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2009 US Open Thread - Page 12

post #166 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwiteaboy View Post
That was astounding. Where did that forehand come from?

That's what I was wondering. Congrats to del Porto! He is one of only two men who have beaten Roger in a Grand Slam Final (the other being Rafa Nadal).
post #167 of 177
No, the only 2 men to beat Roger in a final are Rafa and Roger.
post #168 of 177
That was a great match until the final set. Not the outcome I would have liked to see, but you have to hand it to del Potro. Dominating Nadal in straight sets and then going the distance with Federer at his level of experience is incredible. The between-the-legs shot against Djokovic was glorious. Makes me glad we have things like slow-motion replays and YouTube.
post #169 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by King Francis View Post
The between-the-legs shot against Djokovic was glorious. Makes me glad we have things like slow-motion replays and YouTube.

Shown once again:

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post #170 of 177
Del potro is likely the next big thing, he has a far FAR better mental game than Murray or Djokevic. Still it is likely he won't win another major for 1-2 years, Federer and Rafa have another 6 or so between them if Rafa gets back to full strength.
post #171 of 177
Doubt that many ppl from this particular thread have the intellectual capacity to understand and embrace this article, but for the few fair-minded AMERICANS that permeate this thread, take a look. Broke ass haters racists stay away. Your hate, anger and jealously is predictable but, as an American, absurdly bemusing.

Double Standard for Serena Williams Sports

Dave Zirin: Why is Roger Federer's on-the-court meltdown acceptable while Serena Williams's outburst is cause for a national apology tour?



In US Open finals on September 14, Federer lost in five sets to the previously unheralded Juan Martín del Potro. In a tense third set, after a challenge by del Potro, Federer became infuriated with the line judge. After the judge told Federer to settle down, he said, "Don't tell me to be quiet, OK? I don't give a [expletive] what [del Potro] said, OK?" The 6-foot-6 power-serving Argentinean frustrated Federer throughout, and the favored player lost his famous cool. But after the match, there were no press conference apologies from Federer. And there were no calls for him to be suspended, fined or sanctioned. This despite the fact that his profanity was directed toward del Potro, a serious breach in tennis etiquette.

Williams without question lost control as well. After being called for a critical foot fault in her semifinal match against Kim Clijsters, she said to the line judge, "If I could, I would take this [expletive] ball and shove it down your [expletive] throat." The foot fault was a terrible call, and it cost Williams the match. After her rant, she was given a point penalty, and the match was effectively over as Clijsters looked on in a state of bewilderment. It's worth mentioning that the call by the line judge was the equivalent of calling a technical foul in Game 7 of the NBA finals with the score tied in the closing seconds.

The behavior of Federer and Williams in these matches are examples of bad sportsmanship at its worst. But the double standard is enough to make you want to swallow your tennis ball. When Williams lost it on the court, she later apologized and admitted idolizing tennis's infamous enfant terrible John McEnroe. McEnroe, now an announcer on CBS, responded, "I guess she idolized me for the wrong reasons, apparently. I feel like I'm on the hot seat now.... I can't defend the indefensible." His co-anchor, Mary Carillo, was even harsher, saying, Williams "could have won the Oscar" for her calm performance at the press conference after the match.

On September 13 on ESPN2, Carillo called for Williams's suspension, saying, "If you care about the integrity of your sport, you throw somebody out of the game for a while." Later, she called Williams's $10,500 fine a "joke" and an "embarrassment." By contrast, when Federer cursed, CBS broadcaster Dick Enberg drew a distinction that it was not "venomous."

The question is not whether Williams was right or Federer was wrong. They were both wrong. The question is whether hypocrisy is acceptable. The double standard is obvious if we perform the gender flip test: if Williams were a man, would her behavior have been met with similar outrage?

To ask the question is to answer it: from McEnroe to Jimmy Connors, male players who blow their tops are part of tennis lore. McEnroe has repeatedly made calls for current pros to not be "robots" and have the "passion" he displayed. But in the country-club white-skirt-and-ponytail world of women's tennis, different behavior is expected. Williams, to put it mildly, doesn't wear white. She is the person who introduced the "cat suit" to the tennis court. Her physical dominance is heretical to demure expectations that still permeate the sport.

When you couple gender expectations with racial ones, the inconsistency is no longer just obvious, it's glaring. If Williams were a petite blonde, like 17-year-old American Melanie Oudin, and was called for a match-ending foot-fault-cum-disqualification, the US Open crowd would have turned Arthur Ashe Stadium into Attica. But Williams was booed throughout the match against Clijsters; and when her outburst began, the booing intensified. The next day when she played doubles with her sister Venus, Serena Williams was repeatedly heckled. Her "Americanness" at the US Open was in open question in the way a white player's cultural heritage never would be. Ironically, her most infamous match against Clijsters, as all tennis fans know, was at Indian Wells in 2001 where she was subjected to repeated racial taunts and slurs. She has boycotted Indian Wells ever since and has said she will continue to do so, even though she has been threatened with fines and sanctions.

The Williams sisters' ascendance from Compton to queens of the tennis world has been well documented and earned them millions of dollars plus fans around the world. But it has also gained them tons of detractors, from the stands to the blogosphere. ] This doesn't excuse Serena Williams's conduct, and it's not an attempt to "play the race card"; it's just a fact. When it comes to conquering race and gender in tennis, we are nowhere near match point.
post #172 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCPHIL View Post
Doubt that many ppl from this particular thread have the intellectual capacity to understand and embrace this article, but for the few fair-minded AMERICANS that permeate this thread, take a look. Broke ass haters racists stay away. Your hate, anger and jealously is predictable but, as an American, absurdly bemusing.

Double Standard for Serena Williams Sports

Dave Zirin: Why is Roger Federer's on-the-court meltdown acceptable while Serena Williams's outburst is cause for a national apology tour?



In US Open finals on September 14, Federer lost in five sets to the previously unheralded Juan Martín del Potro. In a tense third set, after a challenge by del Potro, Federer became infuriated with the line judge. After the judge told Federer to settle down, he said, "Don't tell me to be quiet, OK? I don't give a [expletive] what [del Potro] said, OK?" The 6-foot-6 power-serving Argentinean frustrated Federer throughout, and the favored player lost his famous cool. But after the match, there were no press conference apologies from Federer. And there were no calls for him to be suspended, fined or sanctioned. This despite the fact that his profanity was directed toward del Potro, a serious breach in tennis etiquette.

Williams without question lost control as well. After being called for a critical foot fault in her semifinal match against Kim Clijsters, she said to the line judge, "If I could, I would take this [expletive] ball and shove it down your [expletive] throat." The foot fault was a terrible call, and it cost Williams the match. After her rant, she was given a point penalty, and the match was effectively over as Clijsters looked on in a state of bewilderment. It's worth mentioning that the call by the line judge was the equivalent of calling a technical foul in Game 7 of the NBA finals with the score tied in the closing seconds.

The behavior of Federer and Williams in these matches are examples of bad sportsmanship at its worst. But the double standard is enough to make you want to swallow your tennis ball. When Williams lost it on the court, she later apologized and admitted idolizing tennis's infamous enfant terrible John McEnroe. McEnroe, now an announcer on CBS, responded, "I guess she idolized me for the wrong reasons, apparently. I feel like I'm on the hot seat now.... I can't defend the indefensible." His co-anchor, Mary Carillo, was even harsher, saying, Williams "could have won the Oscar" for her calm performance at the press conference after the match.

On September 13 on ESPN2, Carillo called for Williams's suspension, saying, "If you care about the integrity of your sport, you throw somebody out of the game for a while." Later, she called Williams's $10,500 fine a "joke" and an "embarrassment." By contrast, when Federer cursed, CBS broadcaster Dick Enberg drew a distinction that it was not "venomous."

The question is not whether Williams was right or Federer was wrong. They were both wrong. The question is whether hypocrisy is acceptable. The double standard is obvious if we perform the gender flip test: if Williams were a man, would her behavior have been met with similar outrage?

To ask the question is to answer it: from McEnroe to Jimmy Connors, male players who blow their tops are part of tennis lore. McEnroe has repeatedly made calls for current pros to not be "robots" and have the "passion" he displayed. But in the country-club white-skirt-and-ponytail world of women's tennis, different behavior is expected. Williams, to put it mildly, doesn't wear white. She is the person who introduced the "cat suit" to the tennis court. Her physical dominance is heretical to demure expectations that still permeate the sport.

When you couple gender expectations with racial ones, the inconsistency is no longer just obvious, it's glaring. If Williams were a petite blonde, like 17-year-old American Melanie Oudin, and was called for a match-ending foot-fault-cum-disqualification, the US Open crowd would have turned Arthur Ashe Stadium into Attica. But Williams was booed throughout the match against Clijsters; and when her outburst began, the booing intensified. The next day when she played doubles with her sister Venus, Serena Williams was repeatedly heckled. Her "Americanness" at the US Open was in open question in the way a white player's cultural heritage never would be. Ironically, her most infamous match against Clijsters, as all tennis fans know, was at Indian Wells in 2001 where she was subjected to repeated racial taunts and slurs. She has boycotted Indian Wells ever since and has said she will continue to do so, even though she has been threatened with fines and sanctions.

The Williams sisters' ascendance from Compton to queens of the tennis world has been well documented and earned them millions of dollars plus fans around the world. But it has also gained them tons of detractors, from the stands to the blogosphere. ] This doesn't excuse Serena Williams's conduct, and it's not an attempt to "play the race card"; it's just a fact. When it comes to conquering race and gender in tennis, we are nowhere near match point.

The key difference is that what Federer said wasn't threatening. While swearing and yelling at an umpire, he was not insulting in the manner that saying you want to shove a ball down someone's throat it. To even remotely compare them is strange. I remember when Chela spat at someone, that was bad. But a tiff with an umpire where federer threw in 2 'fucks' in an otherwise perfectly normal sentence is extremely different from a sentence that even without the swear words would be completely unacceptable.
post #173 of 177
As I already said. Move on bigots and haters. Let non-American Roger be down match point, receive a bad foot fault call and I am sure that you'd condone it. The Wms are over it. They are probably at one of their mansions, here or abroad, shopping on 5th, Worth or Rodeo, raking up endorsement, and, most recently, buying into the Miami Dolphins. Sure they don't care what you or I think for that matter, but I for one love to support Americans, even when they are insufferable brats like Mc, Conners or mealy mouthed simpletions afraid to support the WTA founders like Everet. Kudos for getting through the Nation though...
post #174 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCPHIL View Post
As I already said. Move on bigots and haters. Let non-American Roger be down match point, receive a bad foot fault call and I am sure that you'd condone it. The Wms are over it. They are probably at one of their mansions, here or abroad, shopping on 5th, Worth or Rodeo, raking up endorsement, and, most recently, buying into the Miami Dolphins. Sure they don't care what you or I think for that matter, but I for one love to support Americans, even when they are insufferable brats like Mc, Conners or mealy mouthed simpletions afraid to support the WTA founders like Everet. Kudos for getting through the Nation though...
I agree with SField. I also think it's intellectually shallow to presume somebody is a "bigot" and a "hater" just because they don't agree with you. The fact is, there is a major difference between what Serena and Roger said. Serena Williams could arguably be charged with a CRIMINAL offence for her stupidity. The same is unequivocally untrue about Roger's remarks. Threat of death vs. flippancy. That's the difference.
post #175 of 177
+1 Agree with SField. DCPHIL move on. The you are just shitting up a board that does not want you or value anything you have to say. You seem to know a good deal about tennis, but you act like such a twat that I have trouble seeing past that (calling people racist bigots who disagree with you on grounds that have nothing to do with racism or bigotry). Why you would want to talk to people about something you obviously care about like that is perplexing.
post #176 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCPHIL View Post
As I already said. Move on bigots and haters. Let non-American Roger be down match point, receive a bad foot fault call and I am sure that you'd condone it. The Wms are over it. They are probably at one of their mansions, here or abroad, shopping on 5th, Worth or Rodeo, raking up endorsement, and, most recently, buying into the Miami Dolphins. Sure they don't care what you or I think for that matter, but I for one love to support Americans, even when they are insufferable brats like Mc, Conners or mealy mouthed simpletions afraid to support the WTA founders like Everet. Kudos for getting through the Nation though...

DCPhil - I don't think it's impossible at all that if Federer was in the same situation that he would not have acted exactly the same. In fact last year when he lost more often, his tearful losses that stole the thunder of the winners was very distasteful. However, you're still speculating, and given that one of my favorites in the last couple years has been Monfils, I cannot really say that your allegations of using race as yardstick by which to measure the character of an athlete is at all substantial.

The Williams sisters elevated the level of play in women's tennis (some might think for the worse - I'd disagree), so I don't really have a problem with them. However, the fact remains that Federer didn't do anything remotely as obscene as she did. Pointing out this fact isn't racist, it's just recognizing what is irrefutably true. Carrying on like a child hurling a rather heavy sack of shit that is an accusation of racism takes away whatever credibility you think you might have, though I suspect that you don't care too much for your credibility.
post #177 of 177
Good intro from Russell Simmons. Non-haters check out Wms autobiogrpahy. Thoughtful, insightful and pretty well written. Add to that, it's NYT Bestseller. Good job, Serena..

This blog is from my dear friend, Serena Williams, who I love for her tennis, but more importantly love for her gifts to humanity. She has done amazing charitable work around the world, and has recently joined the African Angels for the Diamond Empowerment Fund. I really believe that she can become her generation's Muhammad Ali, as she continues to do amazing work to help others. I highly recommend her new book, On The Line, which has already become a New York Times' Bestseller!!! Make sure you pick up a copy. Thank you Serena for your beautiful blog.

-Russell Simmons

-------------------------------------

There are believers, there are those that are hopeless, thoughtless, dreamers, those that are ambitious, the fearful, the brave, the fighters, the lovers, the survivors, the dependent, the independent & I am Serena Williams. I am all of the above plus a tennis player & now an author. I am the author of "On The Line." I am a woman, an African-American woman. Yes, I've faced adversity and unlike some, I've faced it under the lights and under the attention of the world. I am not only an American tennis player, I am an African-American daughter, sister, aunt, cousin, friend, but to the world I am an international tennis player.

The thought of the weight I carry can sometimes be paralyzing, to some, but for me, I enjoy it. I enjoy being told I'm too fat to win, or my career is over - I've seen my glory days. This is what everyone was saying about me publicly, in papers, quietly at home. But as Maya Angelou said, "And still I rise."

In my book "On the line" it focuses on my fall from grace.

At the time in 2003, I had it all. Fame, friends, companies ready to sponsor me, grand slams wins. I hardly ever lost. Until it all came crashing down.

It started with surgery. Will I be able to play again? No one knew that my quadriceps muscle had completely detached from my knee. The doctors had to re-attach it.

Then came the tragic violent death of my sister.

Losing is synonymous to my life on & off court, which often leaves me on the line. But the loss of my sister made me wonder, is tennis even worth my time?

In bed and inconsolable, I did not know where to turn.

In a search for clarity, as a people, we search for the letters, letters that form words, words form expression. I could find no clarity.

All I knew is I had it all, and now - now I was at the bottom of the bucket- could I rise again? Did I even want to rise?

Growing up with my family was an experience I would love to do again. I was the youngest of 5 girls, so I pretty much got my way and got anything I wanted - which you will read in the book all the "younger sister" things I did. To sum it up, I was BAD. I never thought that my life would take me to where I am now, and how grateful I have been to be apart of something so cool, so amazing.

I never thought I would be winning so many matches.
I never thought I would travel the world.
I never thought I would play and do something I adore so much for money.
I never thought I would have to fall from the mountaintop to appreciate everything.
I never thought my faith would be tested.
I never thought I would have to tell my mom, that her daughter, my sister is dead.

There are many things I never thought I would even share with you all, but I really put it all on the line.

It will help you understand me, who I am. I am human, I make mistakes. I'm not a robot and I can't win them all. I don't even want to, because losing helps you appreciate being alive!

In my book "On the Line," I want everyone to not only enjoy it, but I would like everyone to learn from it- how to stay strong when it seems like everyone is pulling against you.

How to stay positive, how to pull through. Because in the end, there is a light that always gets brighter- you just have to keep reaching for it.

Xxx
Serena Williams
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