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Price of velvet compared to other clothes? - Page 2

post #16 of 29
That appears to be a silk/rayon blend. And I'm not sure if its for upholstering or jacketing.
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoopee
That appears to be a silk/rayon blend. And I'm not sure if its for upholstering or jacketing.


The velvet material made of 100% silk is not listed on Fishman's website. I've seen and handled it at the store. I called the owner to verify price and availability. He stocks it in ten colors.
post #18 of 29
As I understand it, velvet is the result of a process (and I'm not sure that velveteen is a term of art). Cotton, rayon, linen, silk, and mohair have all been used to create fine cloth that could rightly be described as velvet.
post #19 of 29
I talked to some Kiton reps a couple of weeks ago, and asked them about their velvets. They said they didn't like doing velvets because it really shows all the sewing and other work on the jacket, and had more of a country feel than something sophisticated. What kinds of velvet suffer from this? I have a cotton velvet coat from RL Black Label, and it has excellent finishing, so I know at least cotton can be done well.

--Andre
post #20 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andre Yew
I talked to some Kiton reps a couple of weeks ago, and asked them about their velvets. They said they didn't like doing velvets because it really shows all the sewing and other work on the jacket, and had more of a country feel than something sophisticated. What kinds of velvet suffer from this? I have a cotton velvet coat from RL Black Label, and it has excellent finishing, so I know at least cotton can be done well.

--Andre

How much did you end up spending on the cotton RL, if you dont mind? My other reasoning for going bespoke is because it seems like everyone has gotten all there spring stuff in and it might also be hard for me to find a RTW velvet sport coat or DJ at RL etc.
post #21 of 29
I believe it was right around $1K, and it was on sale.

--Andre
post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by pejsek
As I understand it, velvet is the result of a process (and I'm not sure that velveteen is a term of art). Cotton, rayon, linen, silk, and mohair have all been used to create fine cloth that could rightly be described as velvet.

Mohair makes into velour.
post #23 of 29
Isn't the velvet jacket trend about played out? I would be slow to put a lot of $ into a custom jacket if it were trendy. I recently saw a velvet jacket at Target.

Please correct me if I am wrong. I don't pretend to know what the trends are.
post #24 of 29
Trend? Well, I guess trends get it right sometimes then. I love to wear velvet, and doubly love the attention (and touches) it brings.

Tom
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Velvet not made with silk is called velveteen.

Not the same thing

Cotton

Anthony
post #26 of 29
velveteen is a type of cloth [usually cotton] made in imitation of velvet, it has a shorter pile. velour is a heavy fabric that resembles velvet. velvet is a fabric, having a short, close nap of erect threads. it can be woven from a number of fibers including silk and cotton or a combination of fibers like silk, linen, nylon, acetate, or rayon. The most common silk velvet I've come across is rayon pile on a silk base, 18% silk - 82% rayon. Sewing silk requires small size needles and like many silk fabrics it shows pin holes. One of the hardest things about working with silk, is that it slippery, another is dull needles will pull the yarns making puckers, it really is a pain to work with, but when done right the rewards are worth the time and trouble. If you tape the edges to be sewn it will keep them from slipping, sew 1/4" in from the tape then cut the taped fabric off after sewing. Anthony
post #27 of 29
I've heard that you can not press velvet, is that true? Scabal has a really nice velvet jacketing that I've been considering for nights out, but to be unable to press it would make the expenditure a little ridiculous for me.
post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek
I've heard that you can not press velvet, is that true? Scabal has a really nice velvet jacketing that I've been considering for nights out, but to be unable to press it would make the expenditure a little ridiculous for me.
Steam is your friend my man.
post #29 of 29
Never press velvet on the pile side. Pressing should be minimal and only to the back of the velvet after placing the fabric pile down on a needleboard or scrap piece of velvet (pile side up)

Creasing or bruising of the pile after wearing, although infrequent, can be restored by minimal steaming to the back of the velvet. (Special care should be taken to ensure that water does not make contact with velvet qualities designated dry clean only).

From http://www.denholme-velvets.co.uk/Care.htm
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