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Random fashion thoughts - Page 4179  

post #62671 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by smashwindow View Post

In 2004 I  moved to spain donned just beiber hair and became a "pijo" wearing "el Niño" tshirts and "Fumarel" rugby shirts 3 sizes to small with light zara jeans slit at the bottom and puma speed cat sneakers this was my rock bottom.

Pijos:

notice that the pijo male and female don the same apparel. [edit: and yes male midriff was a "thing"]




Ahaha I forgot about slit pants. Still can't believe people did that.
post #62672 of 109053

tcwalter07 

"one look at dis muthafucka n u can c he born in da trap cant break a niggas jaw if he dont have one"

 

 

Im dying

post #62673 of 109053


Me in high school.


J Crew and Levis "Strummer" No vis white sperrys.
post #62674 of 109053
Damn son you was huge.
post #62675 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noctone View Post

Damn son you was huge.

Naw just a cheap, tiny hotel room. 1'm barely 5'11 in the right shoes.
post #62676 of 109053
I usually just wore like black jeans with a black Bad Brains or Black Flag or whatever band shirt. Shoes were usually Vans or Converse or something.

In some ways, what I wear has changed very, very little.
post #62677 of 109053

 

 

Anyone want some sexy neck lumber?

post #62678 of 109053
Pretty funny rant about why I shop online on hapsical blog
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Just a quick post that I wrote on my phone in the doctor's waiting room earlier this evening...so nu media, 2012, etc.

To kill time before my appointment, I just did a quick whip around the Selfridges menswear department for the first time in about a year. Don't get me wrong, I think Selfridges is a fine store, great for many things (especially for buying obscure zeitgeist-y European fashion magazines full of tits / cocks and not many clothes) but I just remembered why I buy 90% of my clothes online - and I SWEAR I'm not just saying this because I work for MR P. Here's why:

1) High-end retail staff – snooty old queens who were probably very effective at selling Gianfranco Ferre nehru-collar jackets or whatever in the early 90s but have now slightly lost the plot. The bitchiness I can just about deal with (by in my head delivering the immortal Absolutely Fabulous line which Eddy uses on a haughty gallery assistant: "you only work in a shop you know, you can drop the attitude"). But the phoniness really gets me. I'm standing there, dressed in minimal all black, holding out this multi-coloured silk Versace shirt, honestly just to get a proper look at how hideous it is, no doubt with a crumpled facial expression of horror to match, when an assistant saunters over and says "that shirt is JUST fabulous, isn't it? I saw it caught your eye, well it caught mine too, and I think it'd look great on you" Er, hello? Do I look by any stretch of the imagination like a turquoise and fuchsia Medusa-head pattern kind of guy? Which brings me to…


Gareth Pugh to the left, Versace to the right. Swarovski-crysal studded leather jacket with a £4,500 price tag top of my winter musn't-have list.

2) Stock horror – When you're shopping online you can easily filter out all the crap that you don't want to see, but when you have to sift through it in the store it weighs on the mind and reminds you what you hate about fashion. Givenchy, for example, selling a plain black nylon MA-1 bomber jacket, identical except for its plaid lining to one you which would find in an army surplus store for £30, for north of £1000. Balmain printed T-shirts which look like rejects from Superdry priced at £300, etc. etc. Merchandising malfunctions are avoided online too. In fairness to Selfridges, they have finally moved Ann Demeulemeesteer from ‘contemporary’ (beside J. Lindeberg and Stone Island) to ‘designer’ – something which used to gall me way more than it should have done – but other stores are still guilty of placement mishaps. The last time I went to Harrods, DRKSHDW Rick Owens was next to Just Cavalli, presumably based on the twisted logic that since they’re both ‘bridge’ lines they make excellent bedfellows.

3) Fellow Customers – Other than when some anonymous cyber bitch gets the last pair of size 42 Raf Simons black high tops in their shopping cart before you during an online sale, you don't have to trouble your mind with your fellow customers when you shop on the net. Different story with bricks and mortar retail (see what I did there? Industry jargon. Ever the consummate professional). First, I was put off by the many (white) suburban wannabe gangsta types stalking the shop floor in bad jeans, Polo Ralph Lauren shirts, faux Rolexes and Gucci monogram belts with a sort of “look at me, I’m super G with all my visible branding, it gets me loads of pussy” look, their Tesco Bank credit cards primed to be maxed-out on Evisu jeans and Dolce & Gabbana sneakers. Second, and arguably worse, as I perused Lanvin in designer superbrands (noting how most of their clothes are actually very basic) out of the corner of my eye, near where the fitting rooms were, I caught a glimpse of flesh. Much more flesh than you should see in a department store on a Monday afternoon. “Heavens above,” I thought, “is that someone wearing a super avant-garde Margiela nude-coloured body stocking - or has some terrible wardrobe malfunction occurred? I must get a closer look.” The truth was much worse. THE tackiest gay guy I have ever seen had emerged from the fitting room with no shirt on and unbuttoned jeans displaying brightly coloured AussieBum underwear, to approving glances from his obese and much older boyfriend. Then, despite having a body which would score a 6/10 at best, he proceeded to WALK ALL AROUND the shop floor with unbuttoned jeans and no shirt and no shoes on, going “I’ll try one of those, and those, and those” in the MOST FLIPPANT AND VULGAR manner. I wanted to scream “PLEASE SHOW SOME RESPECT TO THE CLOTHES. THE DRIES DOES NOT DESERVE THIS. THE COMME CAN’T HANDLE IT” but instead I decided to leave the area ASAP. Oh, the humanity.

4) Bad beats – look, I’m not altogether impartial to a bit of Diana Ross, but it’s somehow not the sort of music which makes you think “ooh, I must drop £850 on this pre-moth-eaten Damir Doma sweater.” Still, it’s better than the pumping drum and bass which some stores favour. And I did appreciate the wry suitability of Ross' “I’m Coming Out” for the men’s fashion department.

5) "No photos allowed"  – oh, piss off.

What do you love/hate about fashion shopping?
post #62679 of 109053
^^ I love how they try to pitch their product's features as if you'd seriously sit down to weigh the costs and benefits of a wooden tie.
post #62680 of 109053
I'd only buy pure unvarnished wood ties so I can wear my own patina into it. Have fun with your True Religion-esque wood ties, squares.
post #62681 of 109053
What, no teak? No sale!
post #62682 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveoffice View Post

What do you love/hate about fashion shopping?

I love being able to try things on. Not having a model body, not knowing sizing specs of brands I've never seen in person, and being a ginger-but-not-quite-ginger, and having an overt amount of body hair if I'm wearing a scoop-neck all lead to troubles with clothes that I wish I could wear.

Living in Canada also has it's downfall in that some high end online retailers don't ship to Canada, and even if they do it gets stuck in customs and you might end up having to pay taxes on top of your purchase. If all websites had free returns I'd be all over that.

 

I hate the ridiculous amount of trekking I have to do sometimes to find what I'm looking for. H&M in Toronto finally introduced the trend collection to their stock, which is a godsend for people with my income level who love runway style, but it wasn't that easy finding it. I first noticed that a bunch of misc. trend garments were popping up in the Eaton's Centre location (their main location in the heart of downtown), so I asked a sales associate if they had any more. She informed me that they were carrying the collection at Yorkdale (north end of the city, way out of my way) so I decided it was worth it to go and look. I got there, asked a guy in the mens department, and he informed me that they had actually transferred it to their Queen st. location (farther from Yorkdale than Eaton's Centre is). I ended up spending 5 hours trekking across the city hunting this collection down when I expected to be out for 1 hour maybe when I started out.

post #62683 of 109053
last time i was in selfridges i registered a young couple, he in full suburban gangsta/obvious fake tan/gelled hair and muscle t shirt, she in abercrombie or whatever. as they passed by she gave him a fond kiss and said: "babe i can't believe how much you get checked out by the gay guys in here." i had just been noting what a tool he looked, but i was glad i made them happy.
Edited by robinsongreen68 - 8/14/12 at 2:26am
post #62684 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveoffice View Post

Pretty funny rant about why I shop online on hapsical blog Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Just a quick post that I wrote on my phone in the doctor's waiting room earlier this evening...so nu media, 2012, etc.
To kill time before my appointment, I just did a quick whip around the Selfridges menswear department for the first time in about a year. Don't get me wrong, I think Selfridges is a fine store, great for many things (especially for buying obscure zeitgeist-y European fashion magazines full of tits / cocks and not many clothes) but I just remembered why I buy 90% of my clothes online - and I SWEAR I'm not just saying this because I work for MR P. Here's why:
1) High-end retail staff – snooty old queens who were probably very effective at selling Gianfranco Ferre nehru-collar jackets or whatever in the early 90s but have now slightly lost the plot. The bitchiness I can just about deal with (by in my head delivering the immortal Absolutely Fabulous line which Eddy uses on a haughty gallery assistant: "you only work in a shop you know, you can drop the attitude"). But the phoniness really gets me. I'm standing there, dressed in minimal all black, holding out this multi-coloured silk Versace shirt, honestly just to get a proper look at how hideous it is, no doubt with a crumpled facial expression of horror to match, when an assistant saunters over and says "that shirt is JUST fabulous, isn't it? I saw it caught your eye, well it caught mine too, and I think it'd look great on you" Er, hello? Do I look by any stretch of the imagination like a turquoise and fuchsia Medusa-head pattern kind of guy? Which brings me to…
Gareth Pugh to the left, Versace to the right. Swarovski-crysal studded leather jacket with a £4,500 price tag top of my winter musn't-have list.
2) Stock horror – When you're shopping online you can easily filter out all the crap that you don't want to see, but when you have to sift through it in the store it weighs on the mind and reminds you what you hate about fashion. Givenchy, for example, selling a plain black nylon MA-1 bomber jacket, identical except for its plaid lining to one you which would find in an army surplus store for £30, for north of £1000. Balmain printed T-shirts which look like rejects from Superdry priced at £300, etc. etc. Merchandising malfunctions are avoided online too. In fairness to Selfridges, they have finally moved Ann Demeulemeesteer from ‘contemporary’ (beside J. Lindeberg and Stone Island) to ‘designer’ – something which used to gall me way more than it should have done – but other stores are still guilty of placement mishaps. The last time I went to Harrods, DRKSHDW Rick Owens was next to Just Cavalli, presumably based on the twisted logic that since they’re both ‘bridge’ lines they make excellent bedfellows.
3) Fellow Customers – Other than when some anonymous cyber bitch gets the last pair of size 42 Raf Simons black high tops in their shopping cart before you during an online sale, you don't have to trouble your mind with your fellow customers when you shop on the net. Different story with bricks and mortar retail (see what I did there? Industry jargon. Ever the consummate professional). First, I was put off by the many (white) suburban wannabe gangsta types stalking the shop floor in bad jeans, Polo Ralph Lauren shirts, faux Rolexes and Gucci monogram belts with a sort of “look at me, I’m super G with all my visible branding, it gets me loads of pussy” look, their Tesco Bank credit cards primed to be maxed-out on Evisu jeans and Dolce & Gabbana sneakers. Second, and arguably worse, as I perused Lanvin in designer superbrands (noting how most of their clothes are actually very basic) out of the corner of my eye, near where the fitting rooms were, I caught a glimpse of flesh. Much more flesh than you should see in a department store on a Monday afternoon. “Heavens above,” I thought, “is that someone wearing a super avant-garde Margiela nude-coloured body stocking - or has some terrible wardrobe malfunction occurred? I must get a closer look.” The truth was much worse. THE tackiest gay guy I have ever seen had emerged from the fitting room with no shirt on and unbuttoned jeans displaying brightly coloured AussieBum underwear, to approving glances from his obese and much older boyfriend. Then, despite having a body which would score a 6/10 at best, he proceeded to WALK ALL AROUND the shop floor with unbuttoned jeans and no shirt and no shoes on, going “I’ll try one of those, and those, and those” in the MOST FLIPPANT AND VULGAR manner. I wanted to scream “PLEASE SHOW SOME RESPECT TO THE CLOTHES. THE DRIES DOES NOT DESERVE THIS. THE COMME CAN’T HANDLE IT” but instead I decided to leave the area ASAP. Oh, the humanity.
4) Bad beats – look, I’m not altogether impartial to a bit of Diana Ross, but it’s somehow not the sort of music which makes you think “ooh, I must drop £850 on this pre-moth-eaten Damir Doma sweater.” Still, it’s better than the pumping drum and bass which some stores favour. And I did appreciate the wry suitability of Ross' “I’m Coming Out” for the men’s fashion department.
5) "No photos allowed"  – oh, piss off.
What do you love/hate about fashion shopping?

 

I took a stroll around Selfridges menswear very recently and this is absolutely and hilariously on point.  The most I've lol'd in a while... THE DRIES DOES NOT DESERVE THIS

 

Having said that bricks and mortar still has its place - I had no idea the psychedelic print Dries jacket and trousers were (disappointingly) of denim until I looked at them in Liberty's (which has better buys and less douchey clientele than Selfridges).  Its always good to check shit out in the flesh in other words.

 

Also I hadn't realised Hapsical worked for Mr Porter

post #62685 of 109053
did hapsical shave his head?
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