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LSAT PowerScore Bibles & Official PrepTests - Page 3

post #31 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oman View Post
Honestly BBSLM, I was in the market to buy the books, but gave up my ambitions once the price shot up to ridiculous levels. I've seen them MUCH cheaper elsewhere. You're getting a pretty good deal here.

I still cant figure out why people bid up auctions so early. I always wait to the last minute, but maybe im doing something wrong.

Cant say I mind in this case, though.
post #32 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by long_knives View Post
I went into law for non-monetary reasons. I wanted a job that would be stimulating and garner at least a modicum of middle-class respectability (which, at least in Canada, lawyers still have). I eschewed the big firms (they also eschewed me!) in favour of a small practice. Four years in and I'm earning decent money, but the work is incredibly stressful (I'm in trial a lot) and has many drawbacks. Clients are a pain, the work can be all consuming and you become incredibly cynical and jaded (for good reason). On the other hand, it can be exhilarating when you win and the work can be both interesting and rewarding.
The way I look at it, any job with any substantial amount of responsibility is going to be stressful, and humans in general are intolerable fucktards, so this isnt really anything unique to being a lawyer. Im already a cynic. Plus, you say a win can be exhilarating, and law (or at least what I gathered from my Business Law I and II undergrad classes) was interesting enough for me to make a living out of it. The negative points you mentioned would not deter *me* from becoming a lawyer. The job Im working now is stressful, the customers (I cant refer to them as 'clients' with a straight face) make me want to murder people, the pay is depressing, and it has zero prestige. Even if all a JD would improve are the 2 latter aspects, count me in.
Quote:
On the whole, I would echo the sentiments of other members and discourage anyone from going into law for money. You will be better served investing the time and money you will spend on law school and bar exams into starting a business.
I would love to go this route. The only problem is I have no imagination or creativity. I could never come up with any business plan that doesnt already exist.
post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBSLM View Post
I would love to go this route. The only problem is I have no imagination or creativity. I could never come up with any business plan that doesnt already exist.
most people that come up with entirely new business plans fail then someone else comes along, takes their idea, innovates and redoes it with better execution generally, $$$ follows
post #34 of 39
post #35 of 39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebastian_Flyte View Post

Yea, these types of gloomy reports is all I have come across lately. I'm almost certainly going to postpone my law school applications and shoot for a paralegal or similar position. Maybe go back to school and fulfill my med school prereqs. Im not happy about it, but I guess I should be grateful this happened before I go $100k+ into debt.
post #36 of 39
Makes me more and more glad to be in Canada...
post #37 of 39
Thread Starter 
The LSAT book auction is back up, the winner hasnt paid or responded to emails.
post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBSLM View Post
The LSAT book auction is back up, the winner hasnt paid or responded to emails.

Quick, somebody make a lawyer joke.
post #39 of 39
People want to be lawyers because it provides a convenient basis of self-worth. Prestige matters, feeling like you're part of the world matters, to be respected and meet or exceed social expectations of you matters. These are the fundamental building blocks of self-respect for all but the most enlightened of young professionals, and the legal world, as fucked up as it is, provides them. As a lawyer, you're involved in work that is important to people. If you're at a huge pyramidal firm, you're working small parts of hundred million dollar+ cases. If you're at a smaller firm, you're working on a small team on a $100k to $several million case. If you're a regulator, you're telling sophisticated business people what to do, a prosecutor, you're putting people in jail. That's all something you can base a little bit of self-worth on. And then there's the sort of self-serving system of achievement created by the legal world: where you went to school, whether you were on law review, where you summered, where you clerked, how much you billed, your bonus, whether you got to argue in court as a second-year, take depositions as a first-year, whether you're on "partner track" (you can lie about this for several years) and so on and so forth. These are all conveniently created credentials that matter to other people-- even if these other people all happen to be lawyers, too. Oh, and the number of convenient excuses for not holding such credentials is practically infinite, which can often allow you to reap much of the joy of actually having the credential for the small price of engaging in a little (self) delusion. So that's the real reason people become lawyers-- why do you think they're so vain? The thing is, though, vanity matters-- again, to all but the most enlightened. And if you want to be more charitable to the legal world, try to equate vanity with the phrase, "carving out a place for yourself in the world," to shift the connotation from shallow, self-centered and superficial to worldly, aware, of known and unwavering identity, and ask yourself if it's really such a bad thing after all.
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