or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Random fashion thoughts
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Random fashion thoughts - Page 5853  

post #87781 of 109053

@cyc: Downtown, which was largely (exclusively?) womenswear shut down their retail store, but I think they're also responsible for Vitamori, which seems to be doing quite well. I'd be willing to bet Archive picking up a lot of lower priced brands has something to do with them continuing to operate; look at their stock now compared to two or three years ago and there's now a much wider range of pricepoints.

post #87782 of 109053
^^blocked cheers.gif

sorry toasty i hope the package turn up.
post #87783 of 109053
^I was thinking about Downtown...oops

And to continue with our previous conversation, this was an interesting read so far

http://www.businessoffashion.com/2013/11/singularity-university-eu-summit-science-fiction-is-swiftly-becoming-fact-and-set-to-vaporise-entire-industries.html
Quote:
What this means for the future of the physical store, and the shopping streets and malls that house them, remains to be seen. For one thing, immediacy will be much less of a reason to visit stores than it is today.
Quote:
This already makes it possible for companies to digitally design and manufacture the kind of “synthetic life” that could one day be harnessed to “grow” things like self-repairing, self-cleaning garments and accessories that can reproduce themselves and receive updates (new colours, patterns and materials, for example) much like software updates on a mobile device.

sweet, going to download a new sweater
post #87784 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bam!ChairDance View Post


What would you say were some of the bigger mistakes? The lack of an online checkout comes immediately to mind

Well, in a B&M store, you can handle the goods.  Service is to allow you space to do so while educating you about the garment and the designer should you want it.  Online, a retailer has to be the eyes and hands of the consumer.  You should be able to provide measurements, notes about the hand and weight of the materials, pictures of internal construction, etc...  Most importantly, you have to be able to tell a customer how it is likely to fit him or her.  That is the fantasy you have to be able to create.  This is the best use of the chat features of online stores.  

 

More importantly, service is synonymous with convenience online.  At very least, you need an online checkout.  You don't have one, and you immediately lose customers.  You need to be open 24/7.  And most stores that offer goods of that caliber offer free and fast shipping, *and* returns.  

 

Also, if you notice, the most successful online stores do not follow a seasonal model.  There are continual drops to keep the customer engaged. Mr Porter does this every week.  Yoox is constantly updating.  Other stores continually repackage things to make them seem new.  You need to buy shallow and buy breadth.  In a store, if you have 500 SKUs, it seems like your store is packed.  Online, that is scrolling through a mere 5 pages.  I see what you have in 5 minutes, and decide that I won't visit your site again for 3 months, when you might mark down something.  You need ways to make me revisit your site.  New product is the best way to do that.  Put the new product up in combinations with older product I may have skipped?  You may have made a sale.  Also, if I can see that something is never selling out, I feel no pressure to buy.  So, buying shallow creates the sense of "buy now, or never get this."  One good reason to keep sold out merchandise on your website ("Oh, look at all the cool stuff you missed out on.  What else will you miss out on if you don't buy now?"

 

Finally, you need to either compete on price, or have truly exclusive product.  There is a reason that the MTM business is booming.  It's exclusive product, and you hold no inventory, in many business models.  Atelier held tons of inventory, and most of the goods, you can get elsewhere, at a lower price.  Hard to compete when you have no advantages.  

 

Ultimately, to be successful at business, you have to be at business, which means making good calls and smart gambles.  From everything I've read about Karlo Steel, he really had great knowledge of fashion.  But it just seems like that crew didn't even bother to gain the knowledge needed to make a real run at the competition in 2013.

post #87785 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isachenko View Post
 

toasty,

 

You're kidding, what fucking high end retailer uses UPS?

 

Just realized my Peter Millar coat was just sent UPS. :embar:  (In my defense Neiman was in the ghetto category for me.)

Really? 

 

Lessee: Barneys, Saks, MrPorter, every single fucking boutique in the USA that is not essentially a mom-and-pop store?

post #87786 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post
 

Really? 

 

Lessee: Barneys, Saks, MrPorter, every single fucking boutique in the USA that is not essentially a mom-and-pop store?

 

Well, I'm sure everything's insured so they don't really care if a UPS truck drives over a package. Ironically, excluding express Fedex shipments USPS is the safest method but nobody offers it. 

post #87787 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isachenko View Post
 

 

Well, I'm sure everything's insured so they don't really care if a UPS truck drives over a package. Ironically, excluding express Fedex shipments USPS is the safest method but nobody offers it. 

That's probably not true.  The numbers are obviously not published, but you can get an upper bound on these numbers by looking at the relative prices for insuring packages, assuming that markup is the same.  Using this estimate, USPS is at about 1% loss rate, and UPS and Fedex are about 1/2 of that.

post #87788 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urthwhyte View Post
 

@cyc: Downtown, which was largely (exclusively?) womenswear shut down their retail store, but I think they're also responsible for Vitamori, which seems to be doing quite well. I'd be willing to bet Archive picking up a lot of lower priced brands has something to do with them continuing to operate; look at their stock now compared to two or three years ago and there's now a much wider range of pricepoints.

fwiw, The Archive has always had things at more accessible pricepoints.  They used to stock a lot of Nice Collective, for example.

post #87789 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isachenko View Post
 

 

gdl just posted in recent purchases about how the Japanese don't gouge their buyers in relation to the states. Difference being I doubt Buttero will be offering 70% off these burgundies ever, which would decrease the mark-up over retail to 'just' 40%.

This is a clear misunderstanding of the Japanese vs. American business model.  You know why the effective Japanese "markup" is closer to 1.8x "wholesale", as opposed to the 2.3x wholesale that is typical in the US?  Because Japanese shoppers are more likely to buy at retail, and to buy more.  Somehow, your 50% off sales have to be paid for.

post #87790 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post
 

That's probably not true.  The numbers are obviously not published, but you can get an upper bound on these numbers by looking at the relative prices for insuring packages, assuming that markup is the same.  Using this estimate, USPS is at about 1% loss rate, and UPS and Fedex are about 1/2 of that.

 

Markup's definitely not the same then. I take back what I said about Fedex express as well. USPS is the best method, and I've shipped and received thousands of packages all over the world. My theory is that UPS and Fedex being low hourly employees don't really care about doing a good job, or losing their job, unlike salaried USPS employees. My experience is shared by others as well, USPS is also by far the cheapest way to mail even with the dramatic price increases over the past year.

post #87791 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post
 

Well, in a B&M store, you can handle the goods.  Service is to allow you space to do so while educating you about the garment and the designer should you want it.  Online, a retailer has to be the eyes and hands of the consumer.  You should be able to provide measurements, notes about the hand and weight of the materials, pictures of internal construction, etc...  Most importantly, you have to be able to tell a customer how it is likely to fit him or her.  That is the fantasy you have to be able to create.  This is the best use of the chat features of online stores.  

 

More importantly, service is synonymous with convenience online.  At very least, you need an online checkout.  You don't have one, and you immediately lose customers.  You need to be open 24/7.  And most stores that offer goods of that caliber offer free and fast shipping, *and* returns.  

 

Also, if you notice, the most successful online stores do not follow a seasonal model.  There are continual drops to keep the customer engaged. Mr Porter does this every week.  Yoox is constantly updating.  Other stores continually repackage things to make them seem new.  You need to buy shallow and buy breadth.  In a store, if you have 500 SKUs, it seems like your store is packed.  Online, that is scrolling through a mere 5 pages.  I see what you have in 5 minutes, and decide that I won't visit your site again for 3 months, when you might mark down something.  You need ways to make me revisit your site.  New product is the best way to do that.  Put the new product up in combinations with older product I may have skipped?  You may have made a sale.  Also, if I can see that something is never selling out, I feel no pressure to buy.  So, buying shallow creates the sense of "buy now, or never get this."  One good reason to keep sold out merchandise on your website ("Oh, look at all the cool stuff you missed out on.  What else will you miss out on if you don't buy now?"

 

Finally, you need to either compete on price, or have truly exclusive product.  There is a reason that the MTM business is booming.  It's exclusive product, and you hold no inventory, in many business models.  Atelier held tons of inventory, and most of the goods, you can get elsewhere, at a lower price.  Hard to compete when you have no advantages.  

 

Ultimately, to be successful at business, you have to be at business, which means making good calls and smart gambles.  From everything I've read about Karlo Steel, he really had great knowledge of fashion.  But it just seems like that crew didn't even bother to gain the knowledge needed to make a real run at the competition in 2013.

Very informative analysis. Thank you. Many of these things have often popped up in my head as successful marketing tactics, but I've never truly sat down and thought about what makes the businesses that I shop at continue to receive my business. A vast selection, free shipping and returns, and (obviously) competitive prices are generally at the top of my list of importance.

 

Generally speaking, exploiting the element of scarcity could possibly be a double-edged sword. If it's mutually implied, then it will always work. Higher end websites, which I'm assuming you're referring to, can achieve this without fail because there is no asymmetric information between the seller and the buyer (wealthy, stylish people know that what they want is limited, and the store owners know that their clientele understand this to be true), but many of the volume-selling upper-middle-level clothing sites cannot communicate this effectively because there is some pretty severe informational asymmetry between what the seller knows and what the buyer knows. I would be willing to argue that someone who is looking for a new, limited-edition pair of Pure Blue Japan jeans from a website like Blue in Green, for example, is probably more aware of scarcity than the average guy buying a pair of Diesel Zathan 1029138ZZAs from a site like Revolve Clothing (which has a large variance in terms of the quality of their items). A site that doesn't cater to the most knowledgeable consumer doesn't have the implied recognition of scarcity, and their options to solve that problem are less obvious (to me at least). I think that what Revolve does, which is to warn you when only one of your item is left in stock, is probably close to the best that places like that can do. After all, outright listing your inventory stock can work against you in a variety of ways, particularly within one standard deviation of the mean of the sizing standard normal distribution. They could see the "10+ in stock" sign, and simply say "...maybe later, when it goes on sale."

Then again, that might give people on the tails of the distribution (XS, XL+) additional incentive to buy because they'll see that their desired item is getting sold faster at the tails, and the people in the middle of the distribution could view it as a sign to buy. It's not always easy to predict how something like that could go. Of course, none of this applies to the highest quality stores, but I'm talking generally.

 

Those are just my random thoughts, as an economist in training with no business experience outside of the banking industry.

post #87792 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isachenko View Post
 

 

Markup's definitely not the same then. I take back what I said about Fedex express as well. USPS is the best method, and I've shipped and received thousands of packages all over the world. My theory is that UPS and Fedex being low hourly employees don't really care about doing a good job, or losing their job, unlike salaried USPS employees. My experience is shared by others as well, USPS is also by far the cheapest way to mail even with the dramatic price increases over the past year.

I think you have this completely backward, sir. UPS employees earn quite a solid salary, and FedEx workers aren't exactly starving. In addition, their companies are accountable to their clients in order to ensure to ensure their survival, whereas the Postal Service has very little accountability, and their existence is virtually guaranteed.

post #87793 of 109053
kc0X8t

Thank god for jungle beaver fever, none of this halfway wannabe shit. Another thread here made me think, since I have to buy everything online basically, I hardly spend money on clothes and it takes a backseat to other vices and hobbies.

post #87794 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bam!ChairDance View Post


there are lots of ways to sustain an interest in fashion without buying stuff, though, no?

Perhaps, I keep following certain threads such as baller footwear occasionally. Unsubscribed most of the retailers for a long time ago... Mr. Porter was the worst.

post #87795 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Well, in a B&M store, you can handle the goods.  Service is to allow you space to do so while educating you about the garment and the designer should you want it.  Online, a retailer has to be the eyes and hands of the consumer.  You should be able to provide measurements, notes about the hand and weight of the materials, pictures of internal construction, etc...  Most importantly, you have to be able to tell a customer how it is likely to fit him or her.  That is the fantasy you have to be able to create.  This is the best use of the chat features of online stores.  

More importantly, service is synonymous with convenience online.  At very least, you need an online checkout.  You don't have one, and you immediately lose customers.  You need to be open 24/7.  And most stores that offer goods of that caliber offer free and fast shipping, *and* returns.  

Also, if you notice, the most successful online stores do not follow a seasonal model.  There are continual drops to keep the customer engaged. Mr Porter does this every week.  Yoox is constantly updating.  Other stores continually repackage things to make them seem new.  You need to buy shallow and buy breadth.  In a store, if you have 500 SKUs, it seems like your store is packed.  Online, that is scrolling through a mere 5 pages.  I see what you have in 5 minutes, and decide that I won't visit your site again for 3 months, when you might mark down something.  You need ways to make me revisit your site.  New product is the best way to do that.  Put the new product up in combinations with older product I may have skipped?  You may have made a sale.  Also, if I can see that something is never selling out, I feel no pressure to buy.  So, buying shallow creates the sense of "buy now, or never get this."  One good reason to keep sold out merchandise on your website ("Oh, look at all the cool stuff you missed out on.  What else will you miss out on if you don't buy now?" Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Finally, you need to either compete on price, or have truly exclusive product.  There is a reason that the MTM business is booming.  It's exclusive product, and you hold no inventory, in many business models.  Atelier held tons of inventory, and most of the goods, you can get elsewhere, at a lower price.  Hard to compete when you have no advantages.  

Ultimately, to be successful at business, you have to be at business, which means making good calls and smart gambles.  From everything I've read about Karlo Steel, he really had great knowledge of fashion.  But it just seems like that crew didn't even bother to gain the knowledge needed to make a real run at the competition in 2013.

This is incredibly annoying. Especially if you have to click through to the item page to see that it's sold out.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Streetwear and Denim
This thread is locked  
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Random fashion thoughts