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Random fashion thoughts - Page 4976

post #74626 of 99937
Quote:
Originally Posted by TWorksheets View Post

(10)?

Yes
post #74627 of 99937

Synth = TB 3. The oxfords are really nice quality. So are the BBBF versions for that matter. I wear size 1 and am 38 chest / 15.5 neck.

 

post #74628 of 99937
synth I think you're gonna be a TB 4. TB is surprisingly narrow in the shoulders/chest.
post #74629 of 99937
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synthese View Post

uh, can someone, um, tell me how thom browne shirting runs? 41" chest/18.5" shoulder...3 or 4?

/embarrassment

In other news, I have so much shit to sell. time to purge.

Thom Browne 3 is like 21.75 chest and 17.75-18.25 shoulder so you'd probably be a 4, black fleece sounds like it'd fit you a little better though
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadesofbeige View Post





Any other Jay Electronica fans in here? Hoping his full-length finally materializes this year
Hoping the same, probably my two favorite songs

The western world is just a hive of scum and villainy (star wars ftw)
and the classic
post #74630 of 99937
black fleece sucks. it's not slim at all, don't bother. was also VERY unimpressed with the quality/stitching. it's also cut very long --- can't really wear it untucked.
post #74631 of 99937
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post

black fleece sucks. it's not slim at all, don't bother. was also VERY unimpressed with the quality/stitching. it's also cut very long --- can't really wear it untucked.

Depends on the season man, earlier stuff is super nice. I don't own any black fleece anymore though other than the caruso suiting, though I do regret selling a few of the earlier oxfords. And in my experience length is the same on both my BB2 and TB3 stuff

I only have Gitman Vintage and Thom Browne for shirting now, with one RRL work shirt and one Uniqlo oxford I'm trying out now
post #74632 of 99937
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevent View Post

Depends on the season man, earlier stuff is super nice. I don't own any black fleece anymore though other than the caruso suiting, though I do regret selling a few of the earlier oxfords. And in my experience length is the same on both my BB2 and TB3 stuff

I only have Gitman Vintage and Thom Browne for shirting now, with one RRL work shirt and one Uniqlo oxford I'm trying out now

black fleece hasn't been cut well for like.. 4 years? it was good the first two seasons, but then they slashed the prices on everything to make it more appealing, and the fit went to shit. the suiting used to be beautiful - made in italy, a ton of handwork, no shoulder padding. it's just very unimpressive now. sad.
post #74633 of 99937
saw a hasidic woman on the train who looked straight out of an Ann D. show. long black coat, black preacher hat. looked good, actually.
post #74634 of 99937
Quote:
Originally Posted by pickpackpockpuck View Post

saw a hasidic woman on the train who looked straight out of an Ann D. show. long black coat, black preacher hat. looked good, actually.

used to play super early soccer pickup around 7am in prospect park with a group, one of them was a hasidic lady who was pretty good but the trickiest part was the long skirt that would hide the ball and nobody knew she had it till she would fire off a shot !
post #74635 of 99937
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bam!ChairDance View Post

Yeah the model hasn't really been attempted by high-end designers, so I have yet to see how they'd build a brand without the backing of retailers.

I'm pretty confident it's a sustainable model, though. Men's fashion isn't about projecting wealth the way it perhaps used to be, so charging "honest" or "modest" prices instead of the usual markups won't hurt the brand if the company tells its story the right way.

And since the number of menswear tastemakers on the internet is staggering, the path a newer designer would take to garner support would be very similar to the strategy taken by a fledgling blogger or musician-- partner with folks who already have established audiences, such as your magazines, tumblr authorities, all that stuff.

Like, the only thing lost would be the prestige that trickles down from a retailer's backing, as well as the ability to be seen by a passersby who just happened to spy your supercool jacket alongside many others.

But I'm not so sure any designer needs to depend on those two sources of awareness to succeed... dunno

Cutting down all the web 2.0 crap, all you are saying is that designers should sell their wares themselves and not go through stores or chains. The problem is that many brands already do that through their websites and more importantly their own stores (while still maintaining a relationship w. independent stores and chains like Barneys) . In other words, if you want to go with that model and really cut costs you have to go full retard and not do business through physical stores (even your own), which defeats the purpose when buying something for aesthetic reasons that has to match with your morphology.
post #74636 of 99937
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post

Cutting down all the web 2.0 crap, all you are saying is that designers should sell their wares themselves and not go through stores or chains. The problem is that many brands already do that through their websites and more importantly their own stores (while still maintaining a relationship w. independent stores and chains like Barneys) . In other words, if you want to go with that model and really cut costs you have to go full retard and not do business through physical stores (even your own), which defeats the purpose when buying something for aesthetic reasons that has to match with your morphology.

Yeah, your first point, that a direct-to-us model is impossible without severing any connection to physical retailers, has already been raised twice. And I totally agree.

But your second point, that online-only retailing is self defeating, is kind of bullshit. Plenty of companies have already proven that good info, good pictures, and a sick return policy more than make up for the lack of a physical fitting room.

Now, if you're talking about designers whose clientele craves that in-store experience, who values the means of buying clothing in a physical store just as much as the clothes themselves, then yes, it would be dumb to expect those designers to alienate their current fanbase by switching to an all-digital model.

But that's not the only customer in menswear. There is definitely a market for the sort of model I'm describing.
post #74637 of 99937
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bam!ChairDance View Post

Yeah, your first point, that a direct-to-us model is impossible without severing any connection to physical retailers, has already been raised twice. And I totally agree.

But your second point, that online-only retailing is self defeating, is kind of bullshit. Plenty of companies have already proven that good info, good pictures, and a sick return policy more than make up for the lack of a physical fitting room.

Now, if you're talking about designers whose clientele craves that in-store experience, who values the means of buying clothing in a physical store just as much as the clothes themselves, then yes, it would be dumb to expect those designers to alienate their current fanbase by switching to an all-digital model.

But that's not the only customer in menswear. There is totally a market for the sort of model I'm describing.

his point is that for brands at a certain price level, having physical stores, just like having a runway show, is part of the brand cache and is required. everlane and co. work (and the jury is still out if they do) because they're selling nondescript interchangeable basics.
post #74638 of 99937
That's pretty much my frustration with the model right now-- it's ruled by companies with really really boring aesthetics

But nothing in branding is "required." Folks can always swoop in and tell their stories in dramatically different ways than their competitors (use your imagination!)
post #74639 of 99937
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bam!ChairDance View Post

Yeah, your first point, that a direct-to-us model is impossible without severing any connection to physical retailers, has already been raised twice. And I totally agree.

But your second point, that online-only retailing is self defeating, is kind of bullshit. Plenty of companies have already proven that good info, good pictures, and a sick return policy more than make up for the lack of a physical fitting room.

Now, if you're talking about designers whose clientele craves that in-store experience, who values the means of buying clothing in a physical store just as much as the clothes themselves, then yes, it would be dumb to expect those designers to alienate their current fanbase by switching to an all-digital model.

But that's not the only customer in menswear. There is definitely a market for the sort of model I'm describing.

My point is that for a brand to be successful at a certain level, some people, somewhere are going to have to have access to the physical clothing and having 5 "tastemakers" is not enough. Now if you open one brand store what do you do, charge more to shop there? Maybe brands will end up reducing their costs by having less physical stores and retailers but 1) that'd be a bad thing and 2) They wouldn't pass on the savings to you.
post #74640 of 99937
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bam!ChairDance View Post

That's pretty much my frustration with the model right now-- it's ruled by companies with really really boring aesthetics

But nothing in branding is "required." Folks can always swoop in and tell their stories in dramatically different ways than their competitors (use your imagination!)

good luck. i think a big reason everlane is able to over their clothing so cheap is because there's very little design involved. how much money are they spending on patterning? how many unproduced samples do they have? having original designs is a lot riskier too -- both from a production standpoint, ie: it's hard to pick out nice fabrics, you have to trust your producers with complicated patterns, and from a sales standpoint -- bigger chance nobody is going to buy the product.
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