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Modern Tailor.com review - my experience - Page 9

post #121 of 680
Quote:
Originally Posted by columbia92 View Post
I think we tend to forget that moderntailor.com don't really make any fabrics. They are just a company that does tailoring. As such, I think we rely on them to pick good quality fabrics but have as wide range of selections of pattern and price point as possible to satisfy the need of all customers. I think we can suggest to them what fabrics we're looking for to help to guide them to stock more of the fabrics we want.

That is true - and that's why I wished for them to add those tattersall fabrics to their selection. I've also told them that via email when ordering a shirt, so I'm not relying on their forum activity.

It'd be really nice to see some more casual/weekend fabrics in their selection. A white, thick and reasonably priced white oxford is an another staple fabric that would be nice to see there.

So far, they have a good concept and high potential to become my primary shirt provider.
post #122 of 680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jussi View Post
Hello, everyone! I'm a new forum member and thought that this, probably, might be a good way to "introduce" myself (mostly my addiction to perfect fit) and to share something I've pondered a bit about. Some of you have wondered about sizing. I've done a bit of tailoring (a hobby, rather serious one in times - I used to study it for a longer while) and adjust rather much everything except suits and odd jackets, if they need a little bit of touchup. [... interesting things to be read ...]
I quote your very good post because i think it can be very helpful. I've noticed this particularly :
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jussi View Post
Waist is all about your tastes. You need some extra room to breath and sit, but, unless you're a real fan of lunch hours, this shouldn't be excessive. Sit and measure yourself, take a snug (but not too snug) fit, take a same measurement when standing up. Think about these. I generally go by first fit.
Can be useful. Jussi, you can correct me but i think that people must notice that these interesting measurement tips are for a Slim Fit shirt, that is to say the tailor must not add too much room and must apply them to the final shirt exactly as specified. This is important with WebTailors because - generally - as they have not measured you in real world they can consider that measurement you provide is to be adjusted to prevent the shirt to be too slim (they add some extra room - less risky). And the result can be different from expected.
post #123 of 680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Syb View Post
Jussi, you can correct me but i think that people must notice that these interesting measurement tips are for a Slim Fit shirt, that is to say the tailor must not add too much room and must apply them to the final shirt exactly as specified.

This is important with WebTailors because - generally - as they have not measured you in real world they can consider that measurement you provide is to be adjusted to prevent the shirt to be too slim (they add some extra room - less risky). And the result can be different from expected.

Definitely. The guide was made for putting in the exact, final measurements for "copy my shirt measurements" -type of service. Usually, different "measure your body and we'll add some room" -services give very varied results - and are mostly erred towards the large side.


I've noticed (and this is my personal view) that when one's sitting down, the stomach is pretty much as relaxed as possible (thus, has the largest circumference). There's some give in buttonholes & closure for that (and human body isn't actually rigid on that area), so the "skin tight" measurement actually does. For me, it's about standing measurement + 4cm (I have a flat stomach - well, now some ~5kg's of extra winterweight but I shall shed it soon). Waist measurement is definitely up to one's tastes. However, if one wants to avoid bunching and sloppy trousers-to-shirt -transition, this measurement has to be relatively tight.

As said earlier, the guide gives you a rather slim fitting shirt. When adjusting different fits, it's necessary to understand the basics of how the shirt works. For example, I would never take the shoulder seam further than 1,5cm out from the end of the collarbone - having it sit right at the end of the bone is best (when considering the ability to move). Armhole is a similar thing - I don't want excess room there, thus just 1cm for fabric to drape well and avoid any uncomfortability (is that a word?). It's all about movement - if one wishes to avoid his shirt pulling out from his trousers (this, actually, doesn't have anything to do with the length of the shirt tail. As long as it's 4" in your pants, a properly measured shirt won't pull) and have a free movement for his arms, he wants the shoulder and armhole fit to be exact. Same thing as with suits and high armholes (and even the best high armhole won't help, if suits shoulders are too wide - and it looks ridiculous as well).

Room for shoulder movement (front to back, up and down) is made with armpit-to-armpit -allowance. Back pleats give some extra here, but, according to fashion nowadays (yes, fashion), doesn't look good. Thus, I recommend those to be used only if one's sure that he stays jacketed all the time. Other "jacket only" things (although very dapper when unjacketed) are slightly roomier sleeves, 2-4cm of extra length to sleeves, tight-ish cuffs and sleeve bands (I hope this is a correct term in English - however, I'm meaning the bands around upper bicep area to rise the sleeve a bit).

The "problem" with shirts (and suits, for that matter, although wool can be stretched and suppressed a bit to create shapes) is that they're generally done from two dimensional material that is turned into a three dimensional object. Thus, different things - seams, darts, pleats - are used to create an approximation of the body. Some room has to be left in critical places, since cotton doesn't stretch and live like human skin does.

One thing that I always, always heavily despise is the claim that extra room means extra mobility. This simply isn't true. Make the armholes too big and drop the shoulder seams and a result is a sack that you can't lift your arms without dragging the shirt out of your trousers and ripping the armpit seam. So, even with more relaxed fit, these things have to be kept in mind.

(Sorry about the length of this post. I might have babbled a bit...)
post #124 of 680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Syb View Post
I quote your very good post because i think it can be very helpful. I've noticed this particularly :



Can be useful.

Jussi, you can correct me but i think that people must notice that these interesting measurement tips are for a Slim Fit shirt, that is to say the tailor must not add too much room and must apply them to the final shirt exactly as specified.

This is important with WebTailors because - generally - as they have not measured you in real world they can consider that measurement you provide is to be adjusted to prevent the shirt to be too slim (they add some extra room - less risky). And the result can be different from expected.

Moderntailor made my shirt to the exact measurements I provided them from a shirt I already own. They didn't add any "room"
post #125 of 680
Quote:
Originally Posted by imwithtuxedo View Post
Moderntailor made my shirt to the exact measurements I provided them from a shirt I already own. They didn't add any "room"

They did it with me. They added 3cm on sleeves width (half biceps) because the tailor considered that half biceps measurement was not coherent with collar measurement... And I always used "measurement from a shirt".

Unfortunately this order was for quite a lot of shirts...

But fortunately their after sale service is excellent.
post #126 of 680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Syb View Post
Unfortunately this order was for quite a lot of shirts...

But fortunately their after sale service is excellent.

This is why I love modern tailor. They process order very quickly and when and if there is any issue, they have incredible customer service to resolve your issues and keep you happy. :-D
post #127 of 680
Woah, talk about fast! I ordered my second shirt on the 23rd at night and just received shipping confirmation. That's practically two days! They seem to really want to please us SFites.
post #128 of 680
Yes. They have excellent customer service. I always get an answer within a day. They have a weekly sale. $20 off coupons. Etc, etc. Can't exactly find anything wrong with their craftsmanship either. Although their buttons are plastic and their MOP are thin *hint* (we want thicker and bigger MOP buttons) . Not a big problem as I can just switch them out for cheap. Had some issues with one measurement. Guess they took off an inch or what not. They're making me another shirt.
post #129 of 680
i notice they just added more info on the fabric itself like how think the fabric is...
post #130 of 680
Quote:
Originally Posted by columbia92 View Post
i notice they just added more info on the fabric itself like how think the fabric is...

I wish they would actually tell us how many plies the fabrics are...
post #131 of 680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jussi View Post
Hello, everyone!
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[indent]My own preferred (slim) fit (I give these straight to "measure your shirt" -fields to be copied as well as ever possible):
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I hope this helps someone.

I have been lurking around here for the last couple of days trying to find out everything I can about online MTM shirts.
Everyone seems to go with "copy your own well fitting shirt" rather than "measure your own body", but since I don't have a shirt that fits well in all the right places I am inclined to go for the measure your own body option and get everything just right.

However, Moderntailor say they will add 12cm to your chest, waist and hips for a slim fit shirt which I feel might be a bit loose for my taste so I am interested in your slim fit measurements.

Do you have a picture of a shirt of these measurements being worn?
post #132 of 680
Quote:
Originally Posted by jippm View Post
However, Moderntailor say they will add 12cm to your chest, waist and hips for a slim fit shirt which I feel might be a bit loose for my taste so I am interested in your slim fit measurements.

I would get the shirt that best fits you and add or subtract a few centimeters based on your own judgment, I mean you current shirts can't be too far from well fitting, right?
post #133 of 680
Quote:
Originally Posted by jobro View Post
I would get the shirt that best fits you and add or subtract a few centimeters based on your own judgment, I mean you current shirts can't be too far from well fitting, right?

You are quite right. I am very happy with the chest, waist and hips on my favourite shirt ( $2 from an op-shop!), however, it has a 35cm neck whereas I am more a 37cm so the top button can't be done up, the sleeves are far too short so I always wear them rolled up and it is too short to be tucked in! I could measure it and add to the neck, sleeves and overall length (plus maybe some shoulder) but I do like the idea of starting from scratch.

I have been able to get away with the appalling fit up until now because I have never really needed a shirt for anything formal so I could wear it casually. However, I now need shirts for work/study and since I have lifetime of shirts ahead of me I want to consider all my options now.

Cheers
post #134 of 680
Quote:
Originally Posted by jippm View Post
You are quite right. I am very happy with the chest, waist and hips on my favourite shirt ( $2 from an op-shop!), however, it has a 35cm neck whereas I am more a 37cm so the top button can't be done up, the sleeves are far too short so I always wear them rolled up and it is too short to be tucked in! I could measure it and add to the neck, sleeves and overall length (plus maybe some shoulder) but I do like the idea of starting from scratch.

I have been able to get away with the appalling fit up until now because I have never really needed a shirt for anything formal so I could wear it casually. However, I now need shirts for work/study and since I have lifetime of shirts ahead of me I want to consider all my options now.

Cheers

There is a big difference between a Webtailor and a good local bespoke shirtmaker. With a local shirtmaker, you should have a first meeting to measure you on body, let him know your tastes, choose your fabric, options, etc. Then a second meeting to try the shirt on and see where to make adjustments. The tailor can see the result on your body and appreciate what is to be modified. Then a third meeting to try the shirt on a second time after adjustments have been made. Generally it is OK at this step but you could need one or two meetings more to reach the exact requirements.

With a webshirtmaker, you'll never see the tailor (and he will never see you). It won't be easy to return the shirt to the tailor by mail for alterations even if possible.

In this case I think the quicker way to reach the best result is really the "Measure On Shirt that best fits"option and correct the measurement where needed. There's chance for not being excellent right from the first time but it will be a good beginning point. And your first shirt should be wearable even if not perfect.
post #135 of 680
Yes, chances are the shirt measured from your best fitting shirt and adjusted by your own judgment will fit a lot better than one that is made from body measurements where there is more room for error.
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