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Random fashion thoughts - Page 6916  

post #103726 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultaVexillum View Post

Kind of on the same topic ^^

Are there any costume designers (movies, theater, whatevs) turned designers, either with their own label or designing for someone else?

I believe there was an LA based costumer-turned-designer that was gaining momentum but she passed away in a somewhat dramatic fashion, I don't recall the whole story or the name of the line, but for some reason I thought it was somehow connected to Demobaza. I could have dreamt up this whole thing though.
post #103727 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post

WTF?? Guys, designers barely make statements about their collection, they are almost never "theory inspired" or whatever you are incorrectly referring to. They hopefully had to read some Heidegger and Benjamin during their education because everyone should have to, we're talking about two major thinkers.

If Ann D was inspired by anime her designs wouldn't have soared to their heights the women collections sometimes did. Why that said we're talking about a Rimbaud and William Blake imagining done via Patti Smith and, less specifically, their pop-culture perception, nothing to fancy or profound in the source.

A few points:
1) Designers generally name visual (i.e. Giacometti), narrative (William Blake wandering around the countryside) or mood-related (armour and protection) references. You don't know shit if you think otherwise, all offense meant. Heidegger, ORLY.?
2) They're not bullshitting you, inspiration needs to come from somewhere. PR materials will tend to use the same simple refs and narrative about the designer over and over to have a simple message, yeah.
3) If you don't find ANYTHING intellectually worthwhile in fashion maybe you should stop being interested in it. Yeah it's just clothes but c'mon.

My objection is not to the fact that there is inspiration, it's that the inspiration is often so insipid and unoriginal, and the statements are written up in the same style and with the same depth as a grade nine essay, that the teacher gave an "A" for being so evocative.  I can generally overlook statements that speak to a specific personal experience.

 

I would much rather see photographs of the inspiration board.  Verbal communication doesn't seem to be a strength of designers. but they are often very visually imaginative.  Why not play to their strengths rather than their weaknesses?

post #103728 of 109053

Photographs of inspiration board: I'm pretty sure one of those minimalistic Scandinavian fashion brands had an ad like that, can't remember which one though. Not TOS, but maybe OL.

post #103729 of 109053
Antonio at Eidos often does that (photos of the season's mood board). And, for those interested, I find these quite interesting in pulling all the collection together.
post #103730 of 109053
Sometimes I like reading artist's statements, sometimes I find they detract from the work. I went to art school and when I see a bunch of artist speak words I can't help but roll my eyes.

Clothing is the same.

I love reading GBS's ideas running wild in text, but, as an example, 3sixteen is a brand that I will never buy from simply based on their religious background.
post #103731 of 109053
excuse my ignorance, what does 3sixteen have to do with religion? in that vein, i won't buy wvg stuff after seeing what mauro said about brad (0)

on another note, i predict the vansonxstyleforum thread will become the new toj thread which was the new dayton thread.
post #103732 of 109053
guessing John 3:16
post #103733 of 109053
On 3sixteen's "about" page it says something about doing what they do in accordance to their faith. Excuse my ignorance but I believe 3:16 is a popular passage in the Holy Bible.

EDIT: @pickpackpockpuck beat me to it.
post #103734 of 109053
http://www.3sixteen.com/pages/about

"Our faith dictates our values. We aim to run our business with integrity and serve our customers with humility."

Yeah, fuck that shit.
post #103735 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post



WTF?? Guys, designers barely make statements about their collection, they are almost never "theory inspired" or whatever you are incorrectly referring to. They hopefully had to read some Heidegger and Benjamin during their education because everyone should have to, we're talking about two major thinkers.

If Ann D was inspired by anime her designs wouldn't have soared to their heights the women collections sometimes did. Why that said we're talking about a Rimbaud and William Blake imagining done via Patti Smith and, less specifically, their pop-culture perception, nothing to fancy or profound in the source.

A few points:
1) Designers generally name visual (i.e. Giacometti), narrative (William Blake wandering around the countryside) or mood-related (armour and protection) references. You don't know shit if you think otherwise, all offense meant. Heidegger, ORLY.?
2) They're not bullshitting you, inspiration needs to come from somewhere. PR materials will tend to use the same simple refs and narrative about the designer over and over to have a simple message, yeah.
3) If you don't find ANYTHING intellectually worthwhile in fashion maybe you should stop being interested in it. Yeah it's just clothes but c'mon.

 

If you mean that if Ann D's designs remained the same but chose to associate her inspirations with anime rather than figures of the Western canon, then her place within the fashion pantheon would be much lower, then I can only say that's very unfortunate. Again, I recognize fashion requires a discourse much like any other art, but as a patron and consumer, I judge clothes as I judge art, by forms/silhouette, textures, colors, prints, technique, alongside price. In fact I see SF as a place to escape from intellectualized aesthetic judgments, where people can comment on pure visual elements without any theory. I can't think of another place where this is possible. When I look at paintings in class I have to constantly think about how to justify my aesthetic tastes, similarly with talking/writing about literature or movies or music. I think it's terrible that the inspirations for a collection, especially when entered into the conversation of high vs. low art can dramatically alter its conception.

 

For Blake, I expected fantastical imagery, mythical narratives. Without going into detail since I don't wanna pretend I know how to critique fashion as fashion, the menswear collection from that season had lots of the same black from other seasons and none of the spectacle I hoped to see -- to the point that I wondered why Blake was an inspiration at all as he seems to clash with the colors and forms Ann D seems to favor.

 

1. I was mostly thinking of this:

 

http://elenadawson.co.uk/extras.html

 

S/S 2010 -

 

"Movement and inertia are often considered a natural pair. Yet this union is subject to change. The aesthetic vision at the core of "Obstruction Archive" is to explore the middle ground between the flow of becoming and the incursion of a static materiality."

 

Geoffrey B. Small did a collection inspired by the financial crisis and occupy wall-street, with models dressed like figures from the great depression. Not necessarily "theory inspired" but ideologically driven.

 

2. I'm sure they're not but often the inspiration, when too specific or intellectual just seems awkward, especially if the designs themselves are not inspired.

 

3. I look at art with my senses, I hope to never be intellectually stimulated by fashion.

post #103736 of 109053
lol8[1].gif
post #103737 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by hooker4186 View Post

http://www.3sixteen.com/pages/about

"Our faith dictates our values. We aim to run our business with integrity and serve our customers with humility."

Yeah, fuck that shit.

I read this as sarcastic, excuse me if I'm wrong... I have nothing wrong with those values, but why attach it to organized religion? That's what I don't agree with. But I'm sure they're doing fine without me buying their products, so it's all good.
post #103738 of 109053

We're often on the 395 passing through Bishop, CA going one direction or another. There is a fairly-recent BBQ restaurant there called "Holy Smoke" that is clearly run by fundamentalist nutcases. They play worship music, even. I hate to support it. But shit, their BBQ is just too damn good. They get us every time.

post #103739 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClambakeSkate View Post

Sometimes I like reading artist's statements, sometimes I find they detract from the work. I went to art school and when I see a bunch of artist speak words I can't help but roll my eyes.

 

I know it's mean and biased but that's how I feel too. I think artists, and more importantly writers have some responsibility in defending their work from misinterpretation, but other than that they should say as little as possible.

 

Yes I just happened to have this quote handy:

 

"“There was the theorist-critic, who dealt with forms and genre; the historical critic, who traced influence and the connections of art with social life; the psychological critic, who speculated about instinct and emotion; the impressionist critic, who recorded for the reader (as Anatole France put it) “the adventures of his soul among masterpieces”; and there was of course the ubiquitous reviewer, who might be any one of these types or a little bit of each in a casual mixture of his own“  (Jacques Barzun Criticism: An Art or a Craft?)."

 

Impressionist/psychological criticism is much more difficult and often badly attempted.

post #103740 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

My objection is not to the fact that there is inspiration, it's that the inspiration is often so insipid and unoriginal, and the statements are written up in the same style and with the same depth as a grade nine essay, that the teacher gave an "A" for being so evocative.  I can generally overlook statements that speak to a specific personal experience.

I would much rather see photographs of the inspiration board.  Verbal communication doesn't seem to be a strength of designers. but they are often very visually imaginative.  Why not play to their strengths rather than their weaknesses?

I'll probably be attacked for this, but you could criticize anything with this view. Any movie, song, or painting that claims to be inspired by some broader intellectual idea (that is, an idea outside of the narrower world within which they operate, such as cinamatography or whatever) tends to be fairly superficial, insipid, or unoriginal. I've never heard a song or watched a movie that was as intellectually profound as Heidegger, so I'm not sure why a piece of clothing should be expected to rise to that level.

Is that to say that art shouldn't be inspired by bigger intellectual ideas? Just because something isn't as intellectually profound as its inspiration doesn't mean it's not worthwhile. Alexander McQueen's fashion shows had fairly superficial ideas (intellectually), but they were really beautiful ways to communicate a superficial or common idea (e.g. the Highland "rape" show).

(Incidentally, most academic work isn't as good as Blake or Heidegger, so ...)
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