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Do you ever wear shoes that don't fit? - Page 4

post #46 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Gatsby View Post
Heredity is a major factor in bunion formation, due to stride and foot mechanics, but it is not in the least the only factor. Tight shoes, especially heels, while not the cause of bunions can greatly accelerate and exacerbate the bone deformation.

Are you an angry man horns?

Why, because I disagree with you?

You didn't address my point: if tight shoes accelerate and exacerbate bunions, then why did you get them at such a young age???

Also, answer this: if bunions are a deviation of the metatarsal bone away from the the second metatarsal bone (towards the midline of your body), then why wouldn't tight shoes hold that first metatarsal bone in place?
post #47 of 62
I am do it all of the time. If too big I just stuff em up with tollet paper so they fit. When they small, I slits em up the back and tape em back with duck tape then polish up tape with write color polish. I am doing it that away.
post #48 of 62
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post
Why, because I disagree with you? You didn't address my point: if tight shoes accelerate and exacerbate bunions, then why did you get them at such a young age??? Also, answer this: if bunions are a deviation of the metatarsal bone away from the the second metatarsal bone (towards the midline of your body), then why wouldn't tight shoes hold that first metatarsal bone in place?
My bunions developed because of stride anomaly. Tight shoes are not meant to conform to the foot's natural and shape curvature and the toes will not be aligned as they would be naturally. By that I mean that tight shoes do not 'fit like a glove' just because they are tight; the feet are distorted structurally when forced into a tight fitting shoe. Another topic, bursa sacks on the side of the foot where bunions develop can become irritated by tight fitting shoes, leading to soreness of this area. Recognize that bunions are not the only issue with tight fitting shoes. Shoes that fit incorrectly are bad for the feet in several ways.
post #49 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Gatsby View Post
My bunions developed because of stride anomaly.

What does that even mean?

[quote=Jay Gatsby;2311982Tight shoes are not meant to conform to the foot's natural and shape curvature and the toes will not be aligned as they would be naturally.[/QUOTE]

I agree with this - tight shoes do not fit well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Gatsby View Post
the feet are distorted structurally when forced into a tight fitting shoe.

So they stay distorted when you take them out of the tight-fitting shoe? If this was the case I would think that a bunion-shaped shoe, then, would be the culprit behind bunions. I've never seen such a thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Gatsby View Post
Another topic, bursa sacks on the side of the foot where bunions develop can become irritated by tight fitting shoes, leading to soreness of this area.

Bursal sacs can form because of the irritation of the skin and soft tissue between bunion and the shoe, yes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay Gatsby View Post
Recognize that bunions are not the only issue with tight fitting shoes. Shoes that fit incorrectly are bad for the feet in several ways.

Tight fitting shoes can irritate bunions, certainly, but they do not cause them in any way whatsoever. And yes, shoes that fit incorrectly are bad.
post #50 of 62
Thread Starter 
- There was imperfection in my walk.

- Shoes that are too tight must be worn for long periods of time to exacerbate the bunion. Shoes worn too tight less often can cause blisters and other problems.
post #51 of 62
For me, I find no reason to purchase shoes I know to be to large or to small. I view it to be a waste of money, again, for me. Some may have a legitimate medical need as proofed - orthotics - by competent medical authority; but that would be the only real need I can see to purchase a larger size than would otherwise be required. My two cents.
post #52 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
Better question: Do you wear shoes in more than one size?

I think the answer from any long-time shoe person is going to be yes, since sizing varies from make to make and style to style. You'd have to be OCD about size numbers and oblivious to fit if you had 25 pairs of shoes, from all different makers and in all different sizes, with matching size tags.

If a shoe is tagged a different size than you normally wear, that does not mean the shoe does not fit if it fits. And yes it makes sense that you might be able to wear two half-sizes in the same shoe with great pleasure, if the last is a good fit for your foot.

that's me -- i only buy shoes with a comfortable fit and matching size tag; i'm fine with that.
post #53 of 62
No, thaat's just silly. I don't mind shelling out the extra $$$ for something that is going to properly fit.
post #54 of 62
Yes, for 2 reasons, my feet are still growing, and I like my shoes to have a little extra pop, I fit like a glove into size 12 but I like to wear 12 1/2 and 13's. (I went to a Podiatrist about a year ago because of a broken foot and he said he thinks I will finish just shy of 13 american)
post #55 of 62
I only wear shoes that don't fit. I tell people I have abnormally large feet.





If only they knew I was sock-stuffing
post #56 of 62
When the foot is held in an unnatural position--too long or too short...and stretching the bones of the foot out of position; too tight or too narrow...forcing natural arches into hyper flexed or compressed configurations...the body tends to regard this distortion as an insult. Joints that are held open by hyperextension send a signal to the body that there is no "connectivity" between the bones of a joint and, in response, calcium is deposited in the gap. This is what causes bunions--the calcium build up. Arches...such as the metatarsal arch...that are compressed (by too narrow or too tight shoes) will "fall"--the high points of the arch eventually grounding. This causes hammer toes and sometimes severe pain under the ball of the foot not to mention neuromas which result from ganglia being strangled between metatarsal heads. These kinds of processes take place over a relatively long period of time. Years. But once established they do not naturally get better (quite the reverse--slowly deteriorating) and they are often irreversible short of surgery. Yes, we can fit the foot into too short, too long, too narrow, too tight, shoes...for a short period of time without noticing any ill effects. We can fit our feet into little wooden boxes, too. When we are young our feet seem...seem...to be able to accommodate themselves to a multitude of different environments. But the foot is one of the most architecturally complex structures in nature. It has a natural structure to it that is surely unwise to ignore. Like a bridge...how many cables do you want to cut, how many girders do you want to buckle? I might add that despite rumours to the contrary, children are almost universally born without bunions or major structural foot problems. As hard as it may be to believe, I suspect that 98% of foot problems in children are indeed due to ill fitting shoes. If you keep a child in shoes that are too big for his feet...or too short...there will be consequences. Some cultures have taken this to an extreme and the results should be illustrative. On the other hand, children in indigenous cultures who seldom or never wear shoes, virtually never have foot problems.
post #57 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluestrike2 View Post
I always like to keep 2-3 inches of extra toe room. You know, the whole saying about big feet and all. Unfortunately, everything else gets way too loose so I'm stuck wrapping my feet in athletic bandages before I put my shoes on. It's a bit difficult to walk, but sacrifices must be made at times. I don't know how you other people do it, wearing shoes that fit and all.
You've got to be joking. It's not the size of the feet. It's the size of the hands.
post #58 of 62
Can we institute a thread recall? Some number of votes and a ridiculous thread gets eliminated...
post #59 of 62
I used to force myself to wear shoes that were slightly too snug hoping they would stretch out with use. Now I don't wear any shoe that is either too big or small. Pain/foot damage is just not worth it.
post #60 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbris1 View Post
I used to force myself to wear shoes that were slightly too snug hoping they would stretch out with use. Now I don't wear any shoe that is either too big or small. Pain/foot damage is just not worth it.

I made the same mistake and i did finish with infected blisters after a few days.

It is not worth the price to pay.
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