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The paranoid aesthetic? - Page 3

post #31 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13
What about Poe or Hitchcock? I am thinking specifically about Poe's story about the body under the floorboards which haunts the man in the story. I can't remember the title.

Hitchcock was the master of suspense, and I would consider many of his stories very "paranoid".

definitely hitchcock. and almost all of philip k. dicks work.
post #32 of 111
http://www.gianfrancomeza.com/18Euge...finalfinal.jpg

ahh!
post #33 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arethusa
On the mention of Deus Ex, though, I have to say I was disappointed by that. It got the overall atmosphere right, but when it came to creating a compelling game, I was really disappointed. I guess it didn't help that I came to it four years after it was released, but I was expecting more.
what do you mean? you'll have to be more specific. the game was incredibly fun to play, although like all games, it was sort of limited by the fact that you have to play by the game's rules, which in no way resemble the rules of real life. of course this is not the failing of the programmer, it's the failing of the medium
post #34 of 111
I'd say it's more the failing of the designer. I've seen some much more realistic work done with the Unreal engine, and gritty realism most certainly suits the paranoid aesthetic. The lack of freedom and other contrivances didn't help, either. Ultimately, I just felt constrained by plodding and unnecessarily clumsy gameplay (just because it was an RPG didn't mean it had to shoot like one). Which was a shame, because I really wanted to like it. That I ran into a bug at Paul's house that broke the game and made further progress impossible did not help. I gave up trying there. Though, speaking of games, I'd say Max Payne 2 qualifies. I hated the first Max Payne. The sequel is among my favorites. Where the first choked on pulpy cliches, Max Payne 2 created something beautiful with them. Vaguely similar in approach to Kill Bill, though less over the top and not nearly so comedic. Pretty much all cyberpunk qualifies, as well. Especially Ghost in the Shell and especially Innocence.
post #35 of 111
oh so you haven't finished deus ex - that explains it

i really, really recommend that you give it another whirl, deus ex really is something beautiful

i will play max payne 2, i remember seeing it somewhere for like $5
post #36 of 111
I did want to. My attempts to play Deus Ex have so far met with enormous difficulty. I originally bought it, but the cd was defective. I wasn't able to replace it. Eventually, I just downloaded it, but then I got to Paul's apartment that was the end of that. I bet they don't want me to play it.
post #37 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arethusa
I did want to. My attempts to play Deus Ex have so far met with enormous difficulty. I originally bought it, but the cd was defective. I wasn't able to replace it. Eventually, I just downloaded it, but then I got to Paul's apartment that was the end of that. I bet they don't want me to play it.
That's exactly it.

For all its faults (I agree, it has them, and they irritate me every time I reload the game) it is still probably the best computer game ever made, all around. I can only hope that instead of ruining part 3 (like 2) they clone part 1 with a new engine and all the bugs fixed.
post #38 of 111
last i heard, there was some kind of fan-run modification dedicated to updating the graphics and other issues with the original game

this was years ago though, it's probably been declared MIA by now
post #39 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by shellshock

that's a nice tuffett she's sitting on there.
post #40 of 111
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
That's exactly it.

For all its faults (I agree, it has them, and they irritate me every time I reload the game) it is still probably the best computer game ever made, all around.
I heartily agree. Like I said in the other thread, I think it really shows the promise of games to become a legitimate and meaningful artistic medium.

In other news, my relationship to paranoia may have just graduated from intellectual to clinical. I received this with my hot and sour soup:

post #41 of 111
My senior thesis in college was on ABE Kobo, who was a master of the paranoid aesthetic in literature. His best known work is The Woman in the Dunes, which was also made into a quite brilliant movie, both of which I would highly recommend (read the book first for its detailed discussion of the physical dynamics of sand, which is pivotal).

Good essay on Abe can be found here: http://www.themodernword.com/scriptorium/abe.html

The best book I read when researching Abe was Nancy Shields' Fake Fish. It is an engaging and informative read with many compelling images that capture the essence of what Abe evokes. The poster for Abe's play, The Little Elephant is Dead, is representative of the grotesque and disturbing, yet alluring, atmosphere that Abe creates. I was unable to find the image online.
post #42 of 111
David Lynch.
post #43 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tck13
What about Poe or Hitchcock? I am thinking specifically about Poe's story about the body under the floorboards which haunts the man in the story. I can't remember the title.

Hitchcock was the master of suspense, and I would consider many of his stories very "paranoid".

The tell-Tale Heart...

Anyone played the odl game called The Dark Eye?
Just amazing. All based on Poe stories with narration provided by none other than William Burroughs.
post #44 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by skalogre
The tell-Tale Heart...

I was just talking to J about this story the other day. I prefer though, The Cask Of Amontillado and The Gold Bug. I read Edgar Allan Poe when I was eight or nine. I had the Avon collection of stories. It was great.
post #45 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim
I was just talking to J about this story the other day. I prefer though, The Cask Of Amontillado and The Gold Bug. I read Edgar Allan Poe when I was eight or nine. I had the Avon collection of stories. It was great.
You simply MUST find Dark Eye then. The Cask Of Amontillado is one of the stories you play through. Quite an experience, being buried alive then burying yourself alive... http://www.gamespot.com/pc/adventure...ye/review.html P.s. and if you know of W. Burroughs (either through his books, his work with Bryon Gysin or Throbbing Gristle), his involvement only makes the game more bizzarre and unnerving.
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