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Urine on Dry Denim - Page 2

post #16 of 28
I was watching a documentary about Pompeii and they used to use urine to wash clothing. Laundrys would leave piss pots outside their doors and the guys would relieve themselves there. Who knew?
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward Appleby
And hydrochloric acid is just a bunch of ions in solution in water, but I wouldn't consider the two to have similar solvencies...

Yeah that was a non sequitur. Of course stuff floating about in a solvent could affect solubility of things in it.

So, urea is used in dying with indigo to fix the dye in the fabric? Once the fabric is immersed in indigo solution, urea is added, so the indigo oxidises and can't be washed out?
post #18 of 28
Thread Starter 
I thought it oxidized when it was removed from the solution and exposed to air?
post #19 of 28
its oxidized when the vat is exposed to air. you dont remove the indigo from the solution
post #20 of 28
Thread Starter 
I meant the cloth, so I guess we're talking the same thing? I'm retarded.
post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by stach
I was watching a documentary about Pompeii and they used to use urine to wash clothing. Laundrys would leave piss pots outside their doors and the guys would relieve themselves there. Who knew?
Question: when does urine, as mentioned above, go "stale"?

As to the text quoted above, yes, urine was used in dying and cleaning in ancient Rome. The Emperor Vespasian actually passed a tax on urine (don't ask me how it was enforced, it's what the prof said), which was why up until the mid-20th century, the outdoor latrines on many French blocks were known as vespasiennes.
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJMan
Question: when does urine, as mentioned above, go "stale"?
...

From wikipedia (where else?):

Quote:
In cases of kidney or urinary tract infection (UTI), the urine will contain bacteria, but otherwise urine is virtually sterile and nearly odorless when it leaves the body. However, after that, bacteria that contaminate the urine will convert chemicals in the urine into smelling chemicals that are responsible for the distinctive odor of stale urine; in particular, ammonia is produced from urea.
post #23 of 28
Can't they add BHT to preserve freshness?
post #24 of 28
Urea is also used in skin creams for certain superficial problems.
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Urea is also used in skin creams for certain superficial problems.

What type of problems? Specifically, what if any effect would it have on blotchy, exzcema type of skin?
post #26 of 28
Diazolydinol urea is a preservative. In small amounts, a lot of 'active' ingredients function purely as preservatives (titanium dioxide is another). In larger amounts, urea functions essentially as a moisturizer. In both cases, it is synthetically produced. No one is pissing in your moisturizer.
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel
Specifically, what if any effect would it have on blotchy, exzcema type of skin?

Google "urine therapy".
post #28 of 28
So boring without superfuture, huh? LabelKing > By the way, urea is very common in skincare products. However, when used in skincreams it's called "carbamide" so customers won't be scared off. Now go and check you moisturizers contents!
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