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Random fashion thoughts - Page 7038  

post #105556 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by zxcvbn View Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/style-blog/wp/2015/02/13/nyfw-what-kanye-west-gets-right-about-fashion-and-what-he-gets-wrong/

probably the best-articulated critique I've read of the collection thus far for those interested
Quote:
NEW YORK — At half past the appointed hour for the unveiling of Kanye West’s collaboration with Adidas Original, the crowd of non-celebrity guests was still standing in a cramped hallway in a downtown warehouse along West Street waiting for the doors to open. It was the kind of dawdling that puts a fashion audience in a bad mood as they envision their tightly choreographed schedules of back-to-back appointments collapse.

When has a fashion show ever started on time?
post #105557 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyc wid it View Post

http://www.styleforum.net/t/24384/sf-cribs-the-places-behind-the-clothes

Holy shit... just the first page even. In SF? GG.

Matthew is cool and has great interior deco taste. He's suffering from the rich white guy Alessi juicer obsession though, these things are just plain shit to use.
post #105558 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by g transistor View Post

You can't really compare pho with ramen-- they're pretty different dishes. It really doesn't make sense to just say ramen either, since there are so many vastly different styles of ramen...there isn't even consistency in the actual noodles themselves. Makes no sense to say ramen is better than pho or vice versa, because it's like saying hot dogs are better than burgers. I mean, the concept is the same but they fill two completely different places in food.

With pho you primarily have two pervading styles: northern style and southern style. There hasn't been time for it to really develop into something as nuanced as ramen, and honestly there are better Vietnamese noodle dishes anyways (bun bo hue, bun rieu, hu tieu dac biet).

I will say that it is easier to find a great bowl of pho than it is to find a great bowl of ramen.

The reality that ya'll all are missing is this: pho is amazing for breakfast/brunch, especially without the heaviness of hoisin or sriracha. A nice, light and clear broth for the morning, and then for dinner you have a fatty, savory ramen, topped with some fried chicken. They're not in competition, they do best working in the same day

Dude, the pho vs ramen isn't an actual, serious debate. Just something you always hear "foodies" debating, for some obscure reason. No one seems to care about Thai or Malay food and they also do pretty good soup.
post #105559 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post

Matthew is cool and has great interior deco taste. He's suffering from the rich white guy Alessi juicer obsession though, these things are just plain shit to use.

Matt is a personal friend, and he does have really good taste.  But I really don't share his tastes.  I personally prefer a mix between Craftsman style/era furniture and crap I have left over from grad school.  I wouldn't feel comfortable, psychologically, living in a place as modernist as Matt's.  I want dark wood and stone and furniture that you can throw your friends over for being assholes without having to worry about whether it will break (because it will not be.)

 

Not sure about the seeming objection to the thread.  Some guys have more money, and have nice apartments and houses.  And good taste in furniture.  I don't think that it's out of line with the things we talk about here.  

post #105560 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

Matt is a personal friend, and he does have really good taste.  But I really don't share his tastes.  I personally prefer a mix between Craftsman style/era furniture and crap I have left over from grad school.  I wouldn't feel comfortable, psychologically, living in a place as modernist as Matt's.  I want dark wood and stone and furniture that you can throw your friends over for being assholes without having to worry about whether it will break (because it will not be.)

Not sure about the seeming objection to the thread.  Some guys have more money, and have nice apartments and houses.  And good taste in furniture.  I don't think that it's out of line with the things we talk about here.  

A lot of the CM guys who buy bespoke clothing seem to favor modernism for interior design. Foo has a theory for why this is, but I can't remember it.

I'm with you though. I favor old, dark wood Craftsman houses and interiors. When I first moved out of my parents house, I liked the modern stuff, but a lot of it is just so physically uncomfortable, if not mentally.
post #105561 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

Matt is a personal friend, and he does have really good taste.  But I really don't share his tastes.  I personally prefer a mix between Craftsman style/era furniture and crap I have left over from grad school.  I wouldn't feel comfortable, psychologically, living in a place as modernist as Matt's.  I want dark wood and stone and furniture that you can throw your friends over for being assholes without having to worry about whether it will break (because it will not be.)

Not sure about the seeming objection to the thread.  Some guys have more money, and have nice apartments and houses.  And good taste in furniture.  I don't think that it's out of line with the things we talk about here.  

I also mix up antiques/old wood stuff with more modern or contemporary pieces (Matt and I like a lot of the same stuff TBH). Really ties the room together as the dude would say. As weird as it sounds I'm not sure I'd start posting pictures of my interior and I don't hide my face in WAYWT pics (where you can sometimes see parts of said interior anyway). Can't really explain why.
post #105562 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post

Dude, the pho vs ramen isn't an actual, serious debate. Just something you always hear "foodies" debating, for some obscure reason. No one seems to care about Thai or Malay food and they also do pretty good soup.

People care, like people still care about jeans, which is a huge sector, despite the move away from denim since it is on the low ebb of trends right now.  Thai, especially, had it's time in the sun in the 00s.

 

There are tons of Thai restaurants, fewer Malaysian, all over North America, many of which do good food and good business.  Right now, ramen is at peak popularity (it's been getting there for about 5 years, at least, now. and so everyone is talking about that.  When that trend ebbs, which it will, we'll be left with the actual food being a part of the permanent culture.  I think that this is good.  If you grew up in North America and are over 30, you'll remember when there was mostly "American", Italian, and whatever ethnic foods corresponded to large local enclaves (in Kingston, ON, that was Portugese).  The food culture in the US has been enriched by, and this is pretty clear, The Food Network and offshoots and competitors, which increased demand and highlighted supply.  Who, in the 80s, knew the names of chefs, of any caliber?  To me, that was a perfect example of mass culture enriching our lives.  I really think that sites like this one, and Hypebeast, and whatever, similarly enriching our clothes culture.  There are, of course, downsides as well, but to me, the benefits have far outweighed those.  I like being able to buy a sous-vide machine without having to go to a restaurant supply store, and I like that I can get a really well executed porkchop or braised pork belly, in Moscow, ID. 

 

And I like being able to call up an SA in Boston or London, be able to reference their stock, and have a regular SA be able to tell me about the material weight and weave type, and leather characteristics, in unambiguous and concise language.

post #105563 of 109053
To be clear, I'm impressed, not objecting. The place on page 3 is more my speed with the brick wall, but yeah.
post #105564 of 109053

Kanye looks like watered down, cheaply-made HL without the contrasting tailored element or the cultural context of 15 years ago. urbansweatapocalyptic athleisurblah blah whatvr. 

post #105565 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post

Kanye looks like watered down, cheaply-made HL without the contrasting tailored element or the cultural context of 15 years ago. urbansweatapocalyptic athleisurblah blah whatvr. 

I hope kanye keeps at it. I don't like him but he is very tenacious and I think he has potential because of that. He just needs to take a step back, pause, and think

Wishful thinking
post #105566 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

People care, like people still care about jeans, which is a huge sector, despite the move away from denim since it is on the low ebb of trends right now.  Thai, especially, had it's time in the sun in the 00s.

There are tons of Thai restaurants, fewer Malaysian, all over North America, many of which do good food and good business.  Right now, ramen is at peak popularity (it's been getting there for about 5 years, at least, now. and so everyone is talking about that.  When that trend ebbs, which it will, we'll be left with the actual food being a part of the permanent culture.  I think that this is good.  If you grew up in North America and are over 30, you'll remember when there was mostly "American", Italian, and whatever ethnic foods corresponded to large local enclaves (in Kingston, ON, that was Portugese).  The food culture in the US has been enriched by, and this is pretty clear, The Food Network and offshoots and competitors, which increased demand and highlighted supply.  Who, in the 80s, knew the names of chefs, of any caliber?  To me, that was a perfect example of mass culture enriching our lives.  I really think that sites like this one, and Hypebeast, and whatever, similarly enriching our clothes culture.  There are, of course, downsides as well, but to me, the benefits have far outweighed those.  I like being able to buy a sous-vide machine without having to go to a restaurant supply store, and I like that I can get a really well executed porkchop or braised pork belly, in Moscow, ID. 

And I like being able to call up an SA in Boston or London, be able to reference their stock, and have a regular SA be able to tell me about the material weight and weave type, and leather characteristics, in unambiguous and concise language.

Oh I don't necessarily disagree although a lot of the ethnic food was still there in various large cities, it just wasn't fancy and fancied. Our current first world problem is related to that newer situation though: cities food/fashion/design scenes are starting to look for the most part to be the same. When I talk about starbuckification people think of chains and stuff they don't like (it's for plebs bullshit etc) but in reality it also refers to somewhat nice sushi places and hipster butchers everywhere. I guess sushi might not be the best example because it is now ALSO western food, part of the landscape. Interior deco of shops is also similar. On the other hand I'm currently in Montréal and I can find nice scented candles, this used to be something more french I guess and not a worldwide hype shop with nice vintage wood furniture and barbour mixed with engineered garments, red wings boots, opinel knives and vintage shaving kits type thing.

I was looking at the first few pages of the thread cyd posted, the forum was really made richer by having a feew people who starting being passionate about other aspects of design before they got heavily into clothing (Matthew, Lucky strike, Labelking etc.). I feel a lot of "kids" today (get off my lawn!!) are tumblerified into fashion and will have boring shit taste in other areas.
post #105567 of 109053
If I take Paris as an example there are now a lot of the following things:

-hipster quality burger places (the elevation of street/fast food is one of the hallmark of foodie culture).
-tapas or mediterranean style food everywhere
-cocktails, mixologists and speakeasies (O_o)
-interior designs reminiscent of Brooklyn or whatever (either the vintage wood style of the sparse loft style).

Problem is Paris already had a rich design and food culture and the new stuff mostly looks ridiculous here if you stop to think about it (Haussmann+loft style is yuck!). I want to eat fucking boeuf bourguignon not that shit!

Foodie culture mainly benefitted places that had poorer traditions in the area (like North America) by elevating what was already there, made sense and had true potential. You can now eat delicious, lumberjack style stew or whatever and it is a good thing. In other places the scenario is a little bit more complicated, I don't want us to become one big mushy world culture.
post #105568 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post

If I take Paris as an example there are now a lot of the following things:

-hipster quality burger places (the elevation of street/fast food is one of the hallmark of foodie culture).
-tapas or mediterranean style food everywhere
-cocktails, mixologists and speakeasies (O_o)
-interior designs reminiscent of Brooklyn or whatever (either the vintage wood style of the sparse loft style).

Problem is Paris already had a rich design and food culture and the new stuff mostly looks ridiculous here if you stop to think about it (Haussmann+loft style is yuck!). I want to eat fucking boeuf bourguignon not that shit!

Foodie culture mainly benefitted places that had poorer traditions in the area (like North America) by elevating what was already there, made sense and had true potential. You can now eat delicious, lumberjack style stew or whatever and it is a good thing. In other places the scenario is a little bit more complicated, I don't want us to become one big mushy world culture.

Are those new shops driving out the old ones that are more to your taste or is it just their presence that bothers you
post #105569 of 109053

one of the recent Bourdains had him in some outying Paris neighborhoods (10th or 19th maybe) trying more modern food. it seemed to fit in that context. more of an updated bistro - not really trying to be a Brooklyn type place. but agree, would be weird to try to create some "locavore/artisan joint in more central part of town in a hausmann interior. Boeuf Bourguignon 4life.

 

rft: I just sold a couple old HL and yohji things and the shipping address was a design dept at [famous paris fashion house]. 

 

:revolve: 

post #105570 of 109053
"I've heard from people working at different fashion houses that there is always a Helmut Lang piece hanging and it's right there to be copied." --Bernhard Willhelm
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