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Random fashion thoughts - Page 6636  

post #99526 of 109053
The Plokhov collab is so cheeseball-futuristic in that Julius sort of way, but I like it. Particularly those mesh-lined funnel neck pullovers

And NewHelmut is way easier to swallow when you look at it as a Plokhov diffusion line. Cause that's basically what it is now
post #99527 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bam!ChairDance View Post

The Plokhov collab is so cheeseball-futuristic in that Julius sort of way, but I like it. Particularly those mesh-lined funnel neck pullovers

And NewHelmut is way easier to swallow when you look at it as a Plokhov diffusion line. Cause that's basically what it is now

Thats what caught my eye too
post #99528 of 109053
Really excited for the +J re-release. Just started a new job recently with a dress code, been needing some work basics
post #99529 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by brad-t View Post


what's wrong with preordering?

I hate waiting, I want to be able to walk into the shop pickit up and walk home.

I know I'm going to get it faster the other way round, but I know myself well enough to now, I can't wait.
post #99530 of 109053

preordering means it gets delivered to you day 1, just don't order the gold one lol

post #99531 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

On the Media has a nice 8min audio clip today on the blurring of the lines between online advertising and online editorial content. (Thought I'd post this here since we were kind of just talking about this)

http://www.onthemedia.org/story/even-blurrier-lines/

I come to the opposite conclusion as the main interviewee.  There has always been a symbiotic relationship between editorial and advertising.  Online "sponsored posts", and the people that can't figure out that something marked "sponsored posts" means that it is paid for directly can't really be helped any way, are pretty clearly advertisement.  The current regulatory system actually allows a more clear delineation between editorial and advertisement, and takes away some of influence peddling that has historically existed.  This is especially true of outlets like Styleforum, which are primarily user-based.  Since there is no centralized control, it's not like we can get everyone in lockstep anyway, without making ourselves irrelevant.

 

If anything, with social media and online publications, the Fourth Estate is as strong, if not stronger, then ever.  

post #99532 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post






All of this.

Uniqlo is the only reason I want to go to Faneuil hall. I keep putting it off because even that isn't a strong enough lure at times.
Don't waste your time. Currently it's just a pop-up (I think they plan to put a full one in there eventually), and their stock is terrible. Pretty much 5 items in stock for mens - non-iron button down, selvage jeans, hooded sweatshirt, v neck sweater and v neck t-shirts. I'm gonna make the trek (it's not far but by bike it is) out to Chestnut Hill mall location. Shake Shack is also a great incentive to get out there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pickpackpockpuck View Post

uniqlo reissuing pieces from +J: http://www.complex.com/style/2014/09/uniqlo-best-of-plus-j-collection-fall-winter-2014

oh, and in case you missed it, plokhov is doing a uniqlo collab. it's all sweats (pics at link): http://racked.com/archives/2014/09/03/helmut-lang-uniqlo.php

So excited about the J+ collection. I really like the long hoodie in the Plokhov collab, I just hope it comes in gray.
post #99533 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

I come to the opposite conclusion as the main interviewee.  There has always been a symbiotic relationship between editorial and advertising.  Online "sponsored posts", and the people that can't figure out that something marked "sponsored posts" means that it is paid for directly can't really be helped any way, are pretty clearly advertisement.  The current regulatory system actually allows a more clear delineation between editorial and advertisement, and takes away some of influence peddling that has historically existed.  This is especially true of outlets like Styleforum, which are primarily user-based.  Since there is no centralized control, it's not like we can get everyone in lockstep anyway, without making ourselves irrelevant.

If anything, with social media and online publications, the Fourth Estate is as strong, if not stronger, then ever.  

More tl;dr stuff for the crapper.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I think we may have heard different things in this piece. The two biggest points I get from it:
  • There has been an erosion in the boundary between independent editorial content and paid content
  • Consumers are increasingly OK with paid content, and take it as the same as independent content.

The second, I think, is indisputable. Just a few pages ago in this thread, most people here said they didn't care how content was created, so long as it was cool. Content is kind of seen like entertainment, rather than reporting or journalism.

As to your point, I'm not convinced that the new system allows for more delineation. Clear delineation is the old system -- on one page we have our independent editorial content, and on the other page, we have advertisers. It's the NYT model, as the interviewee pointed out. But the new online system makes it so that the two bleed into each other. Two points:

  • This isn't just a matter of advertisers influencing editorial content, which I admit, is often murky (just look at the history of consumer fashion publications). It's about purposely masking advertising as editorial. That's the whole point -- to leverage the trust consumers typically have with content and constantly find new and engaging ways to sell them stuff. Because nobody clicks banner ads, so online media has to find new revenue streams. In the old newspaper/ magazine models, the system was relatively simpler, so the influence of advertisers to content was -- in some ways -- much more straightforward. When I worked in music journalism, for example, I would sometimes be taken out to dinners, so that the record label rep could curry favor with me (I was also, on many occasions, invited to strip clubs, which was odd). Now that content is more dynamic, influence seems to be more complicated. You have paid relationships, free gifts, sponsored posts, strange "hat swapping" roles (the PR guy for a company is the same as as the blogger/ reviewer), commissions on sales (outside of affiliate links), so on and so forth.
  • It's also not about just labeling things as sponsored posts. It's about what you put in those sponsored posts. I write for a blog, and we do these "thank you posts" for our advertisers. It's a way to talk about what they do, but also thank them for their support. There's a strict rule, however, that those posts shouldn't have any judgements or calls to action (which I think is a good rule). So no "this product is amazing, you should buy it." That's editorial content. Sponsored posts, IMO, should function sort of the way radio shows sometimes thank their sponsors. "Green-o-Matic washes and dries your clothes in 45 minutes, allowing you to then save time from having to change your clothes from the washer to the dryer." Straightforward factual stuff. But if you look at many blogger's sponsored posts, they're not like that at all. They're basically advertising copy masked as editorial, with the blogger writing the same kind of "you should buy this" pitch read in the press release. Again, this is the whole point: the leverage the trust the blogger has with his audience and use it to sell products. His (or her) opinion is for sale.

Before writing about men's clothing, I honestly wasn't aware of how many relationships there were between writers and companies. TBH, I just kind of assumed that most bloggers were writing about stuff cause they were enthusiastic about it. Now that I write about clothes, the hidden sponsored content of those posts are a lot more obvious. People who are more acute than I was 5 years ago, however, seem to be OK with these new advertorials. Which is what the interviewee says is signifying a certain kind of shift. Less independent media is being created (IMO because it's really hard to make money off a content-driven website) and there's less demand for it.
post #99534 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by pickpackpockpuck View Post

haha. yeah, I noticed that. I think most places figure the general public don't know who plokhov is so they're billing it foremost as a collab with the designer of helmut lang

 

Reinforcing the connection of Plokhov to Helmut Lang makes me want to avoid the Uniqlo collab even more... 

post #99535 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dbear View Post

preordering means it gets delivered to you day 1, just don't order the gold one lol

Yeah but then I know I have one coming and I will be pacing like a child on christmas eve.
post #99536 of 109053
On the road, so a short reply that does your post no justice, but we read the same thing. The problem with bloggers is enforcement, not the regulations proper. The relationships are not more complicated, just more asymmetric, which causes problems; most bloggers have no compensation outside of freebies. You do the math on that.

Re the thank you posts, the "no call to action" is silly. The "buy from our sponsors so that they keep supporting us," is already implicit. And the businesses expect that, no matter how the message is framed, and this is especially true of endemic advertisers. To say "we just will never say it," so we stay impartial," is silly. Of course you want advertisers to success.On public radio, are you going to cut out all subjective descriptors, including "good"?
post #99537 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

Re the thank you posts, the "no call to action" is silly. The "buy from our sponsors so that they keep supporting us," is already implicit. And the businesses expect that, no matter how the message is framed, and this is especially true of endemic advertisers. To say "we just will never say it," so we stay impartial," is silly. Of course you want advertisers to success.On public radio, are you going to cut out all subjective descriptors, including "good"?

I'll admit, I think the whole world of fashion blogging is dirty. I don't think anyone can hold themselves up to some Gold Standard of integrity (like the old NYT model or something). It's just too hard to make money in this business, so there's always going to be a somewhat dirty relationship with brands. Even if we were to stick with the traditional modes of advertising (banner ads on one side; editorial on the other), sites typically don't have a big enough staff to create separate ad selling departments. So when you have the person creating content also selling ads, that alone can be kind of suspect.

But I think there are better and worse ways of doing things, and cutting out editorial content from sponsored posts is better than not.
post #99538 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

I'll admit, I think the whole world of fashion blogging is dirty. I don't think anyone can hold themselves up to some Gold Standard of integrity (like the old NYT model or something). It's just too hard to make money in this business, so there's always going to be a somewhat dirty relationship with brands. Even if we were to stick with the traditional modes of advertising (banner ads on one side; editorial on the other), sites typically don't have a big enough staff to create separate ad selling departments. So when you have the person creating content also selling ads, that alone can be kind of suspect.

But I think there are better and worse ways of doing things, and cutting out editorial content from sponsored posts is better than not.

Fwiw we have a separate sales team.
post #99539 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken P View Post

Don't waste your time. Currently it's just a pop-up (I think they plan to put a full one in there eventually), and their stock is terrible. Pretty much 5 items in stock for mens - non-iron button down, selvage jeans, hooded sweatshirt, v neck sweater and v neck t-shirts. I'm gonna make the trek (it's not far but by bike it is) out to Chestnut Hill mall location. Shake Shack is also a great incentive to get out there.
So excited about the J+ collection. I really like the long hoodie in the Plokhov collab, I just hope it comes in gray.

Plokhov collab stuff looks interesting. When is the J+ line being re-issued?
post #99540 of 109053
re: the blurred line between editorial & advertising note--this seems like a straight up ad, and I can't imagine Joe Fresh didn't pay some money for it. there's no actual information in the piece, and nowhere is there an indication that it's sponsored content (unless I just missed it). there's the chance that it's an actual piece that wasn't paid for, but if so it's basically garbage journalism and shouldn't have been published anyway.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/10/joe-fresh-shopping_n_5793108.html?&ncid=tweetlnkushpmg00000067
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