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I knew there was a catch - Page 3

post #31 of 35
One sentence isn't plagiarism.

My way of working usually involves reading a few studies / books / articles about the subject on hand and after that i write the skeleton of my text. Then i start to fill the skeleton from what i have in my mind and if i come across difficulties forming it i go back to some other text, read it through and if there is a sentence that explains the problem excellently i read it through and copy paste it then i restylize it the way i could have told it.



Plagiarism 101 for dummies.
post #32 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rubber
One sentence isn't plagiarism.

My way of working usually involves reading a few studies / books / articles about the subject on hand and after that i write the skeleton of my text. Then i start to fill the skeleton from what i have in my mind and if i come across difficulties forming it i go back to some other text, read it through and if there is a sentence that explains the problem excellently i read it through and copy paste it then i restylize it the way i could have told it.



Plagiarism 101 for dummies.

And you cite where appropriate. You forgot to mention that. Right?

Taking even one sentence is, in fact, plagiarism. It might not be a huge case of it, but it is by definition.

bob
post #33 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rubber
Plagiarism 101 for dummies.

That explains it excellently.
post #34 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdawson808
And you cite where appropriate. You forgot to mention that. Right?

Taking even one sentence is, in fact, plagiarism. It might not be a huge case of it, but it is by definition.

bob

Oddly enough, this can get really complicated. I just finished writing a journal paper, what we call a 'process review paper' in my trade, and I employed massive amounts of deliberation on citation.

Descriptions of the process are fairly common. I probably read twenty or so, a key pont of all of them is that the process is a hybrid of two parent processes. I just plaigiarized a source. The process is a combination of two parent processes. Just plagiarized another. They pretty much all used 'parent' and some word or other that meant 'combination' phrased in some manner. Where does the 'generally known' items that you don't have to cite end?

I adhere to the spirit of the concept, and tend to operate on the idea that if I see the same idea or fact expressed in two or more places that aren't cross cited, I write it without citation provided I'm not copying any more text than a single word or two -- for instance, I didn't cite the guy who used 'hybrid.'

Is this reasonable?

Were archival at sites like turnitin required, it's a deal breaker for me and the college.

If any of my Profs were submitting my papers to a database (not just to check, but for archive), I'd consider it a massive violation of trust. Sometimes, depending on the degree of respect and consaguinity I feel with a Prof, I may write papers that contain a great deal of personal content that is not allowed outside of that single interaction without permission.

BTW, rd, do you know how copyright works at colleges? Is any license granted for reproduction of material that you do and turn in as part of coursework?

Regards,
Huntsman
post #35 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman
Oddly enough, this can get really complicated. I just finished writing a journal paper, what we call a 'process review paper' in my trade, and I employed massive amounts of deliberation on citation.

Descriptions of the process are fairly common. I probably read twenty or so, a key pont of all of them is that the process is a hybrid of two parent processes.

As you note, though, this sounds like "common knowledge". I don't know your field, but if 20 sources say the same thing then to me it is common knowledge. However, for a student I might tell them to simply say "As many sources note..." and then give the old "cf. etc."

Maybe what I should have said in response to the other post was "One sentence could be plagiarism. It depends on the sentence."


Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman
The process is a combination of two parent processes. Just plagiarized another.

No you didn't. You admitted in the preceeding sentences that you read that in other sources and we are clearly having a debate over plagiarism.

The whole point is whether or not the ideas that you write down are your own. That is ultimately what matters whether it is one sentence or an entire paper.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman
I see the same idea or fact expressed in two or more places that aren't cross cited, I write it without citation provided I'm not copying any more text than a single word or two. Is this reasonable?

I think so. But they are only words.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman
If any of my Profs were submitting my papers to a database (not just to check, but for archive), I'd consider it a massive violation of trust. Sometimes, depending on the degree of respect and consaguinity I feel with a Prof, I may write papers that contain a great deal of personal content that is not allowed outside of that single interaction without permission.

I guess I approach this two ways:
1. Other students have absolutely no access to the database.
2. That other faculty at other institutions have access to it does not violate your privacy because we do not know you and also because in this case the information (your paper with personal details) is being used for pedagogical reasons. We don't care about the actual content beyond that our student copied from you.
3. I'm not sure about this, but I don't think in the case of a paper from another school (or even ours) that we have access to the original paper. Websites, we definitely have access to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman
BTW, rd, do you know how copyright works at colleges? Is any license granted for reproduction of material that you do and turn in as part of coursework?

I am not sure, but here in the US I would think it all works the same no matter who writes it. But I could be 100% wrong (in terms of ownership). That said, I don't think there is any case to say a student has a right under copyright law to bar the school from submitting the paper to such a database. Educational use is exempt (within reason). Now, debate "within reason"!

bob
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