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Random fashion thoughts - Page 5594

post #83896 of 99157
It isn't *that* rainy in London right now.
post #83897 of 99157
That's the inside of your forearm, right, thewho? Mind sharing the story/idea behind the tattoo?
post #83898 of 99157
Quote:
Originally Posted by thewho13 View Post

Speaking of segue ways:

PfWulv1.jpg?1

It's afl!
post #83899 of 99157
Kafka on the Shore? (!)
post #83900 of 99157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Moo View Post

I, too, am looking for advice.

Heading to France for a couple of weeks, and need to make sure I have good walking shoes. None of my dress shoes or boots have been used for all day walking, so I am hesitant to rely on them for such activities 6000 miles from home. My regular errand/all day shoes at home are an old pair of Brooks running shoes, but they aren't really stylish (vomit) enough.

I am thinking... Flyknits in black/white? Will try those on tonight at Nordstrom.

Any other ideas?

MMM GATs (if you already own a pair). Not really suggesting you plunk down $400 for pair of vacation shoes. Took them on vacation recently and they did great on a couple of shortish trail hikes that we did plus normal day to day wear.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synthese View Post

Moo, I wandered around the Languedoc a month or two ago in my flyknits and they were great for what I was doing (hiking, exploring, playing with wild boars (0)). They're really packable too, if you get the original one that doesn't have the lunar sole. Also, being totally serious - back when I wore Clarks DB's, I logged some serious miles in those things and always found them really comfortable. They'd be perfect for the temperature this time of year, too. You can wear with shorts or jeans. I always found them a useful shoe to have around, for whatever reason.

I have high arches and found them to be incompatible with shoes like Clark DBs. I'd say the same thing about CPs.
post #83901 of 99157

If you walk a lot already, it doesn't matter what kind of shoes you're wearing.  I walked all over europe in a pair of three-year-old Diesel GATs full of holes.

 

If you live in the suburbs and drive to work every day, it also doesn't matter what you're wearing, because your feet will hurt regardless.  Either way, just bring whatever.

post #83902 of 99157
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingJulien View Post

If you walk a lot already, it doesn't matter what kind of shoes you're wearing.  I walked all over europe in a pair of three-year-old Diesel GATs full of holes.

If you live in the suburbs and drive to work every day, it also doesn't matter what you're wearing, because your feet will hurt regardless.  Either way, just bring whatever.

For the most part, I don't disagree with you. That said, you can certainly do yourself a favor and get shoes that accommodate the features of your feet. Walking a lot in shoes w/o a lot of arch support can be a great way to develop plantar fasciitis.
post #83903 of 99157
I travel a fair bit, and I walk a lot. I have fallen arches, so my situation is different from Moo's. That said, I think that there are a few important things to keep in mind.

1) Your shoes need to be lightweight. Even the most comfortable shoes, if they are heavy, will make your feet feel like lead in no time flat. For that reason, I wear sneakers all the time. Flyknits are popular, but they really only work if you have a really good handle on real streetwear, or they often just look awkward.

2) I find that if you are walking a lot, lowtops, midtops, and chukkas are a lot more comfortable than hightops. The only thing I wear longer boots for, for travel, are real hikes, and it doesn't seem that you are going to be doing anything that will require that you to have ankle support. Chukka/sneakers will also get you into nearly all but the most anal places.

3) You need more than one pair. After a day of wearing one pair of shoes, your feet can really stand a change to avoid getting sore and achy. Rotating 2 pairs, even if they are the same model, works well.

My walk around shoes are a Buttero chukka sneakers and some Common Projects captoe lows or the old Achilles based captoes. If you need additional support, fit them with a pair of orthodics.
post #83904 of 99157

Also keep in mind that unless you have knee issues or are walking on really rough terrain, "support" and padding is generally going to do more harm than good.  Our feet weren't really designed to be covered in padding.

post #83905 of 99157
Thanks guys. No issues with anything... I jog in my Brooks, so they would be fine for the walking, but I want something more stylish. Maybe I'll just stick to the Brooks and my Vass.
post #83906 of 99157
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingJulien View Post
 

Also keep in mind that unless you have knee issues or are walking on really rough terrain, "support" and padding is generally going to do more harm than good.  Our feet weren't really designed to be covered in padding.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appeal_to_nature

post #83907 of 99157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Distorbiant View Post
 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appeal_to_nature

 

That fallacy really doesn't apply to biology.  You can apply the same evolutionary adaptiveness principles to all sorts of things, such as food (i.e. people everywhere eating traditional meals are overwhelmingly healthier than those eating a industrialized Western diet, leading to the conclusion that "natural" diets and whole foods are better, at least until we can figure out why), sleep patterns, even weight training (barbell training is far more effective than machine training because it runs the body through its most "natural" range of motion).

 

Heavily-padded shoes absorb shock from impact.  Barefoot, that shock would be distributed throughout the leg, and primarily absorbed by the knee, so if you have knee issues the padding is a good thing.  For a lot of people, though, the padding can also screw up your gait when running or walking (if you heel-strike while running, a pretty easily solution is to switch to a shoe like the Free or go barefoot) and prevents a lot of the smaller stabilizer muscles in the foot from doing much of anything.

 

I'm not really saying that everyone should go without shoes, just to be careful of those running shoes with like an inch of padding.  Just because it feels squishy and comfy standing still in the store doesn't mean it's better for you.

 

Edit: I'm also totally biased because I studied evolutionary anthropology as one of my majors in undergrad.

post #83908 of 99157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synthese View Post

Moo, I wandered around the Languedoc a month or two ago in my flyknits and they were great for what I was doing (hiking, exploring, playing with wild boars (0)). They're really packable too, if you get the original one that doesn't have the lunar sole. Also, being totally serious - back when I wore Clarks DB's, I logged some serious miles in those things and always found them really comfortable. They'd be perfect for the temperature this time of year, too. You can wear with shorts or jeans. I always found them a useful shoe to have around, for whatever reason.

 

I'm glad you brought up Clarks DB, and in this context too. I've been thinking about them recently (never owned a pair) on the basis that they might be the best warm-weather travel shoe. I like to pack light, so if I can get away with only bringing one pair of shoes (and maybe sandals or espadrilles for the beach/pool), that's what I want to do. Thinking about Costa Rica, some Clarks DB in suede would have been perfect, I suppose except for the part when it rained. But they're not that expensive, so if they get a bit beaten up (or stolen in Ibiza, or whatever), it wouldn't be a big deal; I wouldn't be ruining a pair of Aldens (which I also considered -- the suede chukka). Also the crepe sole is probably better for stomping around third world country terrain than an Alden leather sole anyway.

 

My alternatives would be the MMM GATs and CPs I already have. The CPs are pretty good for a day's worth of walking but the MMMs, while more comfortable initially, don't hold up all day long.

 

Talk me out of it? I know Clarks DB were really popular on the forum sometime around 2008 and have largely fallen out of favor since, and they're "imperialist rapist boots" and whatever, but I think they probably fit with the rest of what I wear and might just be the most versatile shoe for my warm-weather vacationing.

post #83909 of 99157

what'd be considered a good deal on cp mids? sz 39 / white, if that matters.

post #83910 of 99157
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingJulien View Post
 

 

That fallacy really doesn't apply to biology.  You can apply the same evolutionary adaptiveness principles to all sorts of things, such as food (i.e. people everywhere eating traditional meals are overwhelmingly healthier than those eating a industrialized Western diet, leading to the conclusion that "natural" diets and whole foods are better, at least until we can figure out why), sleep patterns, even weight training (barbell training is far more effective than machine training because it runs the body through its most "natural" range of motion).

 

Heavily-padded shoes absorb shock from impact.  Barefoot, that shock would be distributed throughout the leg, and primarily absorbed by the knee, so if you have knee issues the padding is a good thing.  For a lot of people, though, the padding can also screw up your gait when running or walking (if you heel-strike while running, a pretty easily solution is to switch to a shoe like the Free or go barefoot) and prevents a lot of the smaller stabilizer muscles in the foot from doing much of anything.

 

I'm not really saying that everyone should go without shoes, just to be careful of those running shoes with like an inch of padding.  Just because it feels squishy and comfy standing still in the store doesn't mean it's better for you.

 

Edit: I'm also totally biased because I studied evolutionary anthropology as one of my majors in undergrad.

 

It's not entirely well founded.  I'm not saying it's not true (we don't know), but it's also not known really that wearing a lot of padding really does harm.  It's a hypothesis, there is some evidence to support it, but the strength of this evidence so far isn't impressive to me.

 

Further unfounded and opinionated corollary: when we're looking at something like clothing, we should be devaluing use based on what a garment takes away, lest we all wear cargo shorts out of comfort, storage space, breathability, etc. because other items are inferior.

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