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Random fashion thoughts - Page 3629  

post #54421 of 109053
girls are Cool
post #54422 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by APK View Post

This is pretty much spot on, even for a lot of women who dress really well themselves. It's like all of their fashion sense is spent on their ability to create great ensembles for themselves that there aren't any creative juices left when it comes to "guiding" their partner, so they just try to dress him up like he's on his way to get saved.

that's where I think that well-dressed me and well-dressed women differ. I think it's a combination of the ubiquity of poorly dressed males (i.e they're expected to not know how to choose clothing, or the low standards of "anything with a collar is dressy") and the fact that women tend to see men in tight clothes as effeminate that renders females unable to choose an outfit for their partner, or anyone of the opposite sex. Women who dress well, for themselves, have all the requisite tools (fit, fabric, colour, texture etc.) to create a great wardrobe for a male, but I believe it is their perceptions that hold them back from doing so. There are obvious exceptions to the rule, but through my observations, it is by and large valid.

the difference really comes in when males who know how to dress properly value fit, fabric and pattern for themselves and, because of the socially accepted view regarding female fashion, they have no inherent reservations, other than what looks ugly. By socially accepted views (I admit I am wording it poorly, but it is really for lack of a better term) I mean that women are seen to be more likely to experiment and 'step out of the box' so to speak, with clothing. This is why I feel like I can help my girl put together something nice, whereas she has trouble finding anything that would look good on me.
post #54423 of 109053
Nobody dresses well, it's all a scam.


* * *


I have the same pictures on my moodboard it's uncanny

Quote:


It’s unclear whether any rats were actually spotted that night, but the abandoned meatpacking plant where Siki Im, a German-born designer of Korean descent, presented his first men’s collection back in September of 2009 must have played host to a varmint or two. As editors arrived, a noisy band set up in the middle of the damp concrete floor. As the band drummed, the models — clad like castaways in bits and pieces of fine tailoring — encircled the band and audience. There was no fire pit in the middle, but there could have been.

Conjuring the spirit of William Golding’s “Lord of the Flies” in order to introduce a line of exquisitely constructed men’s suits seemed odd at the time, but odd in a good way, the perfect antidote to an overly commercial moment. It also felt brave: as New York continued to descend into the financial crisis, here was an upstart showing well-made suits with skirts, sleeveless suits and shorts/slacks with straps and bandages.

A few years before, Im had graduated from the Oxford Brookes School of Architecture, in London, and gone to work at a boutique architecture firm in New York. But throughout his studies he had idolized Helmut Lang, and he eventually got an opportunity he had long dreamed of: to work at Helmut Lang — albeit the Helmut-less Helmut Lang. Designing for what was now a large commercial company turned out to be an essential learning experience for Im. He discovered how product lines, merchandising and factories worked. But it didn’t live up to what he had imagined creatively. “I mean just the name, you know?” he says. “Lang’s design aesthetic changed everything.”

So he decided to strike out on his own, despite the bad economy.

As architects do when pitching a client, Im always begins a collection with an elaborate intellectual concept. This can be tricky, particularly in men’s fashion, in which “concept” feels very art school very fast. And New York, as opposed to a city like London, doesn’t easily forgive self-indulgent concept; it prefers a good business plan.

Im has pulled off both. His spring-summer 2010 collection successfully used the “Lord of the Flies” reference to establish a new grammar of tailoring: buttons and fasteners should all be covered, jacket pockets should fold over origami-like at the top to form a triangular flap, shirts should be tunic length under jackets, the skirt should interchange freely with the suit pant. While the styling and staging felt tribal, the actual pieces were more refined. Im seemed to imagine the island’s society as a tabula rasa, asking himself: What would a new beginning for men’s wear look like if I started it myself?

That debut proved he could translate high concept into functional, appealing, touch-it-and-feel-it clothes. His next collection was Wall Street-inspired, and seemed to cement Siki Im as a tailoring line. He discarded that identity the following season when he spun flowing silk sportswear out of an interest in “La Haine,” the French film about xenophobia. Fall 2011 mined American Indian and Amish ideas of geometry and shape.

The current spring collection, called “The Topography of Globalization,” would appear to be his most overtly political — although Im professes a different intention.

“I’m definitely influenced by academics who seem to have a more socialist leaning,” he says, mentioning people like the French philosophers Jean Baudrillard and Gilles Deleuze. But “it’s not their political opinion I am interested in — rather it’s their cultural and social theories and observations that help in my design process.”

In the notes that accompanied the spring show, references to Westernization, globalization and the Arab Spring were interwoven with quotes from the American Marxist philosopher and literary critic Fredric Jameson. The connection of such wide-ranging ideas to design, as Im put it, comes from the idea that globalization necessarily involves an import and an export. And he sees his collection posing an important question: If the Arab Spring represents — at least in part — an import of western democracy to the Middle East, what gets exported back to the West?

But here’s the thing: you can forget all of that. You don’t need to read those notes, or even care about them to like the clothes. And you certainly don’t need to see how pieces were styled in the show to wear them. Just know that the cargo pockets are subtle. The prints are vaguely reminiscent of desert camo. The shirts and scarves are generous and draped. And the Siki Im grammar speaks volumes.




post #54424 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by sipang View Post

Nobody dresses well, it's all a scam.
* * *
I have the same pictures on my moodboard it's uncanny

Is that THE SHAH in the last picture of the second row?
post #54425 of 109053
How are the Nike x Undercover collections so popular? Is the intersection of the running and SF demographics huge?
post #54426 of 109053
Too funny: http://www.styleforum.net/t/120192/the-official-rrl-thread/8685#post_5257914
Quote:
Originally Posted by afixedpoint View Post

How are the Nike x Undercover collections so popular? Is the intersection of the running and SF demographics huge?
Cause it's awesome?
post #54427 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lane View Post

like what?

the usual - racist and "u ghey" stuff
post #54428 of 109053
I am so lazy now; I can't read a post longer than three sentences.
post #54429 of 109053

reading comments on the sartorialist baldy[1].gif

post #54430 of 109053
i want to implement more american flags in my clothing for the spring and summer. any ideas?

not in like an annoying person salvation-army wave shit, but something a little more thoughtful

post-hipster style
post #54431 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by tween_spirit View Post

i want to implement more american flags in my clothing for the spring and summer. any ideas?
not in like an annoying person salvation-army wave shit, but something a little more thoughtful
post-hipster style
If I wanted to do this, I'd make a stencil and paint them on.
post #54432 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by tween_spirit View Post

i want to implement more american flags in my clothing for the spring and summer. any ideas?
not in like an annoying person salvation-army wave shit, but something a little more thoughtful
post-hipster style

Charlie Kelly has you covered:

197

197
post #54433 of 109053
Those Outcast by The Cast flag tees/tanks at UO are popping.
18407486_001_b?$detailMain$

Probably can find a pair of chucks or vans that happen to be flag printed too.

The John Varvatos antique flag scarf
2_V608N1AMON210_2_P.JPG
post #54434 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by APK View Post

Charlie Kelly has you covered:
197
197

yeah he's cool but its kind of like what i'm trying to avoid. i like the idea of worn out denim jacket + flag though, just maybe not as a bandanna
Quote:
Originally Posted by Desi View Post

Those Outcast by The Cast flag tees/tanks at UO are popping.
18407486_001_b?$detailMain$

eepBh.png

Quote:
Originally Posted by Desi View Post

Probably can find a pair of chucks or vans that happen to be flag printed too.
The John Varvatos antique flag scarf
2_V608N1AMON210_2_P.JPG

yeah that JC scarf is pretty perfect, but i'm not sure if i'm a lightweight scarf in the spring kind of guy. I'm sure I'll keep you all updated with what I come up with. also considering branded apparel for like coca cola and budweiser and marlboro. but i think supreme did a budweiser thing a few years back so maybe that's a bust?
post #54435 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by tween_spirit View Post

i want to implement more american flags in my clothing for the spring and summer. any ideas?
not in like an annoying person salvation-army wave shit, but something a little more thoughtful
post-hipster style
o1GaY.jpg
via JAK & JIL
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