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Random fashion thoughts - Page 6623  

post #99331 of 109053
Kind of tangentially related, Rachel Seville -- the blogger behind Pizza Rules -- had a good post today on the transformation of womenswear blogs (Seville's blog, incidentally, is one of the ones that I think is doing really good work now. Obviously a bit "industry driven," cause she works in the industry, but great to follow if you care about industry related stuff. It's clearly not being made cause Seville is being paid marketing dollars or whatever).

Anyway, the meat of her post:
Quote:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Blogging was once considered a “wild west,” where new voices and new ways of consuming and interacting with fashion could emerge. Blogging reinvented street style, it changed the way young talent breaks into the fashion industry (notably, though, this doesn’t hold water for designers), and it transformed the general public’s understanding of and access to the fashion industry. Can you imagine Alexander McQueen putting on his groundbreaking Spring 2001 VOSS show today? It would be Instagrammed, tweeted about, and blogged over to excess; your average sixteen-year-old girl would have an opinion on it.

In the latest issue of Texas Monthly, Francesca Mari profiles Amber Venz, the empress of the fashion industry’s most powerful affiliate site, RewardStyle. (Diclosure: I used RewardStyle in my personal style blogger days, which ended in 2013.) That bloggers are making bank is no big news (remember that WWD story earlier this summer), but it’s the corporatized aspect of the game that’s so shocking here. Looking through the bloggers interviewed, you find a slew of sites in which women are all wearing the same things, styled the same way. And these cash cows aren’t going to be plucked from obscurity and into the front row: the bloggers mentioned in WWD’s story are women you’ve never heard of and probably never will. Their already making $1m a year; what’s a seat at Dior?

Mari writes that bloggers are desperate for brand collaborations, and I think that’s led many bloggers to do what other, more successful bloggers are doing (down to the design and layout of their blogs, and the way they dress) so they look “legit” enough for a brand. They wear stuff they know readers will want to buy (Venz even recounts telling a blogger to dress “down” when the blogger’s sales mean she can starts buying higher end clothes). Times was, kiddos, bloggers wore newly discovered brands, or styled things in an unexpected way, or showed the same ole, perhaps, but with an engaging or surprising voice. That was what bloggers brought to the fashion industry, and the ones who did it well broke through.

Now, the fashion industry and its observers have clearly tired of blogging. I could count the number of “fashion blogs are dead” think pieces that have appeared in the last year on my hands and feet and have to borrow someone else’s hands and feet to finish counting. It doesn’t mean blogs are going away—in fact, I think there is a “masthead” of bloggers who are the “establishment,” and here to stay.

The original purpose of blogging—a kingmaker for the obscure and reasonably well-attired—is what’s dead. That is over. (She writes, on her fashion blog.) The craze for anyone who is wearing clothes on the internet is over. That no longer gives a brand legitimacy. You can’t just start a blog and get in anymore, and the type of bloggers discussed in Mari’s story (save for a few exceptions, who may have made money from RewardStyle but whose success isn’t driven by it, such as Into the Gloss and Man Repeller) are not exactly rolling in and disrupting the game. They’re all doing the same thing, and no amount of Marc Jacobs or Louis Vuitton collaborations, which RewardStyle says it has in the works, is going to change that. Here’s a blogging secret: the clothes don’t make the blogger. The blogger’s point of view does.

You can read the rest here.
post #99332 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Now at your local mall, Zara's gothninja collection:

http://www.zara.com/us/en/man/zara-dark-collection-c666501.html

hey that actually looks like a pretty good imitation.  

post #99333 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by brad-t View Post

That's cool. Some people will find it interesting, some won't. But that kind of content also provides funds to create other, more experimental content.

Can't funds come from conventional click advertising?
post #99334 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Kind of tangentially related, Rachel Seville -- the blogger behind Pizza Rules -- had a good post today on the transformation of womenswear blogs (Seville's blog, incidentally, is one of the ones that I think is doing really good work now. Obviously a bit "industry driven," cause she works in the industry, but great to follow if you care about industry related stuff. It's clearly not being made cause Seville is being paid marketing dollars or whatever).

Anyway, the meat of her post:
You can read the rest here.

While she writes well,  and I generally enjoy her stuff, I don't think that she says anything interesting in that piece.  It's the same harrumphing that's been going on for a long time now.  We saw the entire trajectory here.  I mean, when Styleforum was already established, Scot Shuman started posting here, and the critics were all "Argh, darn kids".  And it went straight from "darn kids" to "ugh, I'm sooooo over bloggers" in a single season.  Her punch line?  "News is the new news."  BAM.

 

I have been interested in the business of fashion as long as I've been even peripherally involved in the industry, and I can certainly see how "fashion news", meaning news about the fashion industry, will become more appealing to a specific audience, as the industry becomes less opaque to the general public.  But I think that that story is more about the general public's evolving understanding of the fashion industry, rather than "This is what comes after blogging."  If anything, the story that is being missed is that awareness of the workings of the fashion industry have come through the more developed forums, like Styleforum or The FashionSpot.  The reason is that the core purpose of forums is discussion, and "equal playing field" engagement, rather than to project a specific POV, and that the former format lends itself much better to news discussion (for better or worse, see our Current Events section), than a soapbox.  

 

Back on the subject of whether blogging is finished, I think that POV bloggers will stay, not because there is an audience, although having one helps, but because people want to project their POV, good or shitty, into the world.  Even if the overall audience decreases, the bloggers will continue, perhaps just with shifted expectations.  

post #99335 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

While she writes well,  and I generally enjoy her stuff, I don't think that she says anything interesting in that piece.  It's the same harrumphing that's been going on for a long time now.  We saw the entire trajectory here.  I mean, when Styleforum was already established, Scot Shuman started posting here, and the critics were all "Argh, darn kids".  And it went straight from "darn kids" to "ugh, I'm sooooo over bloggers" in a single season.  Her punch line?  "News is the new news."  BAM. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

I have been interested in the business of fashion as long as I've been even peripherally involved in the industry, and I can certainly see how "fashion news", meaning news about the fashion industry, will become more appealing to a specific audience, as the industry becomes less opaque to the general public.  But I think that that story is more about the general public's evolving understanding of the fashion industry, rather than "This is what comes after blogging."  If anything, the story that is being missed is that awareness of the workings of the fashion industry have come through the more developed forums, like Styleforum or The FashionSpot.  The reason is that the core purpose of forums is discussion, and "equal playing field" engagement, rather than to project a specific POV, and that the former format lends itself much better to news discussion (for better or worse, see our Current Events section), than a soapbox.  

Back on the subject of whether blogging is finished, I think that POV bloggers will stay, not because there is an audience, although having one helps, but because people want to project their POV, good or shitty, into the world.  Even if the overall audience decreases, the bloggers will continue, perhaps just with shifted expectations.  


Yea, I don't really buy the idea that news is the new news either. IMO, most people have fairly straightforward relations with clothes (and fashion). They just want to look good at the office and what not. But it is interesting that BoF has blown up so quickly. I get the impression that much of their readership are people who are not in the fashion industry.
post #99336 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

Can't funds come from conventional click advertising?

Some does.  But as we move towards a mobile world, conventional CPM and CPC display advertising becomes less and less lucrative.  Basically, people buy less using mobile than using a PC.  Content-base and other "native" advertising is higher paying because it is much more effective.  

 

I think that there are shitty, shortsighted ways of doing "native" advertising.  And I think that a lot of this is because the ideas come from the advertiser, rather than the publisher, side.  Advertisers, except those few that have a symbiotic relationship with a specific publisher, have no vested interested in the viability of a publisher, and especially blogs, which are, for the most part, replaceable and interchangeable.  And frankly, there are few publishers that have the ability and inclination to develop better, more sustainable, advertising products, and to bang their heads against walls selling them to advertisers, both big, and small.

post #99337 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Yea, I don't really buy the idea that news is the new news either. IMO, most people have fairly straightforward relations with clothes (and fashion). They just want to look good at the office and what not. But it is interesting that BoF has blown up so quickly. I get the impression that much of their readership are people who are not in the fashion industry.

I get the impression that much of their readership are people who are peripherally involved in the fashion industry, or would like to be involved in the industry.  And in the past few years, a lot of people get to fit into those categories, since the barrier for entry is now really, really, low.  imo, it's part of the same story into which bloggers fit, and at the center of it all is the internet.

post #99338 of 109053
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Edited by dieworkwear - 9/4/14 at 10:16pm
post #99339 of 109053
I just want to say that reviewing products in a way that they are not at all supposed to be used is a fantastic idea, and would allow you to be pretty much completely unbiased even if you got them for free. They still get some nice pictures of the product before, during and after the "test", and their name at the top of the page so some exposure, but the "review" should still be very fun to read if done well. (And then people can just chime in in the comments whether or not the brand is good for normal use or one's experience with it, maintaining an unbiased discussion)
post #99340 of 109053
How would you test clothing in a way they are not supposed to be used?

Will it blend, will it garden, will it mountaineer?




Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken P View Post

I don't think there's anything wrong with accept freebies and writing a review - as long as it can be an honest review. Personally I'd love to see a thread of @Teger reviewing the worst gimmicky #menswear bullshit that's out there like pocket square wallets. It could be a hall of shame of sorts.


Sort of look like a Hard Graft iPhone wallet wrapped in a pocket square.
post #99341 of 109053
I bought a couple red polos a while ago that look hella targety so i never wear them. Any way to bleach them pink or even a nice faded red? I've got bleach and a bucket.
post #99342 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

How would you test clothing in a way they are not supposed to be used?

http://www.styleforum.net/t/417019/using-trousers-to-make-a-vest-waistcoat/0_20#post_7354427
post #99343 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraphicNovelty View Post

I bought a couple red polos a while ago that look hella targety so i never wear them. Any way to bleach them pink or even a nice faded red? I've got bleach and a bucket.

don't wear polos
post #99344 of 109053
Peggs stocking Acronym for tech-fans: http://www.peggsandson.com/brands/acronym
post #99345 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by ManofKent View Post

Peggs stocking Acronym for tech-fans: http://www.peggsandson.com/brands/acronym

Are there any companies that are doing stuff like this, but with things like softshell, so that in addition to being acrasion resistant, they have incredible movement?  I know there are brands like Outlier are out there, but I was looking for something that was a little more in the style of Acronym or Veillance, a little more urban tech ninja.  The difference is that I actually want to use it to maybe do free running and go through the brush as well.  

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