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Easy dinners - Page 3

post #31 of 62
I'm doing an easy, lazy dinner. Sauteed off some mushrooms and onions, tossed a couple of Angus patties into the pan and seared them. Can of mushroom and roasted garlic soup, some P&S, shoyu, a little water, and let simmer. Will slice some fresh made bread, and laddle a pattie and fixings over the bread for wife and me.
post #32 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
I'm doing an easy, lazy dinner. Sauteed off some mushrooms and onions, tossed a couple of Angus patties into the pan and seared them. Can of mushroom and roasted garlic soup, some P&S, shoyu, a little water, and let simmer. Will slice some fresh made bread, and laddle a pattie and fixings over the bread for wife and me.
That sounds like something you would serve from a trough, Pio.
post #33 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek View Post
That sounds like something you were serve from a trough, Pio.

Tasty, hardy, and easy. Not every night is a 20 ingredient, five cooking stages meal.
post #34 of 62
50-50 Spinach mix
dried cranberries
fresh cold blueberries
pistachios
sharp cheddar
raspberry vinegarette
tortilla
=yummy wrap
post #35 of 62
Simple meals are usually some seared or grilled fish (salmon or ocean trout usually), with mash potatoes and steamed green vegetables.

The trick is to make a simple sauce to match. Ginger jus or mint & cucumber relish works well. And don't forget the sea salt.

A nice glass of wine and you're set.
post #36 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek View Post
I don't think I do anything special.. I saute green onions in butter, add in lots of minced garlic when i am almost done the onions. I don't brown the garlic, I just cook it a bit to release flavor. I use lots of garlic because I love garlic and i like the cream heavily flavored, but you obviously do it to taste. I fill the sauté pan with cooking cream, add salt and pepper, bring to a boil and reduce the cream. I put some parmigiano-reggiano in the pan towards the end so it mixes with the cream. While the cream is reducing I cook the pasta al dente. I strain and put it in with the cream to finish. It helps to have a sauté pan with solid aluminum or copper side-walls as it will reduce faster. Timing is the most important thing though. You have to learn how long it will take to reduce the cream to the right consistency and when to put the pasta on. It you cook it too long or too short, or wait too long to serve it after it's done, it won't be good. When it's done I top with more parmigiano.
Thanks! Can you give proportions at all for the ingredients?
post #37 of 62
^^ You can give this one a try and see how it comes out for you.
http://www.kevinandamanda.com/recipe...e-alfredo.html

Myself I'd slice the chicken and not leave it whole like they have it in that recipe, but whatever you like.
post #38 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tardek View Post
Thanks! Can you give proportions at all for the ingredients?

Most of it is to taste. If you do it a couple times you'll see what your preference is. I usually put mushrooms in it as well, although Matt would tell you that's not really alfredo anymore. Some might use a tablespoon of minced garlic and a couple tablespoons of parmigiano. I use more garlic. The most important thing is to add the garlic after the mushrooms and onions are almost done since you don't want it to brown and turn bitter. At the same time you need enough oil/butter so that it doesn't blacken, but cooks gently. Don't use too much or your dish will be oily and it'll cause your sauce to break and clump. I probably use about 2 cups of cream, but it's hard to tell because i just do everything by eye. You should max the heat and the cream starts to foam ease off a bit.

FWIW, whenever I do a new recipe, I will do it repeatedly until i've mastered it. I'm probably a little obsessive about it, but there's really something to be said for doing it on back-to-back nights, because what didn't work will be clear in your mind and you can remember the things you did that make all the difference. Little things can have big effects on the final result.
post #39 of 62
Have you just tried perhaps opening a can or three of beer and then pouring it into a pan when the beer begins simmering then insert a couple of hot dogs into the hot liquid so they can slowly and gently cook the flavor imparted by the beer is fantastic and i am sure you can tell everyone there are few things as nice as inserting a tube of meat into your mouth and having the hot tasty juices glide down your willing throat that is always tasty for me but what do you think about that that would be my best suggestion for an easy dinner of course nothing is wrong with say cereal or eggs or some other breakfast dish for the evening meal.
post #40 of 62
Buy some chicken parts (I buy thighs because they're delicious and cheap), take them out, before washing or anything just put them in a baking dish dry, sprinkle with onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, a dash of hot pepper, or turmeric, or cumin, salt, pepper.... basically whatever seasoning you like, and bake at 400 degrees for 50 minutes to 1 hour, depending on what parts you have. It always gets a nice crusty skin, the chicken is juicy, serve with rice from a rice cooker or one of those 90-second Uncle Ben's bags, and nuked frozen veggie of choice or a salad. Prep time is maybe 10 minutes max, total, for everything, and you have a healthy dinner in an hour or so.
post #41 of 62
Canned Goya Beans;Black or Red. Potatos, minced garlic,ginger,onion, cayeene for spice, salt and pepper Grilled chicken dry rubbed with Garlic Salt, dried oregano or parsely, pepper. Preheat skillet with olive oil with chopped garlic Done.
post #42 of 62
post #43 of 62
post #44 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krishna Vaclava View Post
i am sure you can tell everyone there are few things as nice as inserting a tube of meat into your mouth and having the hot tasty juices glide down your willing throat that is always tasty for me but what do you think about that that would be my best suggestion for an easy dinner
ok dude. My easy dinner suggestions, without resorting to ready-made items or convenience foods: 1. chili is always a good pantry raid meal. 2-3 lbs (or however much you want) of cheap fatty ground beef to brown, reserve, saute a large onion or two and a minced clove of garlic or two. Season with chile powder, dried oregano, some cayenne if like it spicy, then chop and add a small can of chipotle chiles en adobo, plus a small can of green chiles (optional) and a couple diced green peppers. Re-introduce your ground beef, rinse and add 2-3 cans of different beans (pinto and black, usually) add a 32oz can or two of diced tomatoes, juice and all, a can of tomato sauce, a small can of tomato paste, throw in a few bay leaves, let it simmer for 45 mins-hour. Serve with whatever kind of carb you like, some corn bread, some regular crusty bread, rice, etc. Top with a grated cheese and some cilantro if you have it. If you catch sales on the canned goods and buy cheap meat, it can be $10 for a huge pot of chili that freezes well for another few more meals. mine (I like mine a little more tomato-ey and slightly soupy, less meaty): 2. My alfredo: I keep the sauce itself pure dairy; melt a generous amount of butter, add heavy cream, add grated parmesan and pecorino romano and heat over medium to low until the cheese just melts, toss with cooked fettucine (preferably with a half cup or so of reserved cooking water from the pasta) and then add whatever stuff you want to serve. Separately boiled broccoli, raw tomato chunks, grilled chicken breast, bacon chunks, etc, etc. 3. Grilled chicken breast: Slice the breast laterally in equal halves but not all the way, open like a book so it's doubled in area, and then pound out to even thickness with the back of your kitchen knife, to make a paillard. I usually rub a few drops of plain canola oil or a high-heat oil on both sides, sea salt and pepper, and then ground coriander, and that's it, maybe a squeeze of lemon if desired. I grill on a gas grill or pan fry, it cooks quickly, just a couple minutes per side, and maintains juiciness. I serve mine over a salad of avocado chunks, cherry tomatoes, micro-diced red onion, and a good salad cucumber cubed, dressed in only lemon zest and a bit of fresh lemon juice, salt, and pepper. Add crusty bread and it's a good light meal, good for summer too. The chicken also works well for sandwiches, over green or caesar salads, subbed for fajitas or tacos, etc. 4. Taco salad, super easy: Tortilla chips on bottom of big bowl, add salad greens of your choice (or bagged salad mix), chopped tomato, red onion, green pepper, fresh jalapeno, cilantro, warm and add a can of black beans, maybe some warmed white rice, and then I dress mine in a dollop of sour cream, a squeeze of lime, and a cheap hot sauce like tapatio or Valentina. 5. Salsa rice, super poor man's food: Add a lot of jarred salsa to white rice about halfway through cooking, plus a can of corn and a can of black beans, even a can of cooked chicken and some jarred jalapeno slices if desired. Optional could be cheese and cilantro to top, but this is something that could be pantry stuff and made whenever. 6. Cream soups are easy to make, provided you have the right stuff and don't substitute. Melt butter and then sautee a couple leeks sliced, add white onion and a clove of garlic, add dried thyme and some salt and pepper, then add a couple tablespoons of regular white flour and stir it all up so there are no lumps. Add in your vegetable(s) of choice (peeled potatoes, mushrooms, broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, celery, etc, pair a couple of the milder ones with a green one, etc) and then toss those together in the sauteed roux just a little more, then cover with a couple splashes of good chicken broth (liquid > buillon cubes) and cook til veggies are soft, run everything through a blender or hand-blend, and then add cream just before turning off heat and serving, the cream should just bubble up once. This one was potato and Hokkaido orange cauliflower, which I pureed, and then I added minced parsley and some tiny florets of separately steamed purple Hokkaido cauliflower at the end for color and texture) 7. Beef stew is easy to make. I make mine the Japanese way, by just pan frying flour-coated stew meat til browned, deglaze the pan in red wine, put everything in a stock pot, pour the rest of the wine in, a lot of beef buillon, some bay leaves, and cubed potatoes, carrots, onion, etc, and simmer til the liquid reduces a bit. Add a can or two of Japanese demiglace, let it thicken, and serve. 8: The omurice: To use up some eggs and leftover white rice. Pan sautee a little onion and diced chicken or ham, then add green pepper, and then peas. Deglaze with white wine and then add some pre-cooked white rice, a few squirts of ketchup til the mixture is slightly red, and then add like half a beef broth cube, chopped into a powder. Cook til warm, like a fried rice. Wipe pan down, stir up a couple eggs (couple splashes of milk too), grease pan liberally, and then pour eggs in, cook til they start to firm and then add rice mixture like you would an omelette, just a small football-shaped mound that you can cover with the rest of the egg. Cook til egg is ready to fold over the rice, do that, and then slid and shimmy onto plate. Top with a few squirts of keetchup. I like mine with demiglace sauce instead of ketchup. All of these are things you can make for about $10 and serve 2-4 people, maybe minus bread or sides, and some can go for 2 or more meals.
post #45 of 62
For a quick meal, I used to make 4 egg omelets. Throw in peppers, onions, sausage, chicken, broccoli rabe, spinach, or whatever you have in the kitchen. Finish off with some shredded cheese and toast some multi grain bread.

I'm salivating at the thought.
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