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Would you employ an attorney that didn't wear a suit and tie to meetings? - Page 5

post #61 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by TC (Houston) View Post
Only exception is when a client has expressed that he or she would be more comfortable if I would dress down.

Out of interest, how frequently does this happen?
post #62 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hotchpotch View Post
Out of interest, how frequently does this happen?

It has happened only a handful of times.
post #63 of 109
When we sold the company I used to work for, our counsel wore chinos, and odd brown jacket, no tie, and a lavender shirt to "term sheet" meeting. Of course, this is the tech industry and everyone dresses down but still far from your typical legal uniform. They did an excellent job, the deal went through six weeks later and came along with a bill for nearly 3% of the sale price.
post #64 of 109
NO!!
post #65 of 109
I was very close to working for a large, California-based litigation firm that is entirely casual outside the courtroom - like shorts and flip-flops casual. And yes, they do market their "dress code" very well to law students. In part, they're trying to say that they're good enough to wear whatever they damn well please. I ended up working for another firm, but would I - as a general counsel - hire the casual firm? You bet. Why? They win. A lot.
post #66 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pelikan2 View Post
I was very close to working for a large, California-based litigation firm that is entirely casual outside the courtroom - like shorts and flip-flops casual. And yes, they do market their "dress code" very well to law students. In part, they're trying to say that they're good enough to wear whatever they damn well please. I ended up working for another firm, but would I - as a general counsel - hire the casual firm? You bet. Why? They win. A lot.

Definitely Quinn.
post #67 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imperator View Post
Definitely Quinn.

Yep.
post #68 of 109
When I was involved in divorcing that bloody termagant my second wife, I never saw my attorney in a tie--most probably because my attorney was a woman.

I actually had considerable sympathy for my wife's attorney during the divorce proceedings. He always seemed like a force for reason, decency and moderation. I was told that he couldn't stand my wife, which was a natural enough reaction.

That was the wife who vanished mysteriously later, not the one who blew up.
post #69 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post
That was the wife who vanished mysteriously later, not the one who blew up.

It's a good thing that you are unfamiliar with gunpowder, otherwise, you might be a suspect.


- B
post #70 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
It's a good thing that you are unfamiliar with gunpowder, otherwise, you might be a suspect.


- B

Fortunately, she used gas.
post #71 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pelikan2 View Post
I was very close to working for a large, California-based litigation firm that is entirely casual outside the courtroom - like shorts and flip-flops casual. And yes, they do market their "dress code" very well to law students. In part, they're trying to say that they're good enough to wear whatever they damn well please. I ended up working for another firm, but would I - as a general counsel - hire the casual firm? You bet. Why? They win. A lot.

Quinn claims to win a lot -- they're good at self-promotion. John Quinn's certainly an excellent trial lawyer, and is a legitimate choice for a big business trial. In admittedly sporadic experience, I've found the firm as a whole to be fairly hit-and-miss (they do have a number of other very good lawyers besides Quinn himself). They sell clients on the whole "litigation is war" ethos, which then becomes the justification for billing the bejesus out of a case -- sometimes to good effect, sometimes not so much.
post #72 of 109
I've practiced for 23 years and what can be worn has changed dramatically. Being a good SF dude, albeit an older SF dude, I started wearing suits after years of every day as casual Friday. I have received much more reaction for wearing suits than bad khakis. Now I started out in largish law, at least for Milwaukee, got wise, and now have run my own firm for the last 16 years. At my first firm, the saying was that you could always tell when a partner was on vacation when he showed up at the firm wearing a blazer. The tie was assumed. The only lawyers who wear suits regularly now are those heading to court. As a business lawyer, I feel I have risked my client relationships more by wearing a suit. But owning my own firm, I don't care what my clients think. I know they like me and my advice. Don't like me? Hire one of the hundreds of other lawyers you know. Having read most of the comments here, I'm so happy I can do what I want, decide how much I want to work and for whom I do the work. I would die working at "Big Law." Why so many get so excited by it astounds me. So bright and so stupid. Now Mafoo can tell me how small I am.
post #73 of 109
I am a federal prosecutor, and seven years out of law school. As such, I am the lead prosecutor on all my cases. I have two rules for my co-counsel. One: wear a suit and polish your shoes. Two: "fun" is for your personal life -- get used to working long hours.

Call me old fashioned, or call me a wardrobe Nazi. Either way, you will always wear a suit and tie when you are on my trial team. For what its worth, we never lose. Never.
post #74 of 109
You remind me of my mantra when I started my own firm. No matter how long I work, I will never work for another lawyer again. Stick your suit up your ass.
post #75 of 109
For what its worth, we never lose. Never.[/QUOTE


Good, you are 3% better than the average federal prosecutor. And an asshole. I love government employees with attitude.
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