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Studio 60, Aaron Sorkin's new TV project - Page 2

post #16 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horace
I don't know anything about Studio 60, but at Studio 54, LK was known to throw decadent parties in the back room. My attorney Roy Cohn and I used to attend.
That was my thought too. I have no idea what this Studio 60 is.

Halston used to get a little too frisky.
post #17 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arethusa
In all honesty, the dialogue almost always felt like a stitched together collection of What Aaron Sorkin Learned This Week. The quotations, the references, and the laws were always banal and far too often apocryphal. I really felt Sorkin came together and worked when he stopped trying to be smart and stopped trying to convince me that America Works and is Noble Ok and showed me human beings. Didn't happen often enough, but when it did, it was superb.
The fact that everyone spoke in a fake (and similar, just not realistic) cadence always turned me off to that show. The subject matter I could take or leave - I am always up for propaganda done well, and this wasn't that.
post #18 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
The fact that everyone spoke in a fake (and similar, just not realistic) cadence always turned me off to that show. The subject matter I could take or leave - I am always up for propaganda done well, and this wasn't that.
Pretty much my problem with it too - I have never seen an episode that didn't play out exactly like this:

How to write for The West Wing.
post #19 of 30
The show was never the same after Ainsley (Emily Procter) left.
post #20 of 30
I have heard about this new show and am hopeful that it will be as good as Sorkin's last few. SportsNight was one of the best shows ever - and having the complete series DVD collection, I am lucky in that I can still watch it when I choose - just wish it had lasted a few more seasons.

The West Wing had its ups and downs, but most of the ups came when Sorkin himself was crafting the dialogue and most of the downs came when he had stepped away and other writers were trying to turn it into another typical primetime soap opera. (SportsNight also declined in quality a bit when Sorkin left briefly to start the West Wing - but the characters were stronger IMHO).

Looking forward to Studio 60!
post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGladwell
You sound an awful lot like someone who came into age politically during these nightmare years. Rest assured that government wasn't always this bad.

I am sorry, but this statement is just wrong. Ever since LBJ, and definitely since '71, young people have felt like government did not work. The youth of America disliked LBJ, Nixon, Carter, Reagan and Bush 1. Many felt betrayed by Clinton and most hate Bush 2. I think that it is a matter of:

1) the leftover angst of adolescence
2) the lack of real political education before the age of 21
3) that they have not seen that every administration has its failings but that the reason the systesm works is that it was built to make sure that bad individuals could not radically effect the entire system.

Arethusa is a great example of 1 & 3 and possibly 2 as well. The whole point of our constitution is that it is one of institutions and not of strong individuals. That fact lessens the ability of any one person do do excess harm (or good) and preserves the system for us to pass on to the next generation.
post #22 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
Arethusa is a great example of 1 & 3 and possibly 2 as well. The whole point of our constitution is that it is one of institutions and not of strong individuals. That fact lessens the ability of any one person do do excess harm (or good) and preserves the system for us to pass on to the next generation.

Well, I think that depends. If you get rot at the head of all three branches of government at once - i.e. the current situation - then a great deal of harm can be effected in a shockingly short timeframe in our system. Admittedly, it takes longer than it would in other systems, for example Italy's condition since that little crook assumed power. But five years will certainly do it.
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arethusa
In all honesty, the dialogue almost always felt like a stitched together collection of What Aaron Sorkin Learned This Week. The quotations, the references, and the laws were always banal and far too often apocryphal.

This, I totally disagree with. The dialogue wasn't always amazing under Sorkin, but when it worked--and it worked often--it was as musical and rhythmic and exciting as Mamet, just without the profanity. His dialogue could be an art form. The fact that it was so characteristic and individual as to spawn plenty of parody and guides like the one linked on "how to write for TWW" is just the highest form of compliment. His point was never to be naturalistic in his dialogue, it was to be musical and poetic.

I agree that when he was in a slump, though, it really did feel like "a stitched-together collection of What Aaron Sorkin Learned This Week." I just think it was worth it for the really amazing moments.
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGladwell
Well, I think that depends. If you get rot at the head of all three branches of government at once - i.e. the current situation - then a great deal of harm can be effected in a shockingly short timeframe in our system. Admittedly, it takes longer than it would in other systems, for example Italy's condition since that little crook assumed power. But five years will certainly do it.


I think that our country has endured worse and longer. You really ought to have a bit more faith in it.
post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
I think that our country has endured worse and longer. You really ought to have a bit more faith in it.
I agree.
post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATM
I agree.

Brother, can you spare a dime?

Jon.
post #27 of 30
The title of this thread is really throwing me off, I see it out of the corner of my eye everytime I log on. Now I know how Slim must feel...

A.
post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
That was my thought too. I have no idea what this Studio 60 is.

Halston used to get a little too frisky.

Yeah, when Halston broke out the amyl-nitrate, many got nervous.
post #29 of 30
Thread Starter 
More about Studio 60: apparently another comedy superstar, DL Hughley, is involved. Should be a blast!
post #30 of 30
I understand that Judd Hirsch's character does an extended, furious riff on the banality of reality tv and the decline of television programming in general that is not to be missed. First episode, I think, but I'm not sure. According to an 'extra' who was on set when he was shooting, the cast and crew were practically blown away by his performance (for whatever that's worth).
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