or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Random fashion thoughts
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Random fashion thoughts - Page 6833  

post #102481 of 109053
i just learned that retailers taking political stands weirds me out even when i support the cause
post #102482 of 109053
I know i will never shop at Union. The witnesses who said Brown had his hamds up admitted to lying during the trial. 1 of the witnesses who corroborated Wilson's account was murdered yet the media doesnt report any of this.
post #102483 of 109053
post #102484 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by wogbog View Post

i just learned that retailers taking political stands weirds me out even when i support the cause

I dunno, I was sorta taken aback by MrPorter supporting ISIS but their editorial with black flowing clothes was really cool for once, except for that "be Dīn at the office in style" editorial pairing RL chinos and penny loafers with a Rick Owens black headress.
post #102485 of 109053
Lol Vox and the Huffington Post are the most liberal news sites ever. Yahoo had an article on how at least 2 key witnesses for Brown lied on the stand. 1 of them did it with the protection that they wouldnt be prosecuted for perjury.

Did you see the video taken of the shooting where the guy recording or the one he was talking to said Brown charged the officer? Also google Deandre Joshua. Dude is from Ferguson and he was a key witness for Wilson. His name and testimony was released and he was found shot in the head the first night of the riots.

The US media tries to spin everything. You have to read BBC or some other European sites if you want unbiased reporting.
post #102486 of 109053

I feel that clothing retailers, like art, should remain separate from politics.

post #102487 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by accordion View Post

I feel that clothing retailers, like art, should remain separate from politics.

Art doesn'tremain separate from politics, 19th century art for art's sake is dead.
post #102488 of 109053

Or I should say aesthetics in general. Don't like Greenberg, I remember reading him and Baudelaire side by side and the difference was night and day.

 

Even compared to Herbert Read, Greenberg didn't write very well and had the air of a psuedo-intellectual or failed philosopher masquerading as art critic, kind of a charismatic cult leader who charmed his way into history.

post #102489 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by accordion View Post

Or I should say aesthetics in general. Don't like Greenberg, I remember reading him and Baudelaire side by side and the difference was night and day.

Even compared to Herbert Read, Greenberg didn't write very well and had the air of a psuedo-intellectual or failed philosopher masquerading as art critic, kind of a charismatic cult leader who charmed his way into history.

Who cares, I corrected it anyway because Greenberg had a social angle (true art versus kitsch = progressist versus retrograde). The point is that there isn't much art produced today that doesn't take some kind of social stance, it is almost unavoidable. The default function of art is a social one anyway, modern (european) art attempted a separation at some point but it never gelled completely.
post #102490 of 109053

The history is very long and complicated, you can say the divide first appeared when Plato banished the poets from his republic. In literature, conservatives like Harold Bloom are still alive and kicking. From a slightly more practical perspective, and some recent experience, disregarding aesthetics for its own sake has made American students and academics terrible writers.

 

I don't remember much of what I learned about art history after Greenberg but I think I disliked that artists suddenly became intellectual around the time of Seurat, and from then on everyone had to answer to philosophical questions about the purpose and nature of art rather than just paint from instinct.

 

To clarify, I'm bringing up a negative consequence of of mixing aesthetics with politics in American pedagogy. Composition classes often only teach students how to persuade, rather than to write for any other purpose, or no purpose. The result is students never look at prose but only through it. So we get all these academics who can only write in the plain style and get mad at others who don't. The long term consequence extends far beyond a lack of style but cultivates a general aversion to aesthetics. On the other side, academia is flooded with theory, especially when used as a crutch, and it often dilutes if not ruins the aesthetic power of whatever they write about.


Edited by accordion - 11/28/14 at 9:58am
post #102491 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by accordion View Post

The history is very long and complicated, you can say the divide first appeared when Plato banished the poets from his republic. In literature, conservatives like Harold Bloom are still alive and kicking. From a slightly more practical perspective, and some recent experience, disregarding aesthetics for its own sake has made American students and academics terrible writers.

I don't remember much of what I learned about art history after Greenberg but I think I disliked that artists suddenly became intellectual around the time of Seurat, and from then on everyone had to answer to philosophical questions about the purpose and nature of art rather than just paint from instinct.

To clarify, I'm bringing up a negative consequence of of mixing aesthetics with politics in American pedagogy. Composition classes often only teach students how to persuade, rather than to write for any other purpose, or no purpose. The result is students never look at prose but only through it. So we get all these academics who can only write in the plain style and get mad at others who don't. The long term consequence extends far beyond a lack of style but cultivates a general aversion to aesthetics. On the other side, academia is flooded with theory, especially when used as a crutch, and it often dilutes if not ruins the aesthetic power of whatever they write about.

Most artists are really bad at discussing art, especially theirs. This doesn't mean the art itself does not have a sociopolitical dimensions, it is just unavoidable, they live in and reflect society. Ar for the writing, well, not really a concern of mine as far as universities are concerned so I can't say. Not everyone gets to be Blanchot.
post #102492 of 109053

I'm curious how Marxist art historians talk about someone like Gauguin then. Surely tracing the social conditions that drove him out of Paris doesn't explain or translate his later aesthetic inspirations and philosophy. Sorry he's the only dude I know well enough and I think this same conversation has come up before in this thread. And sorry for detracting from the original topic.

post #102493 of 109053
Quote:
Originally Posted by accordion View Post

I'm curious how Marxist art historians talk about someone like Gauguin then. Surely tracing the social conditions that drove him out of Paris doesn't explain or translate his later aesthetic inspirations and philosophy. Sorry he's the only dude I know well enough and I think this same conversation has come up before in this thread. And sorry for detracting from the original topic.

I do believe I had that conversation with someone on SF, probably you...

In The Rules of Art: Genesis and Structure of the Literary Field Bourdieu made the argument (see intro IIRC) that explaning the social determinations of a field (in this case the artistic field) does not remove the inherent "magic" present in said field and it's non-reflexive appreciation, it's just another very important angle that completes our understanding of what is going on. I don't think reading Adorno will mess Schoenberg for you...
post #102494 of 109053

Thanks, will look into it, I've actually read La Distinction.

post #102495 of 109053
Wait, where are these hoards of plainly written, non-obscurantist humanities articles again? We must have different subscriptions. I'd like to check those out....
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Streetwear and Denim
This thread is locked  
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Random fashion thoughts