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Incorporating the workwear aesthetic into a non-workwear wardrobe - Page 3

post #31 of 43
BRAND Synergy
post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToruOkada View Post
I haven't found much trouble with this either. Not hard to incorporate EG/WWM stuff with peasant brands such as J.Crew or even GAP I'd bet.

Right on. If you feel the need to be dressed from head to toe in strictly work wear-type stuff when that's not your usual garb, it might smack of playing dress up.
post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by APK View Post
Right on. If you feel the need to be dressed from head to toe in strictly work wear-type stuff when that's not your usual garb, it might smack of playing dress up.
I'm a bit new at this, but isn't that part of going for a look/cohesive outfit? It can be taken too far, sure, but thinking "Oh, it's chilly, I'll wear a flannel and jeans today, I guess boots would go with that" just like a hot day you'd wear maybe a seersucker shirt with chino shorts and boat shoes. I guess part of it for me is just getting comfortable putting a full look together with basics, I'll work on mix n match in time.
post #34 of 43
There's definitely that school of thought. I don't completely disagree with it, but I think in the end, it's best to stay true to yourself. Nothing wrong with trying different things. It just sounds like the OP is having trouble really nailing this look. If that's the case, he might be better off sticking with ensembles that incorporates a work wear piece or two with the things he normally wears.
post #35 of 43
I want to jump in here because I think that I can cure some of the dilemmas that one might have by merging designers / looks together and not look like a bag of balloons.
When I got into this business in the late 70's there was a confluence of designers vying for the spot light but two many were too special. Armani, Versace, Montana, Ferre in one camp, Lauren, Ellis, Julian in another and people like Westwood and Paul Smith sneaking in. These are just to name a few but all with different points of view. This point of view, as a sales consultant, was a determining factor as to a direction in which we would help establish ones look. I was at an advantage, having been a student of Art and Design, I was able to utilize the fundamentals of Shape, Color and Texture and apply them to what I visually created as outfits.
Women seem to pull this off seemingly naturally but they also are digging relentlessly and ruthlessly to bring together the latest and greatest. By digging, I mean they are doing there homework by studying.
Magazines, magazines, magazines. Reading them and paying attention to whatever the media is suggesting is happening.
I'm not that familiar with Tegers looks but from what I have seen, he has a pension for the skinny. Does that work with suggested topic, I think so in some cases. My critical eye would say no if he were to attempt to meld Engineer Jacket with BoO Shirt. Boxy Jacket / Skinny Shirt - Round Hole / Square Block.
My best advice would be to experiment with your wardrobe, "which I know" is an Oxymoron for a guy. Pull everything out of your closet and start mixing things that you normally wouldn't. Your eye will eventually tell you yes or no but if it's not comfortable the first time and your unsure, try it again on another occasion, you might have a different opinion. I call this the emotional relationship between you and your wardrobe, sometimes it works, sometimes it sucks, it's the bitch in all of us.
Another lesson I always suggest to my clients is to study mannequins in every store you go in, they are the silent salesman, that tell stories and give us ideas. I always benefit from these because it's a "Duh" experience. Like, why didn't I think of that???
WAYWT would be good place to get critiques of looks your unsure of but beware of the uncharitable.

I could go on but need to get to work. Challenge yourself. Fail. Learn. We might call you Bozo but at least you've achieved that. Later!

Gary
post #36 of 43
^ Good advice. To me there's still some selected pieces (off the top of my head: deck pants, chore coats) that are tough to make work unless you commit to that aesthetic 100%, but (as has been said) I don't see the difficulty in working, say, a chambray, plaid flannel, peacoat or work boots amongst classic American brands. If it's the really idiosyncratic workwear details that are throwing things off, look for designers offering more modern interpretations on these styles.
post #37 of 43
I read this whole thread and maybe I am to dumb to understand what's trying to be said but for me this is how I see it. You either know how to dress or you don't. you either have a level of confidence to make that particular outfit work or you don't. it's really that simple. mixing fabrics, colors, prints..etc that's one of the best things about fashion! Best, Mauro note- just because you buy designer clothes does not mean you know how to dress.
post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post
I'm referring to designer workwear.. Haversack, EG, WWM, Yakuten, Quoddy, etc.

I guess this is also applicable to some of the more budget workwear brands, but I don't feel they have the same kitschy appeal

wish I could help, but this is so outside of my frame of understanding.

so, essentially you are saying that you like wearing expensive clothing that looks like cheap work clothes, but you aren't sure that you can mix them with your expensive tailored clothing? is that about it?

I like "workwear" - there was a time I wouild go to uniform stores and buy the type of uniforms that a janitor might wear, very often with an oxford cloth shirt. they lasted a long time and were comfortable. then I stopped.
post #39 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
wish I could help, but this is so outside of my frame of understanding.

so, essentially you are saying that you like wearing expensive clothing that looks like cheap work clothes, but you aren't sure that you can mix them with your expensive tailored clothing? is that about it?

I like "workwear" - there was a time I wouild go to uniform stores and buy the type of uniforms that a janitor might wear, very often with an oxford cloth shirt. they lasted a long time and were comfortable. then I stopped.

I guess what I'm saying is I like the ideas and designs represented by the designer workwear (and yes, expensive clothes that look cheap), but there's definitely a challenge of trying to fit some of the more esoteric pieces (ie: EG Norfolk Jacket) in with basics without looking like a clown.
post #40 of 43
Interesting comment, Gary!
post #41 of 43
I agree very much with Gary. Over the years I've bought a fair amount of EG, from him and from Odin in New York. I wouldn't describe my aesthetic as 'skinny' - I'm a pretty big guy - and so I've often assumed that the pieces would just work. In fact, though, I often get home and find that they only work in certain ways, in particular combinations with other clothes. As a result, over the years i've ended up putting some of it up for sale here - that's actually how I found the forum. I had to sell a Bedford jacket I bought from Gary because I found it just wasn't working with my other clothes, even though I loved it for what it was. But my work shirts and Chesterfield coat from EG are among my favorite items of clothing. Why? I think because of small details in fit and design which I wouldn't have noticed without trying on and even owning the clothes, and which happen to fit with the rest of what I own. I'm not good enough to see all this stuff at first glance. I look at it like this: when you're trying to mix clothes from two universes, like say APC and EG, there is no rule that will make it work. If there were, it wouldn't be interesting. So you just have to be willing to experiment a lot with individual items, which means a lot of work, trying things on multiple times, etc. There just is a higher failure rate, so you have to put in more time. You can't buy without trying on, because it will be maybe one or two items in a given season of EG or WWM which will fit. I have high hopes this season for one of the Andover jackets!
post #42 of 43
While the question itself is interesting, let's face it, Ben apparently has is head up his ass. Saying that something, anything, doesn't work with a plain v-neck and jeans (unless the colors are really outlandish) is like saying that you are having trouble making an outfit that matches your boxer briefs. Plain v-necks and jeans are a canvas, not a finished painting. The canvas puts some very broad parameters on the painting (size, for example), but there is a lot of movement within them.
post #43 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post
While the question itself is interesting, let's face it, Ben apparently has is head up his ass. Saying that something, anything, doesn't work with a plain v-neck and jeans (unless the colors are really outlandish) is like saying that you are having trouble making an outfit that matches your boxer briefs. Plain v-necks and jeans are a canvas, not a finished painting. The canvas puts some very broad parameters on the painting (size, for example), but there is a lot of movement within them.

phf, this is coming from someone who thinks nice collective is well designed

and anyway, yes, many things don't work with a slim v-neck tshirt and SLIM jeans.
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