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Random fashion thoughts - Page 6560

post #98386 of 99996
Quote:
Originally Posted by notwithit View Post

Somewhat fashion-related question: How do creative-type people get linked up with business partners?

Perhaps only tangentially related, but CBS recently had a story about fashion companies funding business incubators.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/at-nyc-fashion-lab-tech-startups-are-pointed-toward-success/

When I was in my early 20s, I started a tech company with some friends. We had investors, and those investors introduced us to other business partners. With fashion, the start up costs can be a lot more variable -- and I've seen people start lines through all sorts of avenues. At least in the past, the designers I knew who wanted to create a "brand" needed investors, and started much the same way I did. Wrote a biz plan, got investors, and those investors introduced us to their connections. It's as much about financing as it is about mentorship and networking.

Nowadays, however, you can obviously just do Kickstarter campaigns to raise half a million for a new clothing company. No idea how those people make their connections, but I imagine it's just through traditional networking.
post #98387 of 99996
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by notwithit View Post

Also the setting of a season 4 episode of Archer.



Somewhat fashion-related question: How do creative-type people get linked up with business partners?

Case in point:

My friend makes ceramics. She just had a successfully funded Kickstarter campaign for a line of ceramic jewelry, and she has a couple other lines of ceramics (household goods, decorative tiles) that she's sold at local craft fairs and through Etsy. Her work is good, but her business experience and expertise are lacking. She spends all her time in the studio, which leaves her with neither the bandwidth nor the savvy to do all of the promotion she needs to via Etsy, Pinterest, Facebook, &c. She had to basically abandon her Etsy during the Kickstarter campaign, and now that she's in production mode fulfilling jewelry orders, she's unlikely to pick it back up and running again until sometime this fall.

Surely there are people out there on the other end of the spectrum - people who know entrepreneurship, social marketing, business logistics, identifying direct-to-consumer and wholesale opportunities - but don't necessarily have a product to sell. How does one find such people? Sit outside of a business school graduation ceremony and ask everyone wearing a cap and gown what they majored in and whether they have a job? puzzled.gif

Let me know when you find out. (As someone that works for themselves and is pretty bad at all of these things)
post #98388 of 99996
@notwithit she could just make a craigslist ad. I'm on of "those people", and at least in New York, companies are inundated with candidates for those types of positions.
post #98389 of 99996
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Perhaps only tangentially related, but CBS recently had a story about fashion companies funding business incubators.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/at-nyc-fashion-lab-tech-startups-are-pointed-toward-success/

When I was in my early 20s, I started a tech company with some friends. We had investors, and those investors introduced us to other business partners. With fashion, the start up costs can be a lot more variable -- and I've seen people start lines through all sorts of avenues. At least in the past, the designers I knew who wanted to create a "brand" needed investors, and started much the same way I did. Wrote a biz plan, got investors, and those investors introduced us to their connections. It's as much about financing as it is about mentorship and networking.

Nowadays, however, you can obviously just do Kickstarter campaigns to raise half a million for a new clothing company. No idea how those people make their connections, but I imagine it's just through traditional networking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

Sounds like she needs an agent (most furniture brands/designers have one) or a PR bureau.

Quote:
Originally Posted by futuresailors View Post

@notwithit she could just make a craigslist ad. I'm on of "those people", and at least in New York, companies are inundated with candidates for those types of positions.

I'm trying to envision her response when I tell her this. laugh.gif

Anyway, thanks for the advice, y'all. Her opinion, which I more or less share, is that it's a little premature for a business loan because she doesn't have an actual business plan developed, but maybe it's worth tackling at this point.

The fundamental problem with Kickstarter is that it works best for people and companies who don't really need it. If you already have a significant social media presence, an established customer base, and channels through which to invest in promotion, it's easy to attain a relatively high level of visibility. Unfortunately, you can't start from ground zero on Kickstarter and expect it to blow its goal out of the water.
Quote:
Originally Posted by artishard116 View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Let me know when you find out. (As someone that works for themselves and is pretty bad at all of these things)

Definitely. cheers.gif
post #98390 of 99996
Quote:
Originally Posted by stafa View Post

i'm pretty sure he was just taking a shot at bro science

Didn't think it wad aimed at me!!!

I eat 3 cooked meals a day, because I have malabsorption, and I don't think anybody would consider 84 pounds overweight!smile.gifbiggrin.gif:D
post #98391 of 99996

^ ceramics friend:

 

have her set up a linked in account , listing her company and her skills.  have her connect with a few friends and set up a "network" there.  eventually a name will pop up that might help her.

post #98392 of 99996
Quote:
Originally Posted by notwithit View Post



I'm trying to envision her response when I tell her this. laugh.gif
laugh.gif I meant the other type of craigslist ad; they've got a dedicated marketing section. And she could even look for an intern if she has a limited budget.

If she has more time there's more specialized sites for job postings (ie: there's one specifically for fashion marketing jobs).
post #98393 of 99996
Yup the startup I was at abused the hell out of Stanford/Berkeley/Ivy unpaid interns who were happy to do social media/brand awareness stuff part time just for the experience. (As well as cold calling, sales, operations and account management and design work).

A lot of really talented college kids live in fear of the job search process and so internships, even unpaid, doing tech-stuff is really attractive and a lot of them are very tech-savy (naturally). Imo should pay them though after they've ramped up and demonstrated value through, but we were broke I guess.
post #98394 of 99996
Notwithit, Maybe she could join some type of online ceramacist community.
I've met a bunch of ppl thanks to StyleForum icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #98395 of 99996
@bows1 @Tirailleur1 You may be interested in this.
post #98396 of 99996
@notwithit Something your friend may need to think about is scalability. If your friend is so busy on the production side that she isn't able to maintain her etsy page AND the sale of all her goods at that work rate generates, let's say $50k a year in revenue, then she has a problem. It won't really matter how big her presence gets, she won't have the capacity to meet the demand.

Does she have ability to contract out some of this work? Are all her pieces crafted by her personally?

Look at somebody like @artishard116, he comes up with a design, sends it off to the manufacturer, and it doesn't really matter if he needs 1 shirt or 100. The manufacturer will be able to acommodate his request with ease. So art is free to spend his time creating his next great design and/or building his brand presence.
post #98397 of 99996
post #98398 of 99996
Quote:
Originally Posted by ManofKent View Post

New challenge here: http://www.styleforum.net/t/406892/sw-d-challenge-floral-fun-8-2-14-8-16-14

I'll probably jump on this when I get back to the city and have access to my floral.
post #98399 of 99996
You just have to whore and hype your product, give a lot of samples away. Be on the phone all the time to potential stores, keep at it.
post #98400 of 99996
You can sell anything as long as you are passionate about your product and won't take no for an answer
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