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best/worst corporate logos - Page 13

post #181 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Strike
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nantucket Red
Ask the oracle.


Who, me?

Actually, I was referring to that brilliant faux Starbucks logo you posted. She resembles an oracle, albeit a vain, vacuous and vulgar one.
post #182 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdawson808
What does that mean? They offer a product that people like? They offer it a lower price (well, I guess it probably isn't that)? How are they "torching their competitor's shops" metaphorically?

As BrianSD says, don't go there.

Believe me, I don't. I'm sick of Starbucks bullying these charming mom and pop places out of business in my old hometown.

koji
post #183 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by faustian bargain
probably so. although it seems to be a pretty common image to use in crests, and i guess in japan crests are used both for families and for companies...?

here's a similar one for 'yoshino japanes antiques' in pasadena:

Because Japanese companies were often named after the person or family who established them, the logo is often the family crest. These frequently incorporate stylized characters for the name. This picture shows an excellent example: The Mitsui crest, which incorporates the characters for Mitsu (三), or "three," and i (井), or "well." The illustration shows an Edo-period department store. Many of today's major Japanese companies had their beginnings back in the 17th or 18th centuries.

post #184 of 487
*nod* i figured it was a simple explanation like that.

btw for clarification (not yours of course, red, but the non-nipponologues) - 'sakura' is 'cherry blossom' (AFAIK), hence the flower motif.

is there a compelling reason for the circular form of the crests, or is it a tradition whose origins are lost to the mists of time?
post #185 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by faustian bargain
*nod* i figured it was a simple explanation like that.

btw for clarification (not yours of course, red, but the non-nipponologues) - 'sakura' is 'cherry blossom' (AFAIK), hence the flower motif.

is there a compelling reason for the circular form of the crests, or is it a tradition whose origins are lost to the mists of time?

Since it's a slack day, I asked a coworker why most of the crests are round. He explained that, while round crests are popular, they come in many different shapes. They are called kamon, meaning "house mark" literally and "family crest" in properly idiomatic translation. They would be displayed on houses to identify the family, and may have decorated the round ends of roof tiles, which would explain the popularity of the shape. They also decorated the sleeves and back of kimonos. He proceded to search the web and came up with this site that lists a huge variety (in Japanese):

http://www1.ocn.ne.jp/~argus/

I've also found this site in English:

http://www.asgy.co.jp/anglais/index.html
post #186 of 487
post #187 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nantucket Red
Many of today's major Japanese companies had their beginnings back in the 17th or 18th centuries.

Subaru came about in the 50's..

"Subaru" is the Japanese word for the star cluster Pleiades that is depicted in the company logo. The Pleiades (also known as the Seven Sisters) has seven stars visible to the naked eye. The Subaru logo's six stars represent the five companies that came together after World War II to form one large company. While an automotive minnow compared to many of its competitors, Subaru has been a highly profitable company for many years. It is noted for the production of conventional-bodied cars with full-time AWD (in fact, in many markets its entire product range has this feature) and its use of the horizontally-opposed engine.

post #188 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by faustian bargain
it's retro because it's a silhouette of Jerry West, recruited by the Minn. Lakers in 1960: http://ask.yahoo.com/20030912.html


Yeah, I realize that. But still the whole things seems very 70s to me (even though it is even older than that). To me, it says 970s, in a headband, short-shorts, and wristbands sort of way. Of course that's probably because of my age and the fact that the emblem has not changed.

bob
post #189 of 487
- dislike the typeface - hate the logo/badge - totally forgettable.
post #190 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdawson808
...the fact that the emblem has not changed.
bob
In a perfect world a logo would never have to be changed. The logotype should be instantly recognizable, a timeless and boundary-less symbol for the firm. I think if one were to review these many pages of submissions, we'd find several of the favorites are virtually unchanged since their introduction.
post #191 of 487
Branding issues?

John Holmes as the Brawny Man
post #192 of 487
coupla good avatars, right there.
post #193 of 487
How about some good ones from the world of sports.

I've always thought this old Milwaukee Brewers logo was great...


Much better than the awful one they replaced it with...


I'm glad to hear they're actually bringing back the old logo for their alternate uniform this year.
post #194 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrysalid




HAHAhaHAAhahAhAHhahaHAhaha (cue beverage exiting left nostril)
post #195 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bags
How about some good ones from the world of sports.

I've always thought this old Milwaukee Brewers logo was great...



I love that old Brewers logo as well - a lot of people just see a glove and ball and not the letters "m" and "b." It's kind of like the FedEx logo with the "hidden" arrow.
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