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What are the most durable suit fabrics? - Page 3

post #31 of 56
Surprised no one's mentioned Fresco yet. To my novice eyes and touch it seems pretty durable.
post #32 of 56
he asked what is the most durable.

not what is pretty durable.
post #33 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
You asked if anyone ever had problems with a super worsted wearing out. I did. It came out of a swatch book at Oxxford, so I assume it was not a cheap or low-end cloth. It is the only cloth I've had trouble with--regardless of the suit's maker. After four or five wearings, pulls began appearing.

fair enough.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sho'nuff View Post
he asked what is the most durable.

not what is pretty durable.

steel. an armor suit is quite durable.
post #34 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
I don't want to turn this into a LP criminal defense trial as I really don't care. LP is a huge company that makes a ton of cloth in various quality levels. You can find their stuff from crappy JCrew clothing (chinese cashmere) to uber expensive stuff.
I know that the NYC custom set love Loro Piana fabric and Luciano Barberis; they also love 7-8oz cloths. Partly it's the finish, partly it is the softness which comes about because the cloths are 2x1 weaves. The English weave sturdier summer fabrics but they're not as light. Also, most of the men who I have observed buy custom suits don't care if the suits last more than a few years. To make a comparison, shirt fabrics in 140s-220s seem to be the favorites around the forums. No way those last as long as a good 100s but people dont seem to care. Which means the set that prefer the heavier stuff here constitute a fringe confederacy. Most cloths are going to look good new, some of the lighter ones will look tired after extended use. However, this is a complex subject. If people want 16oz suits, let them have them but it isnt that theyre buying 16oz suits, it's their need to declare that it's a superior choice and that lighter fabrics are like tissue paper. This rationalization on their part I find dishonest, espceially if they havent had first hand "taste tests" between various fabrics. Again, a lot of the performance revolves around construction and ultimately provenance. When you buy Lesser or Harrisons cloth, you know you're getting good, solid stuff. When you dig around at a bargain basement jobber, who knows where the cloth really came from? And if it's a Chinese knock off labeled super 150s and it falls apart, it's no ones fault but the buyer's. The super 150s from HArrisons are more solid that most merchant 100s. Personally, I think some of the heavier fabrics do look better not only because most tailors are uncomfortable with the lighter fabrics but also because they drape better and possess more physical/optical depth. Now, If you are a dilettante who puts a suit on for a couple hours a day, maybe it doesn't matter. if you have an actual work day that entails all the things I have come to expect in the tri state area, then the heavier cloths get uncomfortable. At some point you can't wear a suit merely because it looks better or it's the "right" thing to wear, no at some point you have to wear a suit you feel comfortable in. I wont go o far to say that all men who choose heavier fabrics are fringe but many who crow about it on the forums seem to be. And, they seem to be the same set who like to argue without end because it makes them feel alive which probably marginalizes them offline too.
post #35 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Film Noir Buff View Post
Also, most of the men who I have observed buy custom suits don't care if the suits last more than a few years. To make a comparison, shirt fabrics in 140s-220s seem to be the favorites around the forums. No way those last as long as a good 100s but people dont seem to care. Which means the set that prefer the heavier stuff here constitute a fringe confederacy.

This could be because people are more willing to treat shirts as disposable items. They're much cheaper, after all. Also, my shirts don't get worn as often since I have many more of them than I do suits or jackets.
post #36 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
This could be because people are more willing to treat shirts as disposable items. They're much cheaper, after all. Also, my shirts don't get worn as often since I have many more of them than I do suits or jackets.
And I think you should indulge yourself in the heaviest fabrics your heart desires. Have I ever suggested differently? I find it provocative to hear people maintain that heavier fabric is best and lighter fabric is "tissue paper". It has a smidgen of truth to it but that declaration is far more misleading than useful. I also think we should be thankful for lighter fabrics, I will wager that heavier fabrics are partly to blame for the trend to not wear suits. If you are a suit hobbyist and you have discovered that quality, heavier suits last longer, then that's great but I see most men buying custom suits for a different purpose than their lasting a long time.
post #37 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Film Noir Buff View Post
And I think you should indulge yourself in the heaviest fabrics your heart desires. Have I ever suggested differently?

I find it provocative to hear people maintain that heavier fabric is best and lighter fabric is "tissue paper". It has a smidgen of truth to it but that declaration is far more misleading than useful.

I also think we should be thankful for lighter fabrics, I will wager that heavier fabrics are partly to blame for the trend to not wear suits.

If you are a suit hobbyist and you have discovered that quality, heavier suits last longer, then that's great but I see most men buying custom suits for a different purpose than their lasting a long time.

In response to your indication of a 'fringe confederacy', I was simply pointing out that there may be some sound rationale behind why some people simultaneously prefer low-number suiting cloth and high-number shirting fabric. I don't know if this rationale applies to all, or even many, but it applies to me.
post #38 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
I was simply pointing out that there may be some sound rationale behind why some people simultaneously prefer low-number suiting cloth and high-number shirting fabric. I don't know if this rationale applies to all, or even many, but it applies to me.

Also, you wear shirts next to your skin, but suit cloth touches nothing but part of your legs, which are not that sensetive.

To the OP, the most durable cloths out there are probably four-harness worsteds (like hopsack) in heavy weights, and also tight tweeds like thornproof.
post #39 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
In response to your indication of a 'fringe confederacy', I was simply pointing out that there may be some sound rationale behind why some people simultaneously prefer low-number suiting cloth and high-number shirting fabric. I don't know if this rationale applies to all, or even many, but it applies to me.
I think most men like the finer shirt cloths because of the feel but the shirts have short lives and they're very expensive. I think some of the finer shirt fabrics have to bring a four shirt order near to a suit cost. I do resent people making assertions based solely on their rationalizations. If some people on here want to believe that the bulk of custom clients are fools to pick 7-8oz suit cloths, then I don't think they're seeing things the way they are but only the way they think important or correct. When someone wants a dumpy frumpy woman because they want one, that's fine. When someone has one because they haven't the confidence or game to get anything else and then declares that their choice is superior to those sexier, short lasting models, it provokes me to some response, if not all out laughter.
post #40 of 56
Hot weather, light cloth.

Cool weather, medium cloth.

Cold weather, heavy cloth.

Why is this so hard to understand?
post #41 of 56
Sharkskin. I prefer great white.
post #42 of 56
Most strong is bag for potato!
post #43 of 56
A shame this thread is so old. I'd be curious to hear if there are big differences in durability between say, nailhead, sharkskin, birdseye, herringbone, etc.
I don't believe S-number and fabric weight are the only factors that contribute to a cloth's durability. Tightness of the weave and type of weave may also be factors.
Is there anyone who knows more about this and is willing to share?
post #44 of 56
notice how many people posting in this thread are BANNED! Hilarious...
post #45 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by vida View Post

notice how many people posting in this thread are BANNED! Hilarious...

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