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What are the most durable suit fabrics? - Page 4

post #46 of 56
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Originally Posted by usctrojans31 View Post


You either die banned, or live long enough to see yourself become dubiously honored.
post #47 of 56
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Originally Posted by vida View Post

notice how many people posting in this thread are BANNED! Hilarious...
Good old days of SF. Now there are so many repititious and needlessly fawning posts and threads. I mean how many times can you post pictures of your Dovers or Galways AND get the same inane congratulatory replies.
post #48 of 56
Yesssss.
But what about the fabriccs?
Every iGent wanting (to post pics of his) super light-weight, super soft spalla camicias is all fine and dandy but I'm just looking for a suit (fabric) that will last me ages and not blow out at the fork after ten wears.
Been looking around but can't seem to find a guide on weave types and their respective durabilities. Maybe its not as much down to the weave as it is to the mill? I dunno.

Fwiw I have found my winter-weight mohair mix to wear the best so far.
post #49 of 56
Not a guide to relative to durability, but this is a handy visual key to fabric weaves and designs.

The other good place to start is the discussion of weaves' properties in Villarosa and Angeli's The Elegant Man: How to Construct the Ideal Wardrobe (1992). Lots of color photographs of weaves and designs, with helpful discussion of their wear properties.

It seems like you know the basics--all else equal, suiting twills like serge or pick-and pick are generally tougher than plain weaves, cavalry twills or whipcords generally tougher than serge or pick-and-pick, heavier fabrics generally tougher than lighter, 3x3 is generally tougher than 2x2 which is generally tougher than 2x1 . Beyond that, it comes down a lot of inter-related factors--what kind of yarn was used, how much it was twisted, how did they weave it, is it tight woven, how did they finish it.

Just to show how much durability is down to a wide variety of factors, there are now plenty of super light, super high Super cloths (i.e. very fine yarns) on the market that wear hard. JeffreyD had a post on a 20 year old Super 150s that had held up well.
Edited by Testudo_Aubreii - 7/13/16 at 12:17pm
post #50 of 56
Ha, that post on the old S150 is one I know well; it is a good one showing that conventional knowledge is not always true. I myself have a S150 which seems to be holding up better than mant loosely woven S120's I've had.
It is a shame though, as a consumer, that there is not really a way for me to determine whether or not the fabric I am buying will wear well.

What are your thoughts on Dormeuil's Tonik 2000 (Mohair mix) or Smith's Steadfast?

http://www.dormeuil.com/en/cloth-collection/detailed-collection/best-sellers/mohairs/
http://www.harrisonsofedinburgh.com/collections/smith-woollens/steadfast
post #51 of 56
By "wear well," do you mean "hold up against fraying or tearing for a long time"? Or do you mean "keep a nice tailored shape for a long time?" I thought you were talking about the former--a fabric's resistance to fraying, tearing, or other or other damage. But the last post seems to be talking about a fabric's taking nicely to a tailor's shaping and then keeping that shape.

I don't have experience with either Tonik or Steadfast, but tailors and experienced bespoke customers both say that both of those books perform very well in taking and keeping a shape. There is a reason why tailors love working with mohair--its crimp and elasticity give it excellent shape retention.

For more on elasticity and other properties that lead to a cloth's wearing well in this broad sense, check out this interview with Dougal Munro of H&S.

Also worth checking out the Warp and Woof subforum on Cutter & Tailor.
post #52 of 56
Thanks, I meant the former. Don't like holes in my trousers after 10 wears.
post #53 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crat View Post

Thanks, I meant the former. Don't like holes in my trousers after 10 wears.

Got it. I'd be astounded if you got holes in the trouser seat after 10 wears with either of those books. The hopsacks in the Steadfast book probably won't be as tough as the twill weaves, and hopsack can catch on splinters or nails, but Smiths' worsteds and Dormeuil's mohairs are tough cloths.

Serendipitously, I just this hour received a length of Huddersfield Cloth's 70/30 wool/mohair 13 oz cloth from the Scissett book. That's the same blend and almost the same weight as Dormeuil's Tonik 2000s. Despite being a plain weave, it feels hard. That's probably down to the mohair fibers and their using a two-ply weave. I don't think this cloth will be fraying or tearing anytime soon.
post #54 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crat View Post

Ha, that post on the old S150 is one I know well; it is a good one showing that conventional knowledge is not always true. I myself have a S150 which seems to be holding up better than mant loosely woven S120's I've had.
It is a shame though, as a consumer, that there is not really a way for me to determine whether or not the fabric I am buying will wear well.

What are your thoughts on Dormeuil's Tonik 2000 (Mohair mix) or Smith's Steadfast?

http://www.dormeuil.com/en/cloth-collection/detailed-collection/best-sellers/mohairs/
http://www.harrisonsofedinburgh.com/collections/smith-woollens/steadfast

Tonik is solid enough I have several but despite its "solid" construction I would not characterize it as a particularly durable cloth. H lesser 16 oz is very, very durable the 12 oz less so but it's definitely the cloth favored by Savile Row tailors when they make a suit expected to last 10 years. I would say if you do the 16 oz in two suits with two pairs of trousers each and if you could stand the weight you could wear those two suits for a good 10 years. I even knew a tailor who did just that, one navy one charcoal.
post #55 of 56
Glad to have someone with David's experience chime in. David, for those who can't afford the price of Lesser 16oz, what would you recommend as a highly durable alternative? Do you have experience with Smith's Steadfast or Botany books? Or Dugdale English Classics?

Sator had one of the clearest discussions I've found of the difference that the ply of the yarns makes to durability. Cloth with 2 ply yarns in both warp and weft is generally more durable than cloth with 2ply in warp and 1ply in weft. Cloth with 3 ply yarns is more durable than cloth with 2 ply, etc.
post #56 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Testudo_Aubreii View Post

Glad to have someone with David's experience chime in. David, for those who can't afford the price of Lesser 16oz, what would you recommend as a highly durable alternative? Do you have experience with Smith's Steadfast or Botany books? Or Dugdale English Classics?

Sator had one of the clearest discussions I've found of the difference that the ply of the yarns makes to durability. Cloth with 2 ply yarns in both warp and weft is generally more durable than cloth with 2ply in warp and 1ply in weft. Cloth with 3 ply yarns is more durable than cloth with 2 ply, etc.

I would just really try to afford that cloth over the others mentioned. I have worn Dugdale and found it to be the worst of both worlds, feels like a durable cloth (not in a good way) and it wore out really fast and I am light on suits. I have no real experience with the others but for what you are getting I would just do the Lesser. I think the difference comes down to many factors but ultimately its the performance, the quality control and the construction you pay for which you may not see immediately but you will appreciate down the road.
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