or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Random fashion thoughts
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Random fashion thoughts - Page 3913  

post #58681 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by smashwindow View Post

I agree with him premise but not its totality.  Most humanities business, lit, languages, foreign affairs, history, poly sci, geography, philosophy, religion probably not too well versed in logic and statistics.  Econ and psych tend to use logic and stats pretty regularly though.

 

Well philosophy is pretty much the study of logic, but I see what you're saying.  Poly sci, business, and probably history use statistics.  But any humanities major from a decent school is going to for sure know how to cite a published source, which was my point of contention.

post #58682 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike868y View Post

tumblr_m3fe9702ue1qz953wo1_500.jpg
.

awesome look. will replicate
post #58683 of 109053

100,000 people that ALL ALREADY HAVE HEART DISEASE. Its not really saying anything other than fat people are more likely to survive invasive surgery.  There is nothing wrong with the study just the idiot that misinterpreted it and wrote the blog post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thewho13 View Post


It wasn't a troll post, and I'm curious as to why you think that 100,000+ people doesn't constitute a sufficient sample size. In any case, you both are right when you point out what's lacking in that article, namely, non-broken links as sources. I'm a bit embarrassed that is the case, so I'll go find something more professionally done, and therefore more (I hope) stable.
Going back a little bit, I think that Teger and I might have wound up discussing two different things (as brad mentioned). "Obesity," however problematically that is defined, usually refers to a condition in which an individual does not exercise and does not eat healthfully. That is definitely unhealthy, no questions on my part. Being overweight, however, is not necessarily unhealthy. That seems to be counterintuitive to a lot of you, so, assuming this is still worthwhile to think about beyond this particular moment, I can look for something (professionally done) that can explain what that means.
Last time I'm linking to a fucking blog post, goddammit. facepalm.gif
post #58684 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post

it's a self perpetuating cycle. by 'tapping into' the social awareness they're reinforcing it. the buck stops somewhere, and for me it stop with advertisers.


it's definitely self perpetuating, except that advertisers get paid to do what they do, and (misogynist) sex sells. Obviously I think advertisers should find other ways of selling their product, but I think most of the blame rests on the consumer. Advertisers wouldn't do what they do if it didn't work so well

post #58685 of 109053

even then they don't seem to make good use of it nest.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by KingJulien View Post

 

Well philosophy is pretty much the study of logic, but I see what you're saying.  Poly sci, business, and probably history use statistics.  But any humanities major from a decent school is going to for sure know how to cite a published source, which was my point of contention.

post #58686 of 109053

what blazer is that?

Quote:
Originally Posted by aether View Post


awesome look. will replicate
post #58687 of 109053
^Engineered Garments Bedford
post #58688 of 109053
Well, a quick Google search and a quick turn-up of a few interesting articles. No one of these articles comes out definitively on any particular side of this debate (nor should any of them do so), but they do at the very least raise a fair amount of doubt—and point to a fair amount of doubt within the minds of mainstream researchers—regarding the correlation between health, BMI, weight, etc. If you still think being thin is healthier (and, by "thin," I imagine a lot of you mean "athletic" or "fit"), that's fine. But the point that I want to make is that being overweight—or even "obese," in some circumstances—does not necessarily mean unhealthy. The complexity of the issue, and the competing studies cited in the articles below, should problematize the hard and fast rule of "thin=healthy; fat=unhealthy" enough, I believe.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/01/06/phys-ed-can-you-be-overweight-and-still-be-healthy/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2026106/Being-fat-healthier-constantly-trying-diet.html

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1066937,00.html

Here's my favorite quote (from the first article):

“The fit or fat issue has unbelievable levels of complexity,” says Tim Church, M.D., Ph.D., the director of Preventive Medicine Research at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, La. Perhaps being active affects how fat cells operate in a heavy person. Age plays a role, too, he says, as do genetics. The very categorization of fatness using B.M.I. is a gross oversimplification, he adds. “You can’t just say being overweight” is unhealthy, he says. “Nothing is that simple.”


And, in any case, I feel like this weight/health bit is further away from what I wanted to say in the first point, namely, that society shaming people for their bodies is fucked up and wrong and needs to stop. Advertisers aren't the source of the problem, but they play a huge role in perpetuating it. If shaming people to be thin and "healthy"-looking actually worked, we'd have a lot more thin, healthy people than people with eating disorders and depression.
post #58689 of 109053

Before going to masters in ID.  I majored in econ, international affairs (which is a hodgepodge of philosophy, languages poli sci) and finally history.  When I muttered the words t test and standard deviation outside of my econ classes I was usually  left  with a room of blank stares.  And thats like the most  basic  of basic stat.

post #58690 of 109053
NOTHING TASTES AS GOOD AS THIN FEELS

BONUS:

1682439
post #58691 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by smashwindow View Post

Before going to masters in ID.  I majored in econ, international affairs (which is a hodgepodge of philosophy, languages poli sci) and finally history.  When I muttered the words t test and standard deviation outside of my econ classes I was usually  left  with a room of blank stares.  And thats like the most  basic  of basic stat.

even in history? lots of stats in history. i had to read a book this semester that was nothing but econ stats frown.gif
post #58692 of 109053

Thats true BMI is a joke.  According to BMI at 6'1 185lbs 13 % bodyfat I'm borderline overweight. 

Quote:

Originally Posted by thewho13 View Post

Well, a quick Google search and a quick turn-up of a few interesting articles. No one of these articles comes out definitively on any particular side of this debate (nor should any of them do so), but they do at the very least raise a fair amount of doubt—and point to a fair amount of doubt within the minds of mainstream researchers—regarding the correlation between health, BMI, weight, etc. If you still think being thin is healthier (and, by "thin," I imagine a lot of you mean "athletic" or "fit"), that's fine. But the point that I want to make is that being overweight—or even "obese," in some circumstances—does not necessarily mean unhealthy. The complexity of the issue, and the competing studies cited in the articles below, should problematize the hard and fast rule of "thin=healthy; fat=unhealthy" enough, I believe.
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/01/06/phys-ed-can-you-be-overweight-and-still-be-healthy/
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2026106/Being-fat-healthier-constantly-trying-diet.html
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1066937,00.html
Here's my favorite quote (from the first article):
“The fit or fat issue has unbelievable levels of complexity,” says Tim Church, M.D., Ph.D., the director of Preventive Medicine Research at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, La. Perhaps being active affects how fat cells operate in a heavy person. Age plays a role, too, he says, as do genetics. The very categorization of fatness using B.M.I. is a gross oversimplification, he adds. “You can’t just say being overweight” is unhealthy, he says. “Nothing is that simple.”
post #58693 of 109053

taking the economic history of Europe or something similar?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post


even in history? lots of stats in history. i had to read a book this semester that was nothing but econ stats frown.gif
post #58694 of 109053
post #58695 of 109053

I actually work on an eating disorder related piece of software as a hobby/job and consequently read a massive amount of what's published on the subject, albeit mostly related to treatment of adolescents and not epidemiology. From my quite possibly flawed recollection the tl;dr is that yes, media does have an impact, and incidences of anorexia and bulimia went up in countries where television was introduced relatively recently, but it was only a single factor and not a "P then Q" type relation. To just grab a summary from The Handbook of Eating Disorders, 2nd Ed, Treasure, Schmidt, Furth, et al

 

 

Stats Yo (Click to show)

The average prevalence rate for young females is 0.3% for anorexia nervosa and 1% for bulimia nervosa. The overall prevalence of obesity may be in the order of 5–10%. The overall incidence is at least 8 per 100 000 person-years for anorexia nervosa and 12 per 100 000 person-years for bulimia nervosa. No reliable incidence data are available for obesity. The standardized mortality rate in the first 10 years after detection is 9.6 for anorexia nervosa, 7.4 for bulimia nervosa. For obesity it is assumed that mortality is  elevated by about 50–150% in most adult populations.
The incidence rate of anorexia nervosa has increased during the past 50 years, particularly in females 10–24 years old. The registered incidence of bulimia nervosa has increased, at least during the first five years after bulimia nervosa was introduced in the DSM-III. The prevalence of obesity is increasing in most of the established market economies. Without societal changes a substantial and steadily rising proportion of adults will succumb to the
 medical complications of obesity.
Risk factor research is still sparse, both for eating disorders and for obesity. There is a need for prospective, follow-up designs using initially healthy subjects at high risk for developing an eating disorder or obesity. Depending on the question to be answered, these could be matched on sex, age and socio-economic status with initially healthy

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Streetwear and Denim
This thread is locked  
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Random fashion thoughts