome where you can pick up a pair?
Sorry, I can't help you there. But one of stores on Condotti/F.Borgese or a offshoot will most likely carry it.
post #54 of 108
Quote:
After he had trained the workers and set up the programme he was let go.....

Huh, I didn't know this! I had always assumed that Mecarriello had just moved into the Kiton facility and ceased to exist as an independant company... It's good to know that they are still around.
post #55 of 108
If I remember correctly, I think Meccariello makes shoes for Rubinacci clients as well.
post #56 of 108
Thread Starter 
Add Barneys to the list of Edward Green list of former clients. I don't recall ever seeing EG at Barneys so I was surprised when I came across the Dover II made for Barneys:







Can anyone date the shoes from the serial number? I'd think they're from early 90's? I much prefer Dover's more intricate apron stitchings.
post #57 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Get Smart
London level shoes are "handmade" in India, the mainline and PS shoes are made in Italy.

I would strongly recommend avoiding the Indian-made Paul Smith shoes - I have a pair of three-eyelet Oxfords which have split in two places along creases clean through the leather, and the rest of the uppers are horribly cracked and worn (they've been re-soled only once). The uppers have also split open along the line of the sole on the inside of the foot.

I'm not heavy on shoes, and they've always been polished regularly - for similar money, Jeffery West have worn far better for me.
post #58 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by von Rothbart
Can anyone date the shoes from the serial number? I'd think they're from early 90's? I much prefer Dover's more intricate apron stitchings.

I have no information on the date of those shoes, but prefer the apron detail on my EG Dovers. Very nice shoes and comfy too. In an attempt to reduce the amount of luggage on my recent trip to NYC I took only one pair of shoes - the Dovers that I wore every day. They were extremely comfortable and held up very well with just a light cleaning with tissue paper each day and being put into plastic shoe trees overnight.
post #59 of 108
They are probably from the late 80s when Edward Green shared a bed (oops, factory) with John Lobb/Hermès.

The shoes are called "Dover II" which might refer to the different type of apron-stitching. (I can't see from the pictures whether the apron is hand- or machine sewn, the toe seam is definitely done by machine). I believe in the old days, EG had another Dover-variation, one with a shorter apron and a longer nose.
post #60 of 108
I see these Barney's EGs pop-up time-to-time on a Japanese auction site. Never come across these in person.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe
The shoes are called "Dover II" which might refer to the different type of apron-stitching.
It probably also refers to the seam going through the side.
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