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Random fashion thoughts - Page 6662  

post #99916 of 109053
We are not forced into a 2 year deal (6 months max, thanks EU), so I think it evens out in the end.
post #99917 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

We are not forced into a 2 year deal (6 months max, thanks EU), so I think it evens out in the end.

Monthly fees are on average much lower but the price price of electronics is higher across the board. Dealing with Orange is pretty much the equivalent of having your nails pulled out but then they have AT&T.
post #99918 of 109053
bless hoodie that unzips into a garbage bag. good stuff japan http://page13.auctions.yahoo.co.jp/jp/auction/r84312829 Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)



also trying to find bless stuff on y!jp is a fucking chore
post #99919 of 109053
Anyone know the quality of messagrie knits?
post #99920 of 109053

Anybody know anything about Baartman and Siegel in terms of quality/fit etc?

Never heard of them prior to it going up on Nomad, but it looks pretty nice for cold NorthEastern winters.

 

http://store.nomadshop.net/collections/baartman-siegel?page=1

post #99921 of 109053
Random Fashion Thought: I'm really surprised that with the move towards more and more customization (not just in clothes, but in everything), someone hasn't started a good bespoke tailoring service for well-designed casual clothes. Not like shirts, but jackets, sweaters, and shoes.

I realize there's much less need for this in non-traditionally tailored clothes, but I can also imagine people using the service for things they can't find elsewhere on the market. I mean, there are M65s right now being sold for $1,250+. I imagine a bespoke tailoring house that specializes in casual clothes could make one for less than that, and just as good.
post #99922 of 109053
^the problem with this is production cost, basically the person would have to be the factory / own the means of production in this case, otherwise it just gets way too expensive. also people that are really paying for $1250 m-65 jackets usually don't give any fucks about MTM, usually they want something and they want it immediately with as little hassle as possible. or they're already getting their bespoke suit made by some old italian guy.
post #99923 of 109053
Well I mean, Luxire is an option for both dressy and casual stuff. You have to be pretty specific with them though (which can be both negative or positive depending on what kind of customer we're speaking of) so it's possible you're right that a "simpler" alternative could be successful
post #99924 of 109053

White Mountaineering have many interesting outerwears this season. 

post #99925 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by toothsomesound View Post

^the problem with this is production cost, basically the person would have to be the factory / own the means of production in this case, otherwise it just gets way too expensive. also people that are really paying for $1250 m-65 jackets usually don't give any fucks about MTM, usually they want something and they want it immediately with as little hassle as possible. or they're already getting their bespoke suit made by some old italian guy.

I don't know what kind of "means of production" you'd really need, TBH. Besides the kind of things you'd find in a tailor's workshop - sewing machines, ironing system, etc. For casualwear, you could probably just get a CAD system to draft your patterns, rather than have some old guy do each piece from scratch, and you might need some washing machines for post-production processes, if that's what the client wanted. I assume you could even contract the last bit out, if those machines are too expensive.

I don't think people who are buying $1,250 jackets are as wedded to RTW as you think though. ToJ has basically built a good business from offering MTM leather jackets, and if they wanted to, they could let people customize some more of the details (it would just add to their work, but I imagine that could be made up for in price).

Jack/ Knife in San Francisco does this, I think. Multiple fittings, designs from scratch, etc. They just do it on the workwear/ denim end -- so things like chore coats, jeans, workwear shirts, etc. I'm just surprised there's not more of it.

There would obviously be some limitations -- like no custom hardware or custom fabrics, which would require big runs -- but I can't really see why there couldn't be a business built from making super high-end casualwear through a bespoke process. Esp for things like jackets, shoes, and knitwear -- where there's already a demand for high-end goods.
post #99926 of 109053
^ one thing I know from trying to get my local tailor to replicate something like a chore coat is he doesn't have the equipment for heavy duty machine stitching. things like M65 or Engineered Garments stuff, I imagine will require a lot of specified industry equipments. not to mention getting the right synthetic materials.
post #99927 of 109053
Isn't there a company out there that's 3D printing MTM sweaters? I forget the name of it.
post #99928 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nil View Post

Isn't there a company out there that's 3D printing MTM sweaters? I forget the name of it.

Loopwheeler?

/jk
post #99929 of 109053
It's not impossible to have a mtm program for casual wear. It's essentially the same as starting a clothing company/brand but the harder part is finding both material vendors and factories/manufacturing that will make the garment/s on a custom, 1 off basis. You could choose to have it all in house but that would take a lot of resources as well as staff. Obviously, controlling the manufacturing would be the best bet as you would not be subject to minimums other than fabric and other items like zippers, buttons, etc. Would also be best to have a brick and mortar location as well for fittings, choosing fabrics, styles, and the like. It could work online but might be defeating the purpose of it all and taking the specialty of getting something mtm.
So in other words, it would take a lot of planning, backing, and know how but not unlike starting any other business.

Personally, I like the idea. It would be nice to go into a place and make something custom or customizable and have it fit perfectly.
post #99930 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

I don't know what kind of "means of production" you'd really need, TBH. Besides the kind of things you'd find in a tailor's workshop - sewing machines, ironing system, etc. For casualwear, you could probably just get a CAD system to draft your patterns, rather than have some old guy do each piece from scratch, and you might need some washing machines for post-production processes, if that's what the client wanted. I assume you could even contract the last bit out, if those machines are too expensive.

I don't think people who are buying $1,250 jackets are as wedded to RTW as you think though. ToJ has basically built a good business from offering MTM leather jackets, and if they wanted to, they could let people customize some more of the details (it would just add to their work, but I imagine that could be made up for in price).

Jack/ Knife in San Francisco does this, I think. Multiple fittings, designs from scratch, etc. They just do it on the workwear/ denim end -- so things like chore coats, jeans, workwear shirts, etc. I'm just surprised there's not more of it.

There would obviously be some limitations -- like no custom hardware or custom fabrics, which would require big runs -- but I can't really see why there couldn't be a business built from making super high-end casualwear through a bespoke process. Esp for things like jackets, shoes, and knitwear -- where there's already a demand for high-end goods.

ToJ was ultimately less about MtM and more about Drew's presence as well as the fact that he was making great jackets at great prices. MtM was a shitshow and produced so many ill-fitting jackets and ugly combinations of shit. Granted, fit problems may be alleviated through actually visiting the tailor etc, but I think that there is already so much awesome stuff out there that if you aren't able to choose custom hardware or custom fabrics, there's really no point.

I think that people are more open to MtM for MC stuff because of its complexity and intimidating nature; most dudes don't wear suits these days, so if you wanted a really, really nice one, bespoke is the way to go because of how rooted it is in tradition. SWD side, I think you have less of "tradition" worship and more of designer worship, where it is more prevalent to be married to designers' visions and philosophies.

It's an interesting question, and honestly I could come up with some cool stuff myself, but I think that I actually prefer aligning myself with people like Schneider or Jun Takahashi or Daiki or Hiroki and trust and like their designs-- almost feels like I'm stepping on some toes if I go out and try to find someone to do a sashiko noragi or some other type of jacket. It would be something if I did everything with my own hands, but it's a weird feeling to pay someone else to do it. It's my reasoning for not using a service like Luxire, even though their concept seems cool. I don't know. I'm having a tough time putting my thoughts down right now.
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